Does a charge being dismissed mean you were not convicted? 6 Answers as of July 20, 2012

Almost 10 years ago I was arrested for a check I wrote to keep a roof over my children s head. I was arrested I was in jail less than 1 hour. I had to pay off the check to get out of jail. I never even went to court. On my record it states charges was dismissed. I offered a job on the application I was asked if I was ever convicted of a crime. I answered no. After a background check I was told they were no longer offering me the position because I failed to disclose my convictions. They never asked if I was arrested. Doesn't dismissed mean I was not convicted ?

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Lawrence Lewis
Lawrence Lewis | Lawrence Lewis, PC
It cannot read dismissed and convicted. So, either you got it wrong or the employer got it wrong.
Answer Applies to: Georgia
Replied: 7/20/2012
Darrell B. Reynolds, P.C. | Darrell B. Reynolds
If the all of the charges were dismissed then there is no conviction. I suggest the you get a copy of your GCIC and start there to try and clear the matter up.
Answer Applies to: Georgia
Replied: 7/20/2012
WILLIAM L SANDERS, ATTORNEY AT LAW | William L. Sanders
Your question was directed to me, as an unemployment attorney. It was tagged as a criminal law question. I do not practice criminal law. If your question is if a prospective employer may use this as a basis not to hire you: Yes, they may, so long as they do not do so for a reason that violated your EEOC/discrimination rights: race, age, sex, national origin, religious beliefs, handicap. Otherwise, they may chose not to hire you for this or any other reason. This is GA.
Answer Applies to: Georgia
Replied: 7/20/2012
VANJOHNSON LAW FIRM, LLC
VANJOHNSON LAW FIRM, LLC | Anthony Overton Van Johnson
You indicated that you were arrested ten (10) years ago for a check you wrote. Per your facts, you were required to pay the amount of the check and the charges were dismissed. You subsequently applied for a job and you were turned down as a result of your failure to disclose your conviction. Your question is whether a "dismissal" means that you were not convicted. The answer to your question is as follows: if the charge was dismissed, then there can be no conviction. You should obtain a copy of your criminal history to be sure that your record does not indicate a conviction. Occasionally, when people are incarcerated, they enter into plea deals with the State to resolve a case to enable them to be released from custody. You should also check to make sure that you didn't enter into a plea deal which resulted in a conviction.
Answer Applies to: Georgia
Replied: 7/20/2012
Healan Law Offices
Healan Law Offices | William D. Healan, III
You are correct. Dismissed means that you were not convicted.
Answer Applies to: Georgia
Replied: 7/20/2012
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