How can I get my case dropped because the victims do not want to press charges against me? 5 Answers as of December 17, 2013

I am being charged with residential burglary and the victims in my case are my mother and step dad and they both do not even want to press charges against me. And my mother has even showed up to every court hearing. I have had so far to speak up on my behalf and has told the D.A and my public defender that they do not want to press charges against me at all and for my case to be dropped.

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Austin Legal Services, PLC
Austin Legal Services, PLC | Jared Austin
Contrary to popular belief, it is not up to the victims to press charges. That decision lies solely with the prosecutor and the prosecutor alone. While it is not ideal, they can proceed with a reluctant or hesitant victim. They can request a meeting with the supervising prosecutor and ask that the charges be dismissed and state the reason why, but in the end, it will be up to the prosecutor's office on whether or not they decide to continue the case.
Answer Applies to: Michigan
Replied: 12/17/2013
Law Office of Jeff Yeh
Law Office of Jeff Yeh | Jeff Yeh
It doesn't work like that. Prosecutors will never drop charges just because the victim has had a change of heart/story. The fact is, in 95% of all domestic cases the parties reconcile, and prosecutors are well aware of this. You need a good lawyer.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 12/17/2013
Charles M. Schiff, Attorney at Law
Charles M. Schiff, Attorney at Law | Charles M. Schiff
Your parents do not have the authority to "drop charges". Your parents have registered their desire to have the case dropped. This is all they can do. Once the police were called, the state became the complaining party.
Answer Applies to: Minnesota
Replied: 12/13/2013
Tricia Dwyer, Esq. & Associates PLLC
Tricia Dwyer, Esq. & Associates PLLC | Tricia Dwyer, Esq.
You should be conferring with your attorney so she/he can assist you and advise you. If for some reason you do not feel a sense of trust in your attorney you may change attorneys with court approval.
Answer Applies to: Minnesota
Replied: 12/13/2013
Ascheman & Smith | Landon Ascheman
You need to talk to your attorney about this situation.
Answer Applies to: Minnesota
Replied: 12/13/2013
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