How can I go about recieving child support that I have not recieved in 6 months? 16 Answers as of June 26, 2013

I am a college student and thought that when my parents divorce my father was obligated to pay child support until I graduate. I have not received any child support in 6 months. I have been trying to reach my father's lawyer, but she is unresponsive. I want to go about taking things into my own hands, and need some advice on how to do so.

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Warner Center Law Offices of Donald F. Conviser
Warner Center Law Offices of Donald F. Conviser | Donald F. Conviser
Unless the Judgment in the divorce case contained stipulated terms extending Child Support beyond the date that the law cuts off Child Support (when you reach 18 years of age, unless you are still a full-time high school student, in which case, Child Support would continue until the first event of your completion of the 12th grade or your reaching 19 years of age), Child Support would have ended as of the date thatt the law cuts off Child Support. Get a copy of the Judgment from your mother or from the Court. But you should be aware that Child Support is payable to your mother (the person who supported you), not to you.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 11/28/2011
Law Office of Kathryn L. Hudson
Law Office of Kathryn L. Hudson | Kathryn L. Hudson
If there was a court order for child support that was unpaid and you are now over 18 you can pursue collection on your own by filing a suit yourself. Child support payments typically stop when the child reaches the age of 18 unless the court order states otherwise. Any arrears in support though continue to be due with interest until paid.
Answer Applies to: Arkansas
Replied: 11/21/2011
The Law Office of Erin Farley
The Law Office of Erin Farley | Erin Farley
Child support is owed until a child turns 19 or graduates from high school, whichever is sooner. I don't know your age, but if you are over 18, Dad's obligation has ended.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 11/19/2011
Ashman Law Office
Ashman Law Office | Glen Edward Ashman
Children don't collect child support. Parents do. If there is any due and usually there is not if you were in college, your mother would be the only one who could seek it. Your father's lawyer cannot legally talk to you and you should not be calling him.
Answer Applies to: Georgia
Replied: 11/19/2011
Law Office Of Jody A. Miller
Law Office Of Jody A. Miller | Jody A. Miller
You do not have standing to go after back child support as the child; only the person who was to receive the child support has that right.
Answer Applies to: Georgia
Replied: 11/18/2011
    John E. Kirchner, Attorney at Law
    John E. Kirchner, Attorney at Law | John Kirchner
    Unless there is a court order requiring the child support to be paid directly to you, it is probably your mother's responsibility to receive and enforce the child support. You don't indicate your age, but if you are in college it is possible that you are beyond the age that child support is even payable. You need to talk to your mother and/or her attorney to determine exactly what your father's obligation is and how to pursue enforcement of that obligation.
    Answer Applies to: Colorado
    Replied: 11/18/2011
    The McDonnell Law Firm, PLLC
    The McDonnell Law Firm, PLLC | Patrick J. McDonnell
    If there is a court order to pay child support, just file a violation petition with Family Court. If there is no court order to pay child support, you may be out of luck until you file and get an order.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 11/18/2011
    Odin, Feldman & Pittleman, P.C.
    Odin, Feldman & Pittleman, P.C. | Richard A. Gray
    Your father is only required to pay child support until age 18 or if not graduate from high school at that point, up to age 19 or graduation from high school; whichever first occurs. Unless your parents agreed to pay for college, Virginia will not order payment of post-secondary educational expenses. From your email is sounds like you graduated high school 6 or so months ago; which is when child support ends in Virginia.
    Answer Applies to: Virginia
    Replied: 11/18/2011
    Glenn E. Tanner
    Glenn E. Tanner | Glenn E. Tanner
    This is your mother's problem, not yours.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 6/26/2013
    Law Office of James Lentz
    Law Office of James Lentz | James Lentz
    Unless your parents' divorce decree ordered to the contrary, child support in Ohio usually ends when the child turns 18 or graduates high school, whichever happens second. You should take a copy of your parent's divorce decree to a domestic relations lawyer to determine exactly what your rights are.
    Answer Applies to: Ohio
    Replied: 11/18/2011
    Goolsby Law Office
    Goolsby Law Office | Richard Goolsby
    Your mother (or her divorce lawyer) should have a copy of the decree and the settlement agreement which may provide the information you discuss concerning his alleged agreement to pay child support or college expenses, (assuming that is the case).
    Answer Applies to: Georgia
    Replied: 11/18/2011
    Law Office of L. Paul Zahn
    Law Office of L. Paul Zahn | Paul Zahn
    Generally, your child support would terminate when you graduate from high school. Some states differ on the age of termination. That said, the support is not owed to you directly, so you will never receive it. It goes to your parent who has paid to support you. As such, there is no reason for you to contact your father's attorney. The money does not go to you. If support is still owed and it isn't being paid to your mother, then she should consider contacting your father's attorney or speaking with an attorney herself.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 11/18/2011
    Diana K. Zilko, Attorney at Law
    Diana K. Zilko, Attorney at Law | Diana K. Zilko
    Child support gets paid to the parent, not the child. Check with your mother to see if she has been receiving the payments.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 11/18/2011
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