Do impairment ratings still happen in workers compensation cases? 9 Answers as of April 01, 2014

I have reached my 700 weeks in benefits for workers compensations. What do I need to do to receive my impairment ratings now? Does it still happen in workers compensation cases? If not when did they stop? I did my independent medical examination that was requested by their adjuster. I am at 100 percent disabled through S.S.D.I.

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Doroshow, Pasquale, Krawitz & Bhaya | Donald E. Marston
If this is a Delaware case, the answer is: yes, we still have impairment ratings. I am not clear on what the 700 weeks means. Did you mean to say 300 weeks of partial disability?
Answer Applies to: Delaware
Replied: 4/1/2014
Kirby G. Moss PC | Kirby G. Moss
They still do PPI ratings and usually do them when you have been released from your Dr and/or have reached maximum medical improvement.
Answer Applies to: Indiana
Replied: 4/1/2014
James E. Hasser, Jr. P.C.
James E. Hasser, Jr. P.C. | Jim Hasser
Impairment ratings are given when you reach maximum medical improvement in your condition. Impairment ratings differ from disability ratings. An impairment is an anatomical loss of function expressed in a percentage loss. Impairment ratings to scheduled members of the body are paid in an entirely different manner than loss of earning capacity or total disability claims. It can be complicated. Consider consulting an experienced comp lawyer.
Answer Applies to: Alabama
Replied: 4/1/2014
Candiano Law Office
Candiano Law Office | Charles J. Candiano
You are in over your head. The SSA uses a completely different standard than the Commission. 700 weeks? You have received TTD/maintenance for 13 ? years? Unless you are in a coma or a double amputee, you need an experienced attorney to get you permanent total disability. Not having an attorney has cost you 1-3%. Assuming TTD of $1,000.00, NOT trying the case already cost you more than $60,000.00, just in the last 10 years because of the money you have forfeit from the Rate Adjustment Fund.
Answer Applies to: Illinois
Replied: 4/1/2014
Paul Whitfield and Associates P.A.
Paul Whitfield and Associates P.A. | Paul L. Whitfield
The doctor makes that call and likely already has since the carrier asked for an IME. Why don't you ask your lawyer to send you a copy of the doctors opinion. It is not a secret ask the lawyer, ask the doctor, ask anyone connected with the case.
Answer Applies to: North Carolina
Replied: 4/1/2014
    Pete Leehey Law Firm, P.C.
    Pete Leehey Law Firm, P.C. | Pete Leehey
    Yes, impairment ratings are still used in workers'compensation cases in Iowa. If you have already done the "independent" medical examination requested by the adjuster, there should be a rating in place. Ask the adjuster if he has a rating, and ask them to send you a copy. If you don't like the rating the "independent" doctor came up with, you are entitled to a second opinion impairment rating that must be paid for by the insurance company.
    Answer Applies to: Iowa
    Replied: 4/1/2014
    Andrew T. Velonis, P.C.
    Andrew T. Velonis, P.C. | Andrew Velonis
    Impairment ratings still happen, but at seven hundred weeks, you may have maxed out regardless. You may be better off foregoing the schedule award and just going with continuing medical benefits. Contact a comp attorney in your area to crunch some numbers for you.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 4/1/2014
    Barry Rabovsky & Associates
    Barry Rabovsky & Associates | Barry Rabovsky
    Would you be able to describe your injury and the treatment that you had? That would be helpful in attempting to answer your question.
    Answer Applies to: Illinois
    Replied: 4/1/2014
    Ty Wilson Law
    Ty Wilson Law | Ty Wilson
    Impairment ratings are typically issued when you have reached maximum medical improvement. They are still used.
    Answer Applies to: Georgia
    Replied: 4/1/2014
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