How can I get a divorce if I am no longer a resident in the state where I got married? 22 Answers as of May 05, 2014

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Law Offices of Frances Headley | Frances Headley
Regardless of where you married, you file for dissolution in the state in which you reside when the relationship breaks up.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 5/5/2014
Law Office of Brent R. Chipman
Law Office of Brent R. Chipman | Brent R. Chipman
You can file for a divorce in the state where you were married if your spouse still resides there. Otherwise, you can file for a divorce in the state where your spouse resides at the present time. You may be able to file in the state where you currently reside if there is a basis for that court to have jurisdiction over your spouse. That could include if you have children together that are residing with you, if you and your spouse ever lived in your current state, or if the grounds for divorce occurred in the state where you are living.
Answer Applies to: Utah
Replied: 5/2/2014
Fran Brochstein
Fran Brochstein | Fran Brochstein
You file where you live now not where you married.
Answer Applies to: Texas
Replied: 5/2/2014
James M. Chandler | James M. Chandler
You should be able to get the dissolution in the State you now live in.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 5/2/2014
Law Offices of Lauren H. Kane | Lauren H. Kane
You have to file in the state in which you are a resident.
Answer Applies to: Pennsylvania
Replied: 5/2/2014
    Grace Law Offices of John F Geraghty Jr.
    Grace Law Offices of John F Geraghty Jr. | John F. Geraghty, Jr.
    You file in the state where you are a resident.
    Answer Applies to: Georgia
    Replied: 5/2/2014
    Diane l. Berger | Diane L. Berger
    You file for divorce in the state where you currently reside.
    Answer Applies to: Nebraska
    Replied: 5/2/2014
    J. Barbour Rixey, P.C.
    J. Barbour Rixey, P.C. | J. Barbour Rixey
    Where you got married makes no difference on where you get divorced. If you have established residency in the state where you live for a certain period of time then you can file for divorce in the state where you live. In VA you have to live here for 6 months prior to filing for divorce.
    Answer Applies to: Virginia
    Replied: 5/2/2014
    Law Office of Robert E McCall | Robert McCall
    File in your current state of residence, that is controlling.
    Answer Applies to: Florida
    Replied: 5/2/2014
    Peyton and Associates | Barbara Peyton
    You can file for divorce where you are now a resident.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 5/2/2014
    The Houser Law Firm, P.C.
    The Houser Law Firm, P.C. | A. Bowden Houser
    What does that have to do with it? Presumably you reside somewhere so check your eligibility to file for divorce in the various jurisdictions you may be eligible to file in based on your current residency and your spouse's residency and file in the jurisdiction you prefer.
    Answer Applies to: North Carolina
    Replied: 5/2/2014
    Law Office of Joan M. Canavan | Joan Canavan
    You can get a divorce in Massachusetts after you have been living here for 6 months. I am not sure about other states.
    Answer Applies to: Massachusetts
    Replied: 5/2/2014
    Law Office of L. Paul Zahn
    Law Office of L. Paul Zahn | Paul Zahn
    You can file in the state you are a resident of at the time you seek a divorce. In California, the requirement is that you be a resident of the State of California for six months before filing for divorce, and a resident of the County in which you file for at least 3 months. Even if you don't meet the residency requirement, a work around is possible that will allow you to file now.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 5/2/2014
    GordenLaw, LLC
    GordenLaw, LLC | Vanessa J. Gorden
    You do not have to get divorced in the state where you were married. No matter where you were married, you can file for divorce in your actual state of residence once you have met that state (the state where you live)'s requirements. For example, no matter where you were married, if you have established residency in Nebraska and lived here for more than one year, you can file for divorce and Nebraska can grant you a divorce. This becomes slightly more complicated if your spouse is still located in another state, but an attorney can help explain how to best address that as well.
    Answer Applies to: Nebraska
    Replied: 5/2/2014
    Attorney at Law | Aimee C. Robbins
    You only have to be a resident of this State for one year immediately preceding the filing of your Complaint for Divorce. It matters not that you were married in another state.
    Answer Applies to: Maryland
    Replied: 5/2/2014
    John Russo | John Russo
    By getting a divorce in the new state you are a resident.
    Answer Applies to: Rhode Island
    Replied: 5/2/2014
    Provda Law Firm
    Provda Law Firm | Bruce Provda
    You would get it in the state where you are now a resident.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 5/2/2014
    Mediation Services of Southwest Florida
    Mediation Services of Southwest Florida | Dennis J. Leffert, J.D.
    I think, but you will have to confirm, that you may file for divorce within the State and County where your spouse is a resident. I am not certain, so be sure to contact the proper Court and ask that question before proceeding. Good luck.
    Answer Applies to: Florida
    Replied: 5/1/2014
    John Ceci PLLC
    John Ceci PLLC | John Ceci
    By meeting the requirements the state you currently reside in.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 5/1/2014
    Smith Law | Sharon K Smith
    Hire a lawyer in that State, or wait until you attain residency status in your new State and file it there.
    Answer Applies to: Pennsylvania
    Replied: 5/1/2014
    Family Law & Mediation Services, LLC | Carol Jean Romine
    You don't have to be a resident in the state in which you got married. Each state has residency requirements for obtaining a divorce. In Indiana, you have to live in the State for 6 months prior to filing for divorce, and you have to live in the County you file in for 3 months prior to filing.
    Answer Applies to: Indiana
    Replied: 5/1/2014
    Law Offices of Arlene D. Kock
    Law Offices of Arlene D. Kock | Arlene D. Kock
    File in the jurisdiction where you currently reside.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 5/1/2014
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