Does an office has to read me the Miranda rights or asking the defendant to read is enough? 13 Answers as of May 20, 2013

I was arrested for Domestic Violence, the officer showed me a paper having Miranda rights and asked me to read before he started interrogation. I just oversaw those bullet points and signed it.

Ask a Local Attorney. 100% Anonymous. Free Answers.

Free Case Evaluation by a Local Lawyer: Click here
Michael Breczinski
Michael Breczinski | Michael Breczinski
You read and sighed it and have not told me that you did not understand it. I would say it is probably legal.
Answer Applies to: Michigan
Replied: 5/20/2013
Law Office of Geoffrey M. Yaryan
Law Office of Geoffrey M. Yaryan | Geoffrey M. Yaryan
He should asked you if you read and understood the rights, and if you gave up the rights and wish to talk without an attorney present. If you signed it with this type of admonishment, then it may be sufficient.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 5/20/2013
Law Office of Darin Kanfer | Darin J. Kanfer
They are supposed to read you Miranda rights when you are placed in custody. If they give them to you and have you read them, that likely would be sufficient. If you don't make any incriminating statements, then there is probably no issue with Miranda.
Answer Applies to: Michigan
Replied: 5/20/2013
Austin Legal Services, PLC
Austin Legal Services, PLC | Jared Austin
As long as you can read and understand English then that should be sufficient, especially if you signed it.
Answer Applies to: Michigan
Replied: 5/20/2013
Law Office of Jared C. Winter
Law Office of Jared C. Winter | Jared C. Winter
Sounds like you were probably advised of your rights. If you gave a statement, most courts would probably hold that you were advised of your rights and you waived them. But to be sure, you should consult with a local criminal defense attorney.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 5/20/2013
    Lawrence Lewis
    Lawrence Lewis | Lawrence Lewis, PC
    You signed it. Therefore you will be presumed to have read it, unless you can prove you cannot read.
    Answer Applies to: Georgia
    Replied: 5/17/2013
    Freeborn Law Offices, P.S.
    Freeborn Law Offices, P.S. | Steve Freeborn
    Assuming that you can read and understand what you are reading and you signed it, then that is sufficient.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 5/17/2013
    William L. Welch, III Attorney | William L. Welch, III
    A judge would have to decide whether you were in custody and whether you were properly advised of your rights before you answered the officers questions. An experienced criminal defense attorney can help you evaluate the prosecution's case, any defenses that you might have, and any plea offer that might be made, so that you can decide whether to go to trial.
    Answer Applies to: Maryland
    Replied: 5/17/2013
    Charles M. Schiff, Attorney at Law
    Charles M. Schiff, Attorney at Law | Charles M. Schiff
    If the officer wants to use your responses against you, and you are in custody at the time of his interrogation, he needs to show that you were advised of your rights. The document you signed is an acknowledgment that you were advised of your rights. It is not necessary that he actually read the rights to you.
    Answer Applies to: Minnesota
    Replied: 5/17/2013
    Jason Overton, Attorney at Law
    Jason Overton, Attorney at Law | Jason Overton
    He can read it to you or you can read them yourself. The idea is that you need to understand what rights you have. That is almost never an issue these days, because it is so well known to the general public. Just the fact that you're asking the question shows that you are aware of your "Miranda rights" and that there may be an issue with it. For future reference, your case is improved much more by just saying nothing, than it is by talking and trying to prove that you were unaware of your rights.
    Answer Applies to: Alabama
    Replied: 5/17/2013
    Law Office of Eric Sterkenburg
    Law Office of Eric Sterkenburg | Eric Sterkenburg
    Signing the statement that you read and understand your rights is a waiver of the rights.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 5/17/2013
Click to View More Answers:
12 3 Free Legal QuestionsConnect with a local attorney