How can I find out if have I lost my lawful permanent resident status or am I a still a resident? 11 Answers as of September 07, 2012

I obtained my permanent residency in 1974 and left the US in 97. I would like to go back to the US to work. Can I do so? I also have a social securty number given to me in 1977.

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Law Offices of Svetlana Boukhny
Law Offices of Svetlana Boukhny | Svetlana Boukhny
If you have been out of the US since 1997, you have lost your permanent resident status.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 9/7/2012
Law Office of Bijal Jani | Bijal Jani
From the information you gave, it appears that you surrendered your permanent residency in the USA. The immigration laws require a permanent resident to maintain residency in the USA. You would have to reapply for permanent residency.
Answer Applies to: New York
Replied: 8/16/2012
World Esquire Law Firm
World Esquire Law Firm | Aime Katambwe
In 1974, the PRCard did not have an expiration date. You could keep them for life. Arguably, your PRC is still valid so that an argument can be made that you are still a resident. Be aware though, an argument can be made convincingly the other way as well.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 8/16/2012
Universal Law Group, Inc. | Francis John Cowhig
If I am reading your question correctly, you appear to have been out of the U.S. since 1997. If this is true, you will have been deemed to have abandoned your green card and permanent residence status in 1998. You cannot be out the U.S. for more than 1 year. In all likelihood, you will have to have someone petition you for an immigrant visa again, before you will be able to permanently remain in the U.S. I strongly suggest that you or a relative in the U.S. contact an experienced immigration attorney for a face-to-face consultation and give him/her all of the facts surrounding your situation. He/she would then be in a better position to analyze you case and advise you of your options.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 8/16/2012
Law Offices of Brian D. Lerner, A PC
Law Offices of Brian D. Lerner, A PC | Brian David Lerner
No. After leaving the U.S for 1 year, you can no longer enter on the green card. You must reapply.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 8/16/2012
    Law Office of Rebecca White
    Law Office of Rebecca White | Rebecca White
    If you have not been back to the United States since 1997 you will have abandoned your permanent resident status. If you were a child and your parents naturalized, it may be that you gained derivative citizenship. Most likely you will need to find a way to become a resident again, or secure a work visa.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 8/16/2012
    Mayo Mallette PLLC
    Mayo Mallette PLLC | Thomas J. Rosser
    You have lost your lawful permanent resident status (LPR) by virtue of "abandonment" by having lived permanently outside the United States since 1997 and not having solicited a "re-entry permit" prior to that initial departure (which could have helped you preserve your LPR status for at least the initial two-year period in which you lived abroad and, possibly, subsequently, depending upon your particular circumstances).
    Answer Applies to: Mississippi
    Replied: 8/16/2012
    Law Office of Pho Ethan Tran PLLC
    Law Office of Pho Ethan Tran PLLC | Pho Ethan Tran
    If you have been outside of the US in excess of 1 year, there is a presumption that you have abandoned your residency unless you have a very good reason for not returning earlier. Whether or not you will be permitted to reenter the US as a resident, will depend on the officer at the border.
    Answer Applies to: Texas
    Replied: 8/16/2012
    Baughman & Wang
    Baughman & Wang | Justin X. Wang
    US Immigration will consider you have abandoned your green card. If you try to return, you may be placed in removal proceedings at the point of entry.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 8/16/2012
    Frazier, Soloway & Poorak, P.C.
    Frazier, Soloway & Poorak, P.C. | David Nabow Soloway
    Generally, a Permanent Resident who has been absent from the U.S. for fifteen years should expect to be treated as if he/she had abandoned his residence in the U.S. and consequently abandoned his Permanent Resident status. Having a Social Security Number does not change this.
    Answer Applies to: Georgia
    Replied: 8/16/2012
    Law Offices of Grinberg and Segal
    Law Offices of Grinberg and Segal | Alexander Segal
    You are presumed to have abandoned your lawful permanent residence after remaining outside the United States for more than a year. You would need to reapply for permanent residence or obtain another type of visa that would allow you to work.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 8/16/2012
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