Does my landlord have a right to enter my home when I am not there without permission? 14 Answers as of January 10, 2014

He has done so on several occasions and once left my front door unlocked. I have told him he can't do this.

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Law Offices of George H. Shers | George H. Shers
In California, a landlord must give the tenant at least 24 hours written notice of when he wishes to enter and there must be some reason for the entry.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 1/9/2014
Universal Law Group, Inc. | Francis John Cowhig
No, unless it's an emergency such as water leaking down to a downstairs apartment. Otherwise he must give you at least 24 hours notice before entering your apartment or home.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 1/9/2014
Law Office of James I. Fisher | James I. Fisher
Read your lease. Does it grant landlord the right to enter without notice? Most leases do not. In general, the landlord does not have this right to enter without your consent, unless and emergency threatening life or safety of someone or the property.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 1/9/2014
Stuart P Gelberg
Stuart P Gelberg | Stuart P Gelberg
Read the lease. Unless it is in the lease, the answer is no.
Answer Applies to: New York
Replied: 1/9/2014
Law Offices of Frances Headley | Frances Headley
You have the right to quiet enjoyment of the home and the landlord can not enter without giving you reasonable notice, usually considered to be at least 24 hours, unless there is an emergency.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 1/9/2014
    S. Joseph Schramm | Joseph Schramm
    Landlords are generally allowed to access a tenant's premises at reasonable times for necessary matters like repairs. Landlords should give their tenants advanced notice of their intentions and arrange a time for entering the tenant's abode and most of them do so. The landlords who do not make advance arrangements set themselves up for problems with their tenants if something is damaged or missing.
    Answer Applies to: Pennsylvania
    Replied: 1/9/2014
    James T. Weiner & Associates, P.C.
    James T. Weiner & Associates, P.C. | James T. Weiner
    Only in cases of emergency.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 1/9/2014
    Ginsberg & Associates | Jacob Ginsberg
    Whether the landlord can come into your home is governed by the lease. If this is a standard TREC form Lease there will be provisions when landlord can enter your premises.
    Answer Applies to: Texas
    Replied: 1/9/2014
    Musilli Brennan Associates PLLC
    Musilli Brennan Associates PLLC | John F Brennan
    I would have to look at your lease or rental agreement to determine whether or not you have granted this permission.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 1/9/2014
    Patrick W. Currin, Attorney at Law | Patrick Currin
    The landlord may enter the property, it is his after all, but must provide reasonable notice.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 1/9/2014
    Law Office of Jack Longert, LLC | Jack Longert
    Not in Wisconsin. State law requires a 24 hour notice in non-emergency situations.
    Answer Applies to: Wisconsin
    Replied: 1/9/2014
    Attorney & Counselor at Law | Jeffrey B. Hammerlund
    It depends on what your lease says.
    Answer Applies to: Illinois
    Replied: 1/10/2014
    Peters Law, PLLC
    Peters Law, PLLC | Mark T. Peters, Sr.
    What does your lease say? If it allows it, then he can. If not, call the police the next time it happens.
    Answer Applies to: Idaho
    Replied: 1/9/2014
    William Bidwell, Attorney at Law | Bill Bidwell
    Landlord can only enter for a maintenance issue or emergency. Landlord should notify you in advance for routine maintenance. Search the Michigan statutes; there may be a provision for landlord entry. Unauthorized entry for no legitimate reason is trespassing.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 1/9/2014
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