Does pleading guilty to a charge prevent any job opportunity for me? 54 Answers as of July 09, 2013

I pleaded guilty to a charge. Can that prevent any job opportunity for me?

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Edward  D. Dowling IV Attorney at Law
Edward D. Dowling IV Attorney at Law | Edward D. Dowling IV
That dpends upon what you plead to, but generally if you only plead to misdemeanors and not to felonies it should not prevent you from getting a job although it could. Also if the job application form asks if you were convicted of a crime you would have to answer yes.
Answer Applies to: New York
Replied: 10/28/2011
Cornish, Crowley, Rockafellow, & Sartz, PLLC
Cornish, Crowley, Rockafellow, & Sartz, PLLC | Jacob Peter Sartz IV
No, a guilty plea and conviction does not ban employment. However, certain prospective employers may review and value that information differently. Ultimately, it's a matter of employer discretion. The worst thing, though, would be to hide the conviction if asked because it is fairly easy to run a background check.
Answer Applies to: Michigan
Replied: 10/5/2011
Reza Athari & Associates, PLLC | Riana Durrett
Criminal convictions can decrease a persons likelihood of finding employment, but that will depend on what the charges are, what your qualifications are, how the potential employer views the particular conviction, etc.
Answer Applies to: Nevada
Replied: 9/19/2011
Law Offices of Sean Logue
Law Offices of Sean Logue | Sean Logue
Yes. Some employers won't hire people w/ criminal records.
Answer Applies to: Pennsylvania
Replied: 9/19/2011
D T Pham Associates, PLLC
D T Pham Associates, PLLC | Duncan T Pham
It's not the plea, it's the conviction and record thereof that may prevent you from applying for certain jobs.
Answer Applies to: Texas
Replied: 9/16/2011
    Thomas J. Tomko Attorney At law
    Thomas J. Tomko Attorney At law | Thomas J. Tomko
    Thank you for your inquiry Certain convictions can be the basis for a denial of employment. Of course, it will depend on the job and the employer, so the question cannot be answered in a general way I hope that this was helpful.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 9/16/2011
    Law Office of Daniel K Martin
    Law Office of Daniel K Martin | Daniel K Martin
    If it was a felony there are many jobs that you will be ineligible for without expungement. Some misdemeanors will prevent you from getting some jobs.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 9/16/2011
    Reeves Law Firm, P.C.
    Reeves Law Firm, P.C. | Roy L. Reeves
    Absolutely. Whether you plea guilty to a charge or go to trial and are found guilty, the affect is the same. You have a criminal record. The type of crime charged may affect your ability to get a job, if it is a Felony, it will affect your ability to own a gun, vote, etc. as well. If it is a Class C misdemeanor (ticket/fine only offense, then it may have some affect, but little, the caveat being if you are a professional driver and the ticket is for reckless driving or something similar).
    Answer Applies to: Texas
    Replied: 9/16/2011
    Jules N. Fiani, Attorney at Law
    Jules N. Fiani, Attorney at Law | Jules Fiani
    Maybe. It depends on the employer.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 7/9/2013
    Law Offices of Jeffery A. Cojocar, PC
    Law Offices of Jeffery A. Cojocar, PC | Jeffery A. Cojocar
    Yes, depending on the employer.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 7/9/2013
    The Law Office of Cindy Barton
    The Law Office of Cindy Barton | Cindy Barton
    That depends on what you do for a living and what you plead guilty to.For example if you have a license like teacher or nurse anything to do with violence, child abuse or fraud may revoke your license.If you are a doctor even substance abuse may suspend your license.Be very careful with the things that you do and the affect they may have on your life.You really should have spoken to a lawyer about the consequences of your plea.Good luck.
    Answer Applies to: Utah
    Replied: 9/16/2011
    Palumbo and Kosofsky
    Palumbo and Kosofsky | Michael Palumbo
    A criminal record can cause an employer to not hire you.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 9/16/2011
    Law Office of Richard Williams
    Law Office of Richard Williams | Richard Williams
    Depends on wht you plead guilty to. If you plead guilty to a felony charge you lose the right to vote or hold public office. Additionally, you may forfeit for a period of time certain federal or state benefits. You will lose your right to own or possess a firearm. You may lose your driving privileges. If you are guilty of a misdemeanor involving domestic violence you will forever lose your right to own or possess a firearm. If convicted of DUI, you may lose your right to drive and you may be uninsurable by automobile liability companies. Many companies will not hire an individual if they are convicted of a crime involving moral turpitude if they are required to deal or have contact with the general public. It has been my experience that a conviction of any type has an effect on hiring as employers in many cases are not willing to take a second chance on some applicants for jobs. Jobs are hard enough to find even with a spotless record.
    Answer Applies to: Alabama
    Replied: 9/16/2011
    Law Office of Phillip Weiser
    Law Office of Phillip Weiser | Phillip L. Weiser
    Yes it could, depending upon the specific job you wish to obtain.
    Answer Applies to: Kansas
    Replied: 9/16/2011
    Austin Legal Services, PLC
    Austin Legal Services, PLC | Jared Austin
    Depends on what the charge is. Is it a misdemeanor or a felony? Is it a crime of dishonesty or is it a crime of violence? It would also depend on the employer and what type of job it is. That is an issue you need to take up with the potential employer.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 9/16/2011
    Craig W. Elhart, P.C.
    Craig W. Elhart, P.C. | Craig Elhart
    An employer can obtain a copy of your criminal record. Whether that would prevent you from being hired would be up to the individual employer.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 9/15/2011
    Harrison & Harrison
    Harrison & Harrison | Samuel Harrison
    A disorderly conduct or a bad check shouldn't be a problem. Theft from an employer, DUI especially on the job, or a violent crime will keep you out of a lot of jobs.
    Answer Applies to: Georgia
    Replied: 9/15/2011
    Healan Law Offices
    Healan Law Offices | William D. Healan, III
    Yes, it could prevent you from getting a job.
    Answer Applies to: Georgia
    Replied: 9/15/2011
    Gregory Casale Attorney at Law
    Gregory Casale Attorney at Law | Gregory Casale
    It doesn't necessarily prevent future employment but it certainly will not help. Speak with your attorney about this.
    Answer Applies to: Massachusetts
    Replied: 9/15/2011
    Law Office of Robert Sisson | Robert Sisson
    It could depending on the particular job opportunity. Employers can basically hire who they want based on qualifications and standards for a particular job.
    Answer Applies to: Wisconsin
    Replied: 9/15/2011
    Law Office of Tracey S. Sang
    Law Office of Tracey S. Sang | Tracey Sang
    You're not giving me much information to go on, but I would say the short answer is yes. Most applications ask if you have been convicted of a crime and most background checks are looking for exactly that.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 9/15/2011
    Law Office of Jonathan T. Sarre
    Law Office of Jonathan T. Sarre | Jonathan T. Sarre
    It would depend on what the crime is and what the job is.
    Answer Applies to: Oregon
    Replied: 6/24/2013
    Connell-Savela
    Connell-Savela | Jason Savela
    Well, that depends on the charge plead to and what job you are looking to get. I have former clients with every kind of conviction (many prior to meeting me) that have jobs.
    Answer Applies to: Colorado
    Replied: 9/15/2011
    Cynthia Henley, Lawyer
    Cynthia Henley, Lawyer | Cynthia Henley
    Of course. It depends on the charge and it depends on the type of job but you can guess that having a criminal case on your background would not help you .
    Answer Applies to: Texas
    Replied: 9/15/2011
    Klisz Law Office, PLLC
    Klisz Law Office, PLLC | Timothy J. Klisz
    Absolutely.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 9/15/2011
    Law Office of Richard Southard
    Law Office of Richard Southard | Richard C Southard
    The answer is "It depends." It depends on what job and what you are convicted of. For example, I don't imagine you would be hired in the finance or banking field if you have been convicted of theft or fraud but you may be hired having been convicted of a marijuana charge. Certain jobs such as police officer, military and other governmental jobs, as well as those requiring licenses also have restrictions relating to criminal record. You need to be more specific to get a more accurate answer. Legal disclaimer: All answers are for information purposes only. Answering this question or any future questions does not form any attorney-client relationship. Be mindful, that answers are limited by the limited facts presented by the questioner and are not meant to take the place of competent legal advice by an attorney fully informed of all the facts surrounding your case. However, be aware that nothing posted in a public forum such as this can be deemed confidential or privileged communication.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 9/15/2011
    Watkins Law Office
    Watkins Law Office | Bob Watkins
    Felony or misdemeanor? And depends on what type of job you are seeking. A criminal record certainly does not enhance employment opportunities.
    Answer Applies to: New Hampshire
    Replied: 9/15/2011
    Anderson Law Office
    Anderson Law Office | Scott L. Anderson
    It certainly may, depending on the type of job and the type of conviction.
    Answer Applies to: Minnesota
    Replied: 9/15/2011
    Law Office of Jared Altman
    Law Office of Jared Altman | Jared Altman
    Depends on the job and the charge.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 9/15/2011
    The Law Office of Harry E. Hudson, Jr.
    The Law Office of Harry E. Hudson, Jr. | Harry E. Hudson, Jr.
    You have asked 2 questions. Pleading guilty does not prohibit employment but can make empployment very difficult.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 9/15/2011
    Laguzzi Law, P.C.
    Laguzzi Law, P.C. | Carina Laguzzi
    It depends on the job and depends on the charge.
    Answer Applies to: Pennsylvania
    Replied: 6/24/2013
    Law Offices of Karen Kilpatrick
    Law Offices of Karen Kilpatrick | Karen Kilpatrick
    It depends on the outcome of the case. If you received a withholding of adjudication, you should consider having the charge sealed so it doesn't show up on background checks. It is likely more difficult to obtain employment with a criminal record, although not impossible so best of luck!
    Answer Applies to: Florida
    Replied: 9/15/2011
    Law Office of Edward J. Blum
    Law Office of Edward J. Blum | Edward J. Blum
    It depends on the job and the crime.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 9/15/2011
    Law Offices of John Carney
    Law Offices of John Carney | John Carney
    It is always more difficult to get a good job or career with a criminal conviction, but many companies will overlook a minor conviction for a qualified applicant.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 9/15/2011
    Michael Maltby, Attorney at Law
    Michael Maltby, Attorney at Law | Michael Maltby
    Any criminal conviction cfan have dire connsequences on future employment and some crimes are obviously more of a problem than others. Make sure before you plead you have fully discussed the particulars with a lawyer.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 9/15/2011
    Law Office of Eric Sterkenburg
    Law Office of Eric Sterkenburg | Eric Sterkenburg
    That depends on if the charge was a felony or a misdemeanor. It also depends on what the charge was for. You will have to disclose the fact if asked on a job interview or application. Regardless of what you plead to it will not help in getting a job.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 9/15/2011
    Law Office of Joe Dane
    Law Office of Joe Dane | Joe Dane
    That's not a legal question, but one for whatever employer you're applying to. Employers can ask about convictions on your record as well as pending charges. If these are old cases you're talking about, you can contact a local criminal defense attorney and look into what's commonly called an "expungement" - a dismissal of old cases that allow you to not have to disclose them. There are certain situations where even a dismissed case must be disclosed - your lawyer can assess your situation and advise you from there.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 9/15/2011
    Law Offices of Martina A. Vigil, PC
    Law Offices of Martina A. Vigil, PC | Martina A. Vigil
    Yes. Pleading guilty to a charge gives you a criminal record if you have never had one before. This can make certain employers weary of hiring you.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 9/15/2011
    Law Offices of James A Bates
    Law Offices of James A Bates | James A Bates
    That depends on the charge. If you got convicted of a felony, you will be precluded from getting many sorts of jobs, especially those that require a state license. Private employers will also be reluctant to hire a convicted felon. It is up to the employers. If you pled to a misdemeanor, things are a bit better. It depends on what crime you pled to. If it involved theft, that closes lots of doors.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 9/15/2011
    Michael Breczinski
    Michael Breczinski | Michael Breczinski
    No but depending on the type of charge it may limit your ability to get a job. For example retail stores do not like to hire convicted thieves.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 9/15/2011
    Andersen Law PLLC
    Andersen Law PLLC | Craig Andersen
    Can you ask a vaguer question? It depends on the crime and the job you may want following your plea.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 9/15/2011
    Mark Thiessen, Attorney at Law
    Mark Thiessen, Attorney at Law | Mark Thiessen
    Absolutely. It depends on the job and the charge. Some jobs don't care about certain criminal convictions. I need a lot more info to advise you.
    Answer Applies to: Texas
    Replied: 9/15/2011
    John Segelbaum, P.S.
    John Segelbaum, P.S. | John Segelbaum
    If you plead guilty, you will be convicted and that could exclude you from some employment. J
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 9/15/2011
    Halprin Law Office
    Halprin Law Office | Richard Halprin
    Yes, it could, especially if theft or violence was involved.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 9/15/2011
    Betts Legal Services
    Betts Legal Services | Shawn M. Betts
    Having any type of conviction on your record can possibly prevent employers from hiring you. You will want to be sure what type of sentence you received to be certain that the charge will appear on a background check, and if it does, you may want to try to consider an expungement at some point to try and get the conviction sealed.
    Answer Applies to: Minnesota
    Replied: 9/15/2011
    Jason Overton, Attorney at Law
    Jason Overton, Attorney at Law | Jason Overton
    A guilty plea is a conviction for whatever you're pleading to, just as if you had went to trial and been found guilty. People normally plead guilty in return for a lighter sentence or a reduced charge or both. Some jobs frown on this, others don't mind. Depends on the job and the crime. If you plead guilty to robbery or theft, you may have a hard time getting a job as a bank teller.
    Answer Applies to: Alabama
    Replied: 9/15/2011
    Law Offices of Phil Hache
    Law Offices of Phil Hache | Phil Hache
    It can potentially be an issue with some employers. When did you get convicted? You may be eligible to get the conviction expunged, and if so that will help with most employers.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 9/15/2011
    Law Offices of Andrew Bouvier-Brown
    Law Offices of Andrew Bouvier-Brown | Andrew J. Bouvier-Brown
    This is too little information to give a reasonable answer, besides "it depends" depends on the type of charge, the type of job, and the type of employer.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 9/15/2011
    Law Offices of Matthew Murillo
    Law Offices of Matthew Murillo | Matthew Murillo
    That depends on the charge and circumstances involved. Without more information, no one knows.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 9/15/2011
    Law Office of Jeff Yeh
    Law Office of Jeff Yeh | Jeff Yeh
    It depends on what charge you plead guilty to.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 6/24/2013
    Law Office of Killain R. Jones
    Law Office of Killain R. Jones | Killain Jones
    A guilty plea can effect your ability to obtain employment depending on what you pled guilty to (i.e. misdemeanor or felony) and the type of employment you are seeking.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 9/15/2011
    Law Office of Michael Brodsky
    Law Office of Michael Brodsky | Michael Brodsky
    The answer, of course, depends on the charge and the job. Felonies are certainly more of an impediment to being hired than are misdemeanors. And certain convictions such as a sex offense or domestic violence, prevent you from being hired for certain jobs. The good news is that many convictions can be vacated. Once a conviction is vacated, the person can answe4r that he or she have not been convicted of that particular crime. Whether your conviction falls into that category depends on the nature of the conviction and how much time has passed.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 9/15/2011
    Freeborn Law Offices, P.S.
    Freeborn Law Offices, P.S. | Steve Freeborn
    It most certainly could. Even a small crime like a shop lift could impact your job opportunities. Not only may pleading guilty effect job opportunities, it could also effect educational opportunities by disqualifying you from attending certain colleges/universities/trade schools, as well as disqualify you from grants, loans, and scholarships. If you wish to consult with my office, please feel free to contact me.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 9/15/2011
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