How can I get rid of my warrants? 6 Answers as of August 18, 2011

I got a domestic violence charge in 05 and a no contact order violation in 07 and there are 2 warrants for my arrest. How can I get this case closed?

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Andersen Law PLLC
Andersen Law PLLC | Craig Andersen
There are only two ways to get a case closed. Number one, by a guilty plea. The other way would be going to trial and having a jury decide your guilt or lack of guilt. As far as the warrants are concerned, you need to appear in court and have them "quashed" or cancelled and deal with the charges. As long as you have active warrants, the Statute of Limitations is "tolled" or put on hold so you can't wait this out.
Answer Applies to: Washington
Replied: 8/18/2011
Law Office of Andrew Subin
Law Office of Andrew Subin | Andrew Subin
You have to make an appearance in the court that issued the warrants.
Answer Applies to: Washington
Replied: 8/17/2011
Law Office of James A Schoenberger
Law Office of James A Schoenberger | James A Schoenberger
You will need to set a quash hearing to quash the warrants. You will then be arraigned on the outstanding charges.
Answer Applies to: Washington
Replied: 8/16/2011
Michael Maltby, Attorney at Law
Michael Maltby, Attorney at Law | Michael Maltby
You need to go to court to get the warrants quashed and you have to deal with the charges. You really need an attorney in order to make this as painless as possible.
Answer Applies to: Washington
Replied: 8/16/2011
Law Office of Michael Morgan, l.L.C.
Law Office of Michael Morgan, l.L.C. | Michael Morgan
Unless the warrants were not renewed, which is possible, you need to get on the calendar or (if there is no specific warrant recall calendar) schedule a hearing before the court(s) the warrants were ordered from.
Answer Applies to: Washington
Replied: 8/16/2011
    John Segelbaum, P.S.
    John Segelbaum, P.S. | John Segelbaum
    You need to clear the warrants by posting bail or filing a motion to quash the warrants. You still need to resolve the underlying issues with the court.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 8/16/2011
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