How can I go through the citizenship process faster? 13 Answers as of June 28, 2013

I have been a permenante residenat for 3 years but I live in Another country for work purposes, i come every six months to maintain residency . Is there a way of speeding the citizenship
Thank you

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Gilgannon Law, LLC | Stuart D.P. Gilgannon
As well as having to be a permanent resident for the required amount of time, there is also a physical presence requirement that must be satisfied before you can naturalize. You should consult with an immigration attorney who can assist you with calculating your eligibility under these requirements.
Answer Applies to: Wisconsin
Replied: 7/31/2012
Law Offices of Brian D. Lerner, A PC
Law Offices of Brian D. Lerner, A PC | Brian David Lerner
Are you working for the government?
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 6/28/2013
Hanna Legal, LLC
Hanna Legal, LLC | Jen Hanna
Depending on how you got your permanent residence, you must hold the status for either 3 years and have been inside the US for at least 18 months, or 5 years and have been inside the US for at least 30 months. Unless you are active duty in the US military, there is pretty much no way around this. There are a few exceptions the the US presence requirement if you are outside of the US for certain types of work and were approved for an N-470. Here is a helpful chart: http://www.immihelp.com/citizenship/naturalization-eligibility.html
Answer Applies to: Wisconsin
Replied: 7/30/2012
World Esquire Law Firm
World Esquire Law Firm | Aime Katambwe
If you received your green card through marriage with a USC, then you may be closer than you think to filing for USC: 2 years and 9 months in linear time but you have to make sure that at least half that time was spent here in the US. If not, then you are working with the 5-year requirement in which case you still have some ways to go. There is no fast-tracking this process. You just have to put in the time.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 7/30/2012
William C. Gosnell, Attorney at Law
William C. Gosnell, Attorney at Law | William C. Gosnell
No.
Answer Applies to: Tennessee
Replied: 5/29/2013
    Law Offices of Grinberg and Segal
    Law Offices of Grinberg and Segal | Alexander Segal
    You cannot speed up U.S. citizenship. In addition, you may have difficulty meeting the physical presence and residence requirements if you are spending 6 months or more outside the U.S. each year. You also should keep in mind that there is no bright line rule as to residence any longer. While stays outside the U.S. for a year or more lead to a presumption of abandonment, it is merely a presumption and stays outside the country of less can be considered abandonment.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 7/27/2012
    Law Offices of Patricia M. Corrales
    Law Offices of Patricia M. Corrales | Patricia M. Corrales
    There is really no way to speed up the citizenship process unless you are actively in the military. That said, you can apply for citizenship after 5 years of being a lawful permanent resident under section 316 of the Immigration and Nationality Act ("INA") or 3 years after being a lawful permanent resident if you are married to a USC under section 319 of the INA or 1 year if you are in the military under section 328. Also, if you are a lawful permanent resident working abroad, you should file an application with USCIS to perserve your residency for naturalization purposes since you are working abroad particularly if your employment is with the Government of the United States or of with American instiution of research recognized as such by the Attorney General or with an American firm or corporation engaged in the development, in whole or in part, in the development of foreign trade or commerce with the United States. Otherwise, you risk having a residency issue when you apply for naturalizaiton. As always, given that U.S. citizenship is a great privilege, I would recommend you speak with an attorney who specializes in immigration law with a particular emphasis in citizenship related issues.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 7/27/2012
    Frazier, Soloway & Poorak, P.C.
    Frazier, Soloway & Poorak, P.C. | David Nabow Soloway
    A permanent resident can become eligible for naturalization after 5 years (and after only 3 years for most spouses of U.S. citizens), and may file a petition for naturalization 90 days before the end of the 5-year or 3-year period. There are no steps to accelerate those periods. If you reside in another country and just return periodically (and without ever having an absence of six months or longer), you STILL may be unable to meet the (1) residence and (2) physical presence requirements for naturalization eligibility. Worse than just risking denial of a naturalization petition, in some circumstances applying for naturalization despite long absences can even result in the USCIS determining that a person has abandoned his Permanent Resident status. There is no substitute for engaging an immigration attorney to carefully examine your absences, your work while abroad (work as a missionary work for a U.S. government agency work for a company engaged in international trade, etc.), eligibility/actual filing of a Form N-470, and related issues. Some immigration law firms, including mine, offer legal services on a "flat fee" basis so that a client will know the total expense from the very beginning, and a few immigration law firms, including mine, offer an initial consultation free of charge.
    Answer Applies to: Georgia
    Replied: 7/27/2012
    Law Office of Michael P. Gianelli, LLC
    Law Office of Michael P. Gianelli, LLC | Michael Gianelli
    You should consult with an immigration attorney and find out if you meet both the continuous presence and physical presence requirements for naturalization eligibility. The attorney should be able to tell you when you can apply and whether you can take advantage of a rule that permits filing 90 days before establishing continuous residence requirements.
    Answer Applies to: Colorado
    Replied: 7/27/2012
    Law Office of Bijal Jani | Bijal Jani
    The best way to have the citizenship through naturalization process occur faster is to submit a complete application package to USCIS, appear in a timely manner for the fingerprinting and testing. It should be noted, however, that your stay in the overseas country for extended periods of time will be questioned by the USCIS.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 7/27/2012
    Law Office of Pho Ethan Tran PLLC
    Law Office of Pho Ethan Tran PLLC | Pho Ethan Tran
    If you received your residency through marriage to a US citizen and are still married, you can apply for citizenship after 3 years. Otherwise, you must wait until you have been a resident for at least 4 years and 9 months.
    Answer Applies to: Texas
    Replied: 7/27/2012
    Law Office of Rebecca White
    Law Office of Rebecca White | Rebecca White
    I will need more information before I can assist you. I will need to know your employer, and, if you are married, your spouse's employer.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 7/27/2012
    Law Offices of Svetlana Boukhny
    Law Offices of Svetlana Boukhny | Svetlana Boukhny
    No, there is not. In fact, because you are outside the US for extended periods of time, it will take you longer than for most to be eligible to apply for citizenship because you will not have the physical presence requirement fulfilled as quickly as people who remain in the US.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 7/27/2012
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