How can I get my felony expunged? 53 Answers as of July 11, 2013

I'm trying to find out how I can get my felony expunged.

Ask a Local Attorney. 100% Anonymous. Free Answers.

Free Case Evaluation by a Local Lawyer: Click here
Edward  D. Dowling IV Attorney at Law
Edward D. Dowling IV Attorney at Law | Edward D. Dowling IV
This response is general information only and does not establish an attorney client relationship. However, you can make an application to the court to try to expunge it but you should hire an attorney to do it.
Answer Applies to: New York
Replied: 7/5/2011
Jonathan S. Willett Attorney at Law
Jonathan S. Willett Attorney at Law | Jonathan S. Willett
If you want to do this yourself, you can try the Colorado State Judicial Home page and search "forms" for "Petition to Seal."
Answer Applies to: Colorado
Replied: 7/5/2011
Law Office of James A Schoenberger
Law Office of James A Schoenberger | James A Schoenberger
Felonies may be expunged after a period of time - 5 years for a class C felony and 10 years for a class B felony. The time runs from the completion of any sentence and community custody.
Answer Applies to: Washington
Replied: 7/5/2011
Thomas J. Tomko Attorney At law
Thomas J. Tomko Attorney At law | Thomas J. Tomko
Thank you for your inquiry In Michigan, you can get an expungement for a non-excluded offense if you have only one offense of any kind on your record, and it has been 5 years from the date of sentence. A Motion must be filed int he court where the conviction took place, and if you meet other procedural requirements, then the offense can be expunged. It is best to hire an attorney to assist you in this.
Answer Applies to: Michigan
Replied: 7/5/2011
Bristol & Dubiel LLP
Bristol & Dubiel LLP | Murray L. Bristol
In Texas you should contact an attorney that can explain your rights for a felony expungement. If you qualify for an expungement, a Petition must be filed in the District court of the county where the offense was filed.
Answer Applies to: Texas
Replied: 7/5/2011
    Law Office of Michael Brodsky
    Law Office of Michael Brodsky | Michael Brodsky
    In the State of Washington, criminal convictions can be "vacated" which permits the person to tell the prospective employer that they have not been convicted of the vacated crime. It is usually limited to the most recent conviction and requires being conviction-free a certain period of time following completion of ALL conditions of the sentence including payment of all legal financial obligations (fines, restitution, etc). While one can try to do this without a lawyer, it can pretty pretty confusing and complicated.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 7/5/2011
    Bloom Legal, LLC
    Bloom Legal, LLC | Seth J. Bloom
    You can hire an attorney in your local jurisdiction who will be able to file expungement motions for you. Expungements can be complicated legal proceedings and should generally be handled by attorneys with experience in such matters.
    Answer Applies to: Louisiana
    Replied: 7/1/2011
    Law Office of Phillip Weiser
    Law Office of Phillip Weiser | Phillip L. Weiser
    You should consult with an experienced expungement attorney to determine if your specific felony can be expunged and how long you must wait to file for an expungement. Some felonies are not expungeable, while others have a three to five year waiting period.
    Answer Applies to: Kansas
    Replied: 7/1/2011
    Harden Law Offices
    Harden Law Offices | Leonard D. Harden
    Go to this link for form: http://www.courts.state.nh.us/forms/nhjb-2317-ds.pdf The controlling statute is: 651:5 Annulment of Criminal Records. - I. Except as provided in paragraphs V-VIII, the record of arrest, conviction and sentence of any person may be annulled by the sentencing court at any time in response to a petition for annulment which is timely brought in accordance with the provisions of this section if in the opinion of the court, after hearing, the annulment will assist in the petitioner's rehabilitation and will be consistent with the public welfare. II. Any person whose arrest has resulted in a finding of not guilty, or whose case was dismissed or not prosecuted, may petition for annulment of the arrest record at any time in accordance with the provisions of this section. III. Except as provided in RSA 265-A:21 or in paragraphs V and VI, any person convicted of an offense may petition for annulment of the record of arrest, conviction, and sentence when the petitioner has completed all the terms and conditions of the sentence and has thereafter been convicted of no other crime, except a motor vehicle offense classified as a violation other than driving while intoxicated under RSA 265-A:2, I, RSA 265:82, or RSA 265:82-a for a period of time as follows: (a) For a violation, one year, unless the underlying conviction was for an offense specified under RSA 259:39. (b) For a class B misdemeanor except as provided in subparagraph (f), 3 years. (c) For a class A misdemeanor except as provided in subparagraph (f), 3 years. (d) For a class B felony except as provided in subparagraph (g), 5 years. (e) For a class A felony, 10 years. (f) For sexual assault under RSA 632-A:4, 10 years. (g) For felony indecent exposure or lewdness under RSA 645:1, II, 10 years. IV. If a petition for annulment is denied, no further petition shall be brought more frequently than every 3 years thereafter. V. No petition shall be brought and no annulment granted in the case of any violent crime, of any crime of obstruction of justice, or of any offense for which the petitioner was sentenced to an extended term of imprisonment under RSA 651:6. VI. If a person has been convicted of more than one offense, no petition for annulment shall be brought and no annulment granted: (a) If annulment of any part of the record is barred under paragraph V; or (b) Until the time requirements under paragraphs III and IV for all offenses of record have been met. VI-a. A conviction for an offense committed under the laws of another state which would not be considered an offense under New Hampshire law, shall not count as a conviction for the purpose of obtaining an annulment under this section. VII. If, prior to disposition by the court of a petition for annulment, the petitioner is charged with an offense conviction for which would bar such annulment under paragraph V or VI(a) or would extend the time requirements under paragraphs III, IV and VI(b), the petition shall not be acted upon until the charge is disposed. VIII. Any petition for annulment which does not meet the requirements of paragraphs III-VI shall be dismissed without a hearing. IX. When a petition for annulment is timely brought, the court shall require the department of corrections to report to the court concerning any state or federal convictions, arrests or prosecutions of the petitioner and any other information which the court believes may aid in making a determination on the petition. The department shall charge the petitioner a fee of $100 to cover the cost of such investigation unless the petitioner demonstrates that he or she is indigent, or has been found not guilty, or the case has been dismissed or not prosecuted in accordance with paragraph II. The department of safety shall charge the successful petitioner a fee of $100 for researching and correcting the criminal history record accordingly, unless the petitioner demonstrates that he or she is indigent, or has been found not guilty, or the case has been dismissed or not prosecuted in accordance with paragraph II. The court shall provide a copy of the petition to the prosecutor of the underlying offense and permit them to be heard regarding the interest of justice in regard to the petition. X. Upon entry of an order of annulment: (a) The person whose record is annulled shall be treated in all respects as if he had never been arrested, convicted or sentenced, except that, upon conviction of any crime committed after the order of annulment has been entered, the prior conviction may be considered by the court in determining the sentence to be imposed, and may be counted toward habitual offender status under RSA 259:39. (b) The court shall issue the person a certificate stating that such person's behavior after the conviction has warranted the issuance of the order, and that its effect is to annul the record of arrest, conviction and sentence, and shall notify the state police criminal records unit and the arresting agency. (c) In any application for employment, license or other civil right or privilege, or in any appearance as a witness in any proceeding or hearing, a person may be questioned about a previous criminal record only in terms such as "Have you ever been arrested for or convicted of a crime that has not been annulled by a court?' XI. Nothing in this section shall affect any right: (a) Of the person whose record has been annulled to appeal from the conviction or sentence or to rely on it in bar of any subsequent proceedings for the same offense; or (b) Of law enforcement officers to maintain arrest and conviction records and to communicate information regarding the annulled record of arrest or conviction to other law enforcement officers for legitimate investigative purposes or in defense of any civil suit arising out of the facts of the arrest, or to the police standards and training council solely for the purpose of assisting the council in determining the fitness of an individual to serve as a law enforcement officer, in any of which cases such information shall not be disclosed to any other person. XII. A person is guilty of a misdemeanor if, during the life of another who has had a record of arrest or conviction annulled pursuant to this section, he discloses or communicates the existence of such record except as provided in subparagraph XI(b). XIII. As used in this section, "violent crime' means: (a) Capital murder, first or second degree murder, manslaughter, or class A felony negligent homicide under RSA 630; (b) First degree assault under RSA 631:1; (c) Aggravated felonious sexual assault or felonious sexual assault under RSA 632-A; (d) Kidnapping or criminal restraint under RSA 633; (e) Class A felony arson under RSA 634:1; (f) Robbery under RSA 636; (g) Incest under RSA 639:2, III or endangering the welfare of a child by solicitation under RSA 639:3, III; or (h) Any felonious child pornography offense under RSA 649-A. XIV. As used in this section, "crime of obstruction of justice' means: (a) Tampering with witnesses or informants under RSA 641:5 or falsifying evidence under RSA 641:6; or (b) Any felonious offense of obstructing governmental operations under RSA 642. XV. A petition for annulment of any record of arrest, conviction, and sentence authorized by this section may be brought in the supreme court with respect to any such record in the supreme court, provided that no record in the supreme court relating to an opinion published in the New Hampshire Reports may be annulled. Good luck.
    Answer Applies to: New Hampshire
    Replied: 7/1/2011
    Michael Breczinski
    Michael Breczinski | Michael Breczinski
    Is it your only conviction(felony or misdemeanor) ? if yes then continue otherwise you are not eligible. Has 5 years gone by since sentenced or since you got out of jail whichever is longer. if yes then continue if not wait. Is it for a life offense or one involving vehicles if yes you are not eligible if no then you can file a petition. You will need to file a petition in the court that handled the matter send a copy ofthe petition to the Attorney General and the County prosecutor. Also you have to get your fingerprints taken and send them with another copy of the petition to the Michigan State Police. then a hearing has to be set down the road and the judge gets to decide if you should get the conviction erased. He does not have to do it. It is in the judge's discretion whether he expunges your conviction or not. Get an attorney.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 7/1/2011
    Wallin & Klarich: A Law Corporation
    Wallin & Klarich: A Law Corporation | Daniel S. Moffatt
    To get a felony conviction expunged there are several conditions that must be in place prior to making this motion under Penal code section 1203.4(a).
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 7/1/2011
    Law Office of Richard Williams
    Law Office of Richard Williams | Richard Williams
    There are no expungement laws in the State of Alabama at this time. There has been an expungement and a non-disclosure law pending in the Alabama Legislature but it yet to be seriously considered.
    Answer Applies to: Alabama
    Replied: 7/1/2011
    Andersen Law PLLC
    Andersen Law PLLC | Craig Andersen
    In order to have a felony dismissed and vacated in Washington, one must first check his or her record against a list of crimes that cannot be vacated and dismissed. Generally, any sex offense or serious violent felony, including kidnapping , can't be vacated. Neither can DUI, Vehicular Assault or Vehicular Homicide. If you have any felony not excluded it can be vacated and dismissed upon filing a Petition with the court. Once that's done, the felon is no longer a felon and can answer that he is not a felon. That would also clear the way to voting and holding public office. At the same time, one can also petition the court to restore firearms rights. Each petition has a $300 filing fee. I charge $2500 flat fees for each although if done at the same time, we can work something out. For more information on these petitions, please see the Washington State Court's Web Site. Look at the criminal forms and you can download them and the instructions. Please also feel free to call me if you wish to discuss this further.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 7/1/2011
    Nelson & Lawless
    Nelson & Lawless | Terry Nelson
    The general rule is: Records are forever. However, you can consider getting the conviction expunged; which would help in obtaining and keeping employment. Many convictions can be 'expunged' from criminal records by proper application and Petition to the court, but only if there was no felony prison time sentenced whether served or not, and if it was not for certain listed Sexual and Domestic Violence crimes [PC 286(c), PC288, PC288a(c), PC288.5, PC289(j), PC261.5(d)], and if all terms of sentencing and at least one year of probation are completed, and if there are no new charges pending. If successful, the conviction would be retroactively reduced to a misdemeanor, if necessary, and then withdrawn and the charges dismissed. Expungement does not clear, 'remove' or erase the conviction, but merely changes the record to show 'conviction reversed and dismissed by expungement'. When applying for a job in the private sector, you generally do not have to disclose a conviction if it was expunged. However, the conviction is still a 'prior' or 'strike' for purposes of repeat offense, and must be disclosed on any application for government and professional employment and licensing, bonding, security clearance, etc. The licensing agency and employer then can decide whether you are barred from licensing or employment because of the conviction. If youre serious about doing this, and you think you qualify under those rules, feel free to contact me for the legal help you'll need.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 7/1/2011
    Cornish, Crowley, Rockafellow, & Sartz, PLLC
    Cornish, Crowley, Rockafellow, & Sartz, PLLC | Jacob Peter Sartz IV
    My first advice would be to obtain an attorney to assist you with this matter. You may be eligible to expunge that prior conviction. Expunging a crime in Michigan is complicated. This response does not contain specific legal advice. If you need specific legal advice for your own circumstances, I recommend consulting with an attorney experienced with these types of matters. Most attorneys provide free initial consultations. Speaking in general terms, there are several significant obstacles to getting offenses expunged in Michigan. Expunging a criminal charge is great way of clearing up past mistakes. However, there are a series of obstacles. First, an applicant must only have one, single, count or charge, whether it's a misdemeanor or felony. If a person has more than one conviction on their record, whether it was multiple counts from the original case, or separate convictions, they are not eligible. Second, certain offenses cannot be expunged. Traffic offenses for example, even something as simple as driving on a suspended license, a lot of high level or capital felonies, and other offenses as listed in the applicable statutes, cannot be expunged. It depends on which offense is currently on the person's record. Additionally, even if a person only had one offense, if they had issues with probation, i.e., probation violations or other infractions while serving their sentence, that may be obstacle as well. There is also a time limitation. Any effort to expunge an offense cannot commence until five years after the date of conviction. Lastly, expunging an offense from a criminal record takes time, requires a lot of paperwork, carries some notable costs, and eventually, applicants need to appear before a judge and convince the judge that they are worthy of having the offense expunged in order to complete the process. Please consult with and retain a criminal defense attorney, preferably an experienced one who has handled these matters, to assist you with the process. Most attorneys offer a free initial consultation.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 7/1/2011
    Law Offices of Sheryl S. Graf
    Law Offices of Sheryl S. Graf | Sheryl S. Graf
    The basic rule is that if you have successfully completed probation, you may obtain a dismissal of the case under California Penal Code section 1203.4, commonly known as an expungement. Some types of convictions are excluded and may not be expunged. If you qualify, relief is mandatory - meaning once you have completed probation and fulfilled its conditions, your request for expungement must be granted. As each courthouse has its own procedures and forms, you may want to seek the assistance of an attorney to assist you.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 7/1/2011
    Law Offices of Martina A. Vigil, PC
    Law Offices of Martina A. Vigil, PC | Martina A. Vigil
    Most felonies may be dropped to a misdemeanor by a 17(b) motion. That misdemeanor may be dismissed by way of a 1203.4 motion. A 1203.4 essentially requests the Court to allow an individual to withdraw their plea of guilty and enter a plea of not guilty. If there is no objection by the District Attorney's office, your case will be dismissed and you can say you've never been convicted of a crime. If you have not violated the terms of your parole/ probation and have not violated any laws since your conviction date, you are likely to be successful in your expungement. This is assuming your conviction can be 17(b)'d and expunged. Reference the Penal Code to help you determine this.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 6/30/2011
    Gregory Casale Attorney at Law
    Gregory Casale Attorney at Law | Gregory Casale
    You can read about this at my web site. Basically you cannot get your felony "expunged" in Mass, but you may be able to have your record sealed. If you would like to discuss this further, there is no fee for the telephone consultation.
    Answer Applies to: Massachusetts
    Replied: 6/30/2011
    Singh Law Office
    Singh Law Office | Kulvinder Singh
    Yes. Contact the probation department, or the facilitator, or hire a lawyer.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 6/30/2011
    The Woods Law Firm
    The Woods Law Firm | F.W. Woods Jr.
    It depends on the state. Most southern states do not allow for felonies to be expunged. The only exception is if the governor grants a pardon to the defendant. A pardon, however, is extremely rare.
    Answer Applies to: South Carolina
    Replied: 6/30/2011
    Law Offices of John Carney
    Law Offices of John Carney | John Carney
    This is the most common question that I get. There is no expungement statute in New York unless you have a current drug case and go through Judicial Diversion. Once you have a conviction you can retain an attorney to see if you have grounds to make a 440.10 motion to vacate the conviction on some grounds such as it was illegal, unfair, improper, or that there is new evidence. I just won such a motion. It took 6 months and $5,000, but I had the felony conviction vacated and a Youthful Offender Treatment was granted so he has no record, no jail, and no probation. If you can afford that type of fee and you have such grounds call for a consultation. It is like an appeal but can be made at any time unlike an appeal which has to be filed within 30 days of the sentence.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 6/30/2011
    Wallin & Klarich: A Law Corporation
    Wallin & Klarich: A Law Corporation | Christopher Lee
    The relevant penal code section is 1203.4. In order to even qualify for an expungement you must serve the term of your probation, pay all fines and restitution, make all necessary court appearances, refrain from committing any new crimes, and Comply with any other conditions of probation imposed by the court. However if you have served any time in state prison, you will not qualify for an expungement.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 6/30/2011
    The Chastaine Law Office
    The Chastaine Law Office | Michael Chastaine
    You can only get an expungement of you were granted probation. There are certain offenses that can not be expunged. It is best to talk to a knowledgeable attorney regarding your eligibility and the process. We would be happy to help. Normally, if you are eligible we can do it for $1000 + filing fee.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 6/30/2011
    Law Office of Brendan M. Kelly
    Law Office of Brendan M. Kelly | Brendan M. Kelly
    Sorry, not likely to get a felony conviction expunged from your record in Nebraska, since it is not allowed.
    Answer Applies to: Nebraska
    Replied: 6/30/2011
    Palumbo and Kosofsky
    Palumbo and Kosofsky | Michael Palumbo
    You can retain our office to make an application for relief from disability. The retainer fee will be at least $5,000.00. Give us a call toll free for a no cost phone consultation to discuss.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 6/30/2011
    Law Office of Eric Sterkenburg
    Law Office of Eric Sterkenburg | Eric Sterkenburg
    That depends on the.facts of the case. If.the facts are right it can be expunged.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 6/30/2011
    Healan Law Offices
    Healan Law Offices | William D. Healan, III
    You do not qualify for expungement if you plead guilty or were convicted. If you were not, you might qualify. There is a form that you have to fill out with the arresting agency.
    Answer Applies to: Georgia
    Replied: 6/30/2011
    Harris Law Firm
    Harris Law Firm | Jennifer C. Robins
    In Oregon, only class C felonies may be expunged and even then, there are certain types of class C felonies that cannot be expunged (certain sex crimes and domestic abuse crimes). Expunction may only happen after a certain amount of time has passed since the conviction and there are other time line requirements. I suggest contacting a local attorney that specializes in expunction. A brief phone call will be able to determine if your criminal history is eligible for expunction and, if so, the proper procedure to follow in order to do so.
    Answer Applies to: Oregon
    Replied: 6/30/2011
    Law Office of Andrew Subin
    Law Office of Andrew Subin | Andrew Subin
    If you have been crime free for the minimum number of years, most felonies can be expunged and/or vacated.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 6/30/2011
    Beaulier Law Office
    Beaulier Law Office | Maury Beaulier
    Under Minnesota's current law a statutory expungement is not possible upon conviction.
    Answer Applies to: Minnesota
    Replied: 6/30/2011
    Attorney at Law
    Attorney at Law | Steven C. Bullock
    In Michigan there is a statute that outlines the procedure to have a felony expunged. I would always suggest you hire an attorney to help you with the process.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 6/30/2011
    Law Office of Peter F. Goldscheider
    Law Office of Peter F. Goldscheider | Peter Goldscheider
    If you can afford it, you should contact an experienced criminal law specialist for complete information. You may be able to have the matter reduced to a misdemeanor. In the alternative, you can contact the county probation department to see if they can assist you.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 6/30/2011
    Dunnings Law Firm
    Dunnings Law Firm | Steven Dunnings
    You have to wait 5 years from the date of conviction and have no other criminal convictions.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 6/30/2011
    Goolsby Law Office
    Goolsby Law Office | Richard Goolsby
    You should find a criminal lawyer in your area who handles expungements to discuss your rights and options. Good luck!
    Answer Applies to: Georgia
    Replied: 6/30/2011
    Law Office of Jared Altman
    Law Office of Jared Altman | Jared Altman
    There is no such thing as expunging in the State of New York.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 6/30/2011
    Pontrello Law
    Pontrello Law | William Pontrello
    In Florida you must meet the requirements of that specific statute for sealing your record. expungement comes only after 10 years of sealing or extraordinary circumstances. consult a lawyer its worth it.
    Answer Applies to: Florida
    Replied: 6/30/2011
    Miller & Harrison, LLC
    Miller & Harrison, LLC | David Harrison
    If it was dismissed or if it was a minor drug possession case you may be able to seal the records. Go to Colorado Judicial website, pull down forms menu, click on criminal + find sealing forms.
    Answer Applies to: Colorado
    Replied: 6/30/2011
    Craig W. Elhart, P.C.
    Craig W. Elhart, P.C. | Craig Elhart
    If it is more than 5 years since the conviction, and there is only one conviction, and it otherwise meets the statutory requirements, you can file a motion with the Court were the conviction was asking for an expungement. The statute and court rules must be strictly complied with. It is then up to the discretion of the Court whether to grant or deny the motion.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 6/30/2011
    Law Office of Barry Melton
    Law Office of Barry Melton | Barry Melton
    In California, you cannot exactly get a felony "expunged." If you qualify, you can petition the Court obtain a "Certificate of Rehabilitation," which helps restore your rights to some degree (but it will not restore your right to own a firearm or sit on a jury). Only a gubernatorial pardon will completely restore the rights of someone convicted of a felony; and pardons are rarely issued by California governors - and you can't even apply for a pardon without first obtaining a Certificate of Rehabilitation.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 6/30/2011
    Law Office of Tracey S. Sang
    Law Office of Tracey S. Sang | Tracey Sang
    Not all felonies are expungeable. Assuming yours is, you should first have successfully completed felony probation. If that's done, the expungement is usually a two-step process involving reducing the felony and then expunging it. This can technically be done without an attorney but it should be relatively inexpensive to hire an attorney to do it. It is a common procedure.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 6/30/2011
    Law Office of Jeff Yeh
    Law Office of Jeff Yeh | Jeff Yeh
    You need an attorney to first file a 17b motion to reduce the felony to a misdemeanor. If granted, then the attorney can proceed to petition the court to expunge the misdemeanor.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 6/30/2011
    Law Offices of Phil Hache
    Law Offices of Phil Hache | Phil Hache
    The start of the process includes petitioning the court that the conviction was in. I can assist you in further detail, but would like to find out more about your case to determine if your conviction is eligible for expungement (not all felonies are). Particularly, what was the conviction for and did you get sentenced to state prison?
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 7/11/2013
    California Criminal Defense Center
    California Criminal Defense Center | Ardalon Fakhimi
    The fastest and most effective way is to have a qualified lawyer file a 1203.4 motion and to schedule a court date for your motion to be heard. Alternatively, a petition can be filed on your behalf which typically takes much longer.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 6/30/2011
    Law Office of Rankin Johnson IV, LLC
    Law Office of Rankin Johnson IV, LLC | Rankin Johnson IV
    If it's a Class C felony and not a traffic offense or other non-expungeable offense, you can hire a lawyer or find the forms and do it yourself. It's not terribly difficult, but a lawyer can tell you if your specific crime is eligible. The statute is ORS 137.225, which you can find at leg.state.or.us, and it will tell you which crimes are eligible.
    Answer Applies to: Oregon
    Replied: 6/30/2011
    Law Offices of John J. Ferry, Jr.
    Law Offices of John J. Ferry, Jr. | John J. Ferry, Jr.
    A felony conviction generally cannot be expunged. Your only recourse is to seek a pardon from the governor. This is a very long process, but it's not impossible. You should talk with an attorney with experience in this area.
    Answer Applies to: Pennsylvania
    Replied: 6/30/2011
    Frances R. Johnson
    Frances R. Johnson | Frances R. Johnson
    Felony convictions cannot be expunged in Colorado. If there was a felony arrest that was not charged, was dismissed, or an acquittal occurred, the court wherein the record originated can be petitioned for the record to be sealed. The Colorado judicial website, forms tab, has forms that explain how to apply to have a record sealed. Consultation about the specific facts of your situation is the best way to determine what may or may not be done in your situation.
    Answer Applies to: Colorado
    Replied: 6/30/2011
    Austin Legal Services, PLC
    Austin Legal Services, PLC | Jared Austin
    You can retain an attorney who does expungements. It will usually cost anywhere from $1,000 to $2,000 depending on the firm. You can do it yourself and pay a few hundred dollars out-of-pocket expenses. It is a lot of paperwork and you need to obtain copies of your record, your conviction, fingerprinted at the local sheriff's department, etc. Make sure you are eligible first before proceeding.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 6/30/2011
    Klisz Law Office, PLLC
    Klisz Law Office, PLLC | Timothy J. Klisz
    It is a multi step process that should be handled by an attorney.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 7/11/2013
    Law Offices of Karen Kilpatrick
    Law Offices of Karen Kilpatrick | Karen Kilpatrick
    In Florida, you can expunge or seal a felony under certain conditions: 1. No prior sealing or expungements 2. Not currently under court supervision 3. The charges were dropped, dismissed (expunge) or adjudication was withheld (seal) and your charge doesn't appear on the list of ineligible offenses. If you're eligible, you'll have to meet the statutory requirements, obtain a certificate of eligibility, and petition the court.
    Answer Applies to: Florida
    Replied: 6/30/2011
    Law Offices of Elliott Zarabi
    Law Offices of Elliott Zarabi | Elliott Zarabi
    First, thing, did you serve any prison time? If so, you cannot get it expunged. Did you violate probation? In short you will have to petition the court to expunge it. Why are you trying to get it expunged? Sometimes, its not even worth getting it expunged.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 7/11/2013
    Rothstein Law PLLC
    Rothstein Law PLLC | Eric Rothstein
    If its a NY State conviction, you can't.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 7/11/2013
Click to View More Answers:
12 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Free Legal QuestionsConnect with a local attorney