Do I wait or go to court house to file written response? 4 Answers as of January 13, 2016

I live in my apartment building 9 years. I recently lost my job and been having money issues. I'm 2 months late on my rent and received a summons from my landlord for court for rent not paid. The very next day in the mail, I received a letter saying delayed access to unlawful detainer case file. There was 60 days no access to file for defendants or plaintiffs. I'm not sure what to do on the original summons. It said that I have 5 days to file a written at the court and have a copy served on the plaintiff. I'm not sure what I should do. I just was hired today for a new job.

Ask a Local Attorney. 100% Anonymous. Free Answers.

Free Case Evaluation by a Local Lawyer: Click here
Law Offices of George H. Shers | George H. Shers
The notice merely is telling you that no one can go on line or to the court, except for the parties, to look at the file. You still must file an answer within 5 days. If you are now going to be able to pay your rent, contact your landlord and see what you can work out. You should have told him earlier that you had lost your job and would have trouble paying rent.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 1/13/2016
Heinly, Benson, Killian & Kramer, An Association of Attorneys Not a Partnership
Heinly, Benson, Killian & Kramer, An Association of Attorneys Not a Partnership | Valerie L Kramer
File your response immediately! That notice about access to unlawful detainer cases pertains to 3rd parties, NOT YOU! You must file your responsive pleading within the 5 calendar day period or a default will be entered against you.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 1/13/2016
Law Office of Jeffrey T. Reed | Jeffrey T. Reed
File a response as soon as possible. There may be legal help center at the court or you can go online to get the necessary documents.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 1/13/2016
Patrick W. Currin, Attorney at Law | Patrick Currin
The case has no public access for 60 days but you must file an Answer within 5 days of getting served.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 1/13/2016
Click to View More Answers: