Does changing the password on our joint account violate the order of protection? 22 Answers as of September 10, 2012

I have an order of protection against my husband. Two weeks after being arrested, he changed the password on our joint bank account.

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Law Office of Melvin Franke | Melvin Franke
An attorney would need to see the order.
Answer Applies to: Missouri
Replied: 9/10/2012
ADELMAN & SEIDE, LLP
ADELMAN & SEIDE, LLP | GEORGE N. SEIDE
I really don't know. He didn't contact you by changing the password. It might be considered harassment.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 9/7/2012
Reza Athari & Associates, PLLC | Seth L. Reszko
I don't know the exact language in the protective order. Obviously, it is a close call as to whether he violated it because at the very least it was designed to harass you.
Answer Applies to: Nevada
Replied: 9/7/2012
Steven Alpers | Steven Alpers
I would need to see the order to see what was and what was not ordered.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 9/7/2012
Law Offices of Frances Headley | Frances Headley
No, the action you describe does not violate the no contact order.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 9/7/2012
    Dennis P. Mikko Attorney at Law | Dennis P. Mikko
    Without reviewing the language contained in the order, it is difficult to answer. However, it does not seem that a personal protection order would prohibit him from changing the password on a joint account. Based on what has happened, you should consider opening an account in your own name so he cannot have access to your funds.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 9/7/2012
    Law Office of Angela M. Riccio | Angela M. Riccio
    A violation of a court order depends on the terms of a court order. In the event the order you refer to does not address the financial issues as you describe there may be other avenues for you to pursue. I suggest contacting an attorney to discuss your options.
    Answer Applies to: Illinois
    Replied: 9/7/2012
    John Russo | John Russo
    Read your statute, but I cannot see how that violates a protection order. It would not here in RI, but if you are in a divorce proceeding it may very well violate other orders.
    Answer Applies to: Rhode Island
    Replied: 9/7/2012
    Fox Law Firm LLC
    Fox Law Firm LLC | Tina Fox
    If you are still using the joint account jointly and have not pulled all of your monies out, it could be a form of harassment.
    Answer Applies to: Illinois
    Replied: 9/7/2012
    Musilli Brennan Associates PLLC
    Musilli Brennan Associates PLLC | John F Brennan
    The language of the protection order will control, sounds like you need an attorney and to file immediately, with additional orders, for divorce.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 9/7/2012
    Danville Law Group | Scott Jordan
    Yes, it would be a violation of the protective orders. If he does not voluntarily provide you with the password, you will need to go to court to get a court order allowing you access.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 9/7/2012
    Glenn E. Tanner
    Glenn E. Tanner | Glenn E. Tanner
    What does the order say? If it violates language in the order then yes. If not, then no.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 9/7/2012
    Wolfstone, Panchot & Bloch, P.S., Inc.
    Wolfstone, Panchot & Bloch, P.S., Inc. | Mark Brown
    An order of protection does not prevent him from changing passwords to banking accounts, or otherwise regulate financial matters. To do so, you muse file a petition for legal separation or dissolution, and in that court proceeding seek appropriate financial restraining orders.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 9/7/2012
    Law Office of James Bordonaro
    Law Office of James Bordonaro | James Albert Bordonaro
    It depends on the exact language of the statute in your state. It might be a violation but a minor one. However, if he's taking money out of the account then you should get a temporary order to prevent that. Most states have legal separations so you may not need to file a full divorce petition.
    Answer Applies to: Kansas
    Replied: 9/7/2012
    Robert J. Merlin, P.A.
    Robert J. Merlin, P.A. | Robert J. Merlin
    It does not technically violate a domestic violence injunction, but you can file a motion in your divorce asking the judge to give you access to the account.
    Answer Applies to: Florida
    Replied: 9/7/2012
    Diefer Law Group, P.C.
    Diefer Law Group, P.C. | Abel Fernandez
    The changing of a password does not violate an order that he not cancel or remove your name from a bank account. You could go to the bank to have access or request that he provide you the new password.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 9/7/2012
    Leonard A. Kaanta, P.C. | Leonard A. Kaanta
    Probably, yes.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 9/7/2012
    Victor Varga | Victor Varga
    If it states that in the order, then yes if not, then no.
    Answer Applies to: Maryland
    Replied: 9/7/2012
    Law Office of James Lentz
    Law Office of James Lentz | James Lentz
    It depends on what the restraining order restrains. Check with your lawyer today.
    Answer Applies to: Ohio
    Replied: 9/7/2012
    R. Jason de Groot, P.A
    R. Jason de Groot, P.A | R. Jason de Groot
    Only if the order prohibits him from doing so.
    Answer Applies to: Florida
    Replied: 9/7/2012
    Law Office of Lynda H. LeBlanc | Lynda Leblanc
    The order of protection will say exactly what your husband is prohibited from doing. If it is an order of protection for your safety and well being then it most likely just says that he has to stay away from you, and nothing about bank accounts. If it is a restraining order through a divorce, then again it should specifically lay out what you and he are prohibited from doing. Changing the online password probably isn't a violation by the letter of the order, but may be in spirit. You need to consult with a local attorney.
    Answer Applies to: Indiana
    Replied: 9/7/2012
    Havens Law, LLC
    Havens Law, LLC | William Havens Nebeker
    It depends on the language in the protective order. Mostly, protective orders are issued upon request to protect you and/or your children from harm, however protective orders do occasionally address the need to protect personal property. Money in an account is personal property.
    Answer Applies to: Utah
    Replied: 9/7/2012
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