How can I get insurance after a drunk driving charge? 30 Answers as of July 09, 2013

I've recently been charged with drunk driving and subsequently my parents have dropped me from their insurance policy. I need to get insurance myself now so I was wondering if I had to disclose that information to an insurance company before I've been convicted of anything? All the lawyers I have talked to say that I will get several forms of conditional licenses, so basically I'm just wondering the best way to go about getting insurance.

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Cornish, Crowley, Rockafellow, & Sartz, PLLC
Cornish, Crowley, Rockafellow, & Sartz, PLLC | Jacob Peter Sartz IV
Anyone charged is presumed innocent until proven guilty. The prosecutor would need to prove any allegations beyond a reasonable doubt. I'd recommend carefully reading the fine print of any potential application for insurance and disclosing what they ask. If you attempt to withhold the information and if they find out, the consequences may be worse.
Answer Applies to: Michigan
Replied: 10/5/2011
Thomas J. Tomko Attorney At law
Thomas J. Tomko Attorney At law | Thomas J. Tomko
Thank you for your inquiry After you were given a ticket for drunk driving, a notation was placed on your driving record indicating that you have a drunk driving offense going on. Therefore, even if you do not tell the insurance company, they will know I hope that this was helpful.
Answer Applies to: Michigan
Replied: 9/16/2011
Law Office of Phillip Weiser
Law Office of Phillip Weiser | Phillip L. Weiser
You should just contact a number of insurance companies to see what they require. I can't answer for them.
Answer Applies to: Kansas
Replied: 9/16/2011
Law Offices of Jeffery A. Cojocar, PC
Law Offices of Jeffery A. Cojocar, PC | Jeffery A. Cojocar
Apply but you will be hit with much higher rates.
Answer Applies to: Michigan
Replied: 7/9/2013
Palumbo and Kosofsky
Palumbo and Kosofsky | Michael Palumbo
You can get insurance, you just have to pay a high premium. It will void a policy to lie on an application for insurance and may even be a crime so don't do that.
Answer Applies to: New York
Replied: 9/16/2011
    Law Office of Richard Williams
    Law Office of Richard Williams | Richard Williams
    You should always disclose to an insurance company all information about you that they requet. If you make false statements to them to secure insurance, and they insure you,and something happens that they are called upon to pay a claim or defend you, they can claim that you secured their services by fradulent means and it may void your insurance contract. You can still get insurance from various carriers, which may be more expensive with less coverage, and lesser know insurance providers.
    Answer Applies to: Alabama
    Replied: 9/15/2011
    Craig W. Elhart, P.C.
    Craig W. Elhart, P.C. | Craig Elhart
    You are considered innocent until found guilty. Being charged is not the same as a conviction. However, if you are convicted, that conviction will be part of your master driving record and be available to any insurance company. Because Michigan is a no-fault state, you must have insurance to operate a motor vehicle. Insurance will be available to you, the questions will be at what cost. Many people convicted of OWI find that they have to obtain insurance through the high risk pool at substantial cost.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 9/15/2011
    Cynthia Henley, Lawyer
    Cynthia Henley, Lawyer | Cynthia Henley
    Don't know what you mean by "conditional license". If your license is suspended, then you might be able to get a judge to grant you an occupational license which allows you to drive for work, school, and living necessities but you must have insurance. The insurance company can easily learn about your DWI and if you do not disclose it, then they can drop you and possibly deny claims if you or someone files on your insurance.
    Answer Applies to: Texas
    Replied: 9/15/2011
    Law Office of Richard Southard
    Law Office of Richard Southard | Richard C Southard
    Whether you have to disclose it depends on the questions asked on the insurance application. While it's pending you can answer that you have not been convicted but if they ask if you have been charged, you must answer honestly. In all likelihood, if you are convicted DMV will notify your insurance carrier eventually and they will drop you or raise your rates significantly. Have you already hired an experienced defense attorney yet?
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 9/15/2011
    Law Office of Thomas A. Medford, Jr., PC
    Law Office of Thomas A. Medford, Jr., PC | Thomas A. Medford, Jr.
    DC has "assigned risk" insurance for individuals who have been convicted of DUI. The rates are generally higher and the coverage amounts is at the minimal amount for the jurisdiction. In the case of the District of Columbia that would be 25,000/50,000. In regard to your question about how much to reveal to an insurance company you should correctly answer their questions but you do not have to volunteer information that was not asked for.
    Answer Applies to: District of Columbia
    Replied: 9/15/2011
    Anderson Law Office
    Anderson Law Office | Scott L. Anderson
    You certainly must disclose your DUI if asked, usually an insurance company will run your driving record before quoting any amount.
    Answer Applies to: Minnesota
    Replied: 9/15/2011
    Law Office of Jared Altman
    Law Office of Jared Altman | Jared Altman
    You haven't been convicted yet so get insurance. But, once you are convicted your premium will go through the roof.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 9/15/2011
    The Law Office of Harry E. Hudson, Jr.
    The Law Office of Harry E. Hudson, Jr. | Harry E. Hudson, Jr.
    What you are really asking is can you fail to discliose a material fact to the insurance company to get coverage at a lower rate. That might be considered fraud. If done over the phone or throught the mails or on line, it could be prosecuted both federally and by the state. A failure to disclose could aslo result in fi=utere denial of coverage on a claim.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 9/15/2011
    Timothy J. Thill P.C.
    Timothy J. Thill P.C. | Timothy J. Thill
    It is always best to be honest and answer the questions posed when applying for insurance. You can apply for insurance with any agency or company directly. Tell them you were arrested, but have not been convicted of anything.
    Answer Applies to: Illinois
    Replied: 9/15/2011
    Lawrence Lewis
    Lawrence Lewis | Lawrence Lewis, PC
    The best way to go about getting insurance is to lie to the insurance company about the DUi arrest, because when they learn that you have been arrested for DUI, your rates will be high. Of course once the insurance company learns that you have lied to them, you will be dropped anyway. Your other alternative, be candid with insurance comapnay and be quoted a rate that you might only be barely able to afford. A third, drive without insurance. Those are your three alternatives. They are suck, but they are all yours. You pick the best one. Good luck.
    Answer Applies to: Georgia
    Replied: 9/15/2011
    Law Offices of John Carney
    Law Offices of John Carney | John Carney
    You should not tell the insurance company unless they ask. They will do a record check and your insurance will be very expensive, especially if you are under 23. The best way to shop for insurance is to call the top 10 companies and get a quote.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 9/15/2011
    Law Office of Joe Dane
    Law Office of Joe Dane | Joe Dane
    They're going to run your DMV history as part of their issuance of a policy, so it's going to get found out. As a condition of your probation (and required by the DMV), you'll need to have a current SR-22 (proof of insurance) on file with the DMV. It's automatically transmitted by your insurance company so if you miss a payment or are cancelled for any reason, they notify DMV and your license will get suspended for failure to keep up the insurance. Your best bet is to shop around for the best rate you can, including checking with companies that claim to insure "hard to insure" drivers, such as those with DUI convictions. Ask your attorney if they have a local insurance broker they can steer you to, but it may take some time on Google to find a decent rate with the DUI.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 9/15/2011
    Law Offices of Martina A. Vigil, PC
    Law Offices of Martina A. Vigil, PC | Martina A. Vigil
    I think the best way to go is by getting an SR22. This can save you thousands of dollars rather than staying on your current insurance policy. Trey Roberts gives great deals on this type of insurance.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 9/15/2011
    Michael Breczinski
    Michael Breczinski | Michael Breczinski
    Check with several insurance agents and they will be able to give you quotes. Shop around.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 7/9/2013
    Mark Thiessen, Attorney at Law
    Mark Thiessen, Attorney at Law | Mark Thiessen
    Just call an insurance company. It is their duty to find out that stuff. Usually, they can see it from your driving record. But a conviction doesn't automatically preclude you from being eligible, so just call around. You may have to get an SR-22 for any occupational licenses. I can advise you on those in Houston.
    Answer Applies to: Texas
    Replied: 9/15/2011
    John Segelbaum, P.S.
    John Segelbaum, P.S. | John Segelbaum
    You don't need any special insurance at this point. However, if your license gets suspended by DOL or as the result of a conviction, you will need your insurance comapny to file SR22 which means high risk insurance rates.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 9/15/2011
    Law Office of Jeff Yeh
    Law Office of Jeff Yeh | Jeff Yeh
    The best thing you can do is to try and beat the DUI charge, instead of worrying about what happens afterwards. You've got the wrong priorty.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 9/15/2011
    Law Offices of Phil Hache
    Law Offices of Phil Hache | Phil Hache
    There are some insurance companies that are able to actually get insurance for their clients cheaper after getting a DUI than what their premiums were before. It sounds ridiculous, but it can happen.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 9/15/2011
    Betts Legal Services
    Betts Legal Services | Shawn M. Betts
    In Minnesota, even if you haven't been convicted of the charge, as soon as you take a test that results in a reading over .08 or more, or if you refused to take a test, then the revocation is placed on your driver's license(after a brief waiting period). If you have not challenged the revocation w/in 30 days, the revocation will be there permanently, and the insurance company will see it when they run your record. If you have a revocation and don't report it on an application, then you are committing insurance fraud. You should just disclose it when applying, because the company will almost always see it sooner or later. Unfortunately you will have to pay higher rates than others, but you should be able to find a company that will insure you.
    Answer Applies to: Minnesota
    Replied: 9/15/2011
    Austin Legal Services, PLC
    Austin Legal Services, PLC | Jared Austin
    That is really up to the insurance company. A lot of people have DUIs and most of them are still able to get insurance. You will be paying more for it, but you can still get it. Be honest with them because usually they make you swear under penalty of perjury that you are being honest on your applications. You don't need to add more legal troubles to your situation. Shop around at different companies and see which ones will offer you the best deal.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 9/15/2011
    San Diego DUI Law Center
    San Diego DUI Law Center | Rick Mueller
    Everything you need to know about insurance & SR-22 http://www.sandiegoduilawyer.com/articles/secrets-of-sr-22-insurance.html.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 7/9/2013
    Law Office of Daniel K Martin
    Law Office of Daniel K Martin | Daniel K Martin
    In California once you have been convicted you will have to get SR-22 insurance. You should disclose the situation with an insurance broker who can help you decide the best way to go right now.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 9/15/2011
    Law Office of Thomas F. Mueller
    Law Office of Thomas F. Mueller | Thomas Mueller
    You have no duty to disclose the DUI unless asked. But they will ask and will drop you if you don't answer truthfully. There are companies that will take you.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 9/15/2011
    Robert Mortland
    Robert Mortland | Law Office of Robert Mortland
    You will have to get SR22 insurance. You can call almost any insurance agency and get the SR22 insurance. This type of insurance is an additional bond ($35,000) on top of the insurance that you currently have.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 9/15/2011
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