Do I need to release my insurance medical limits? 40 Answers as of June 14, 2013

Do i need to release my insurance medical limits to the attorney representing the other driver involved in an accident?

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Law Office of Jared Altman
Law Office of Jared Altman | Jared Altman
No.
Answer Applies to: New York
Replied: 5/29/2013
Downriver Injury and Auto Law | Michael Heilmann
No, turn this matter over to your insurance carrier for handling.
Answer Applies to: Michigan
Replied: 6/28/2012
Law Offices of Kenneth Wincorn P.C.
Law Offices of Kenneth Wincorn P.C. | Kenneth Wincorn
It is best to let your insurance carrier decide that. They should have provided you with an adjuster or attorney who will make the decision. You should not be involved with answering questions.
Answer Applies to: Texas
Replied: 6/28/2012
Lapin Law Offices
Lapin Law Offices | Jeffrey Lapin
First, if you have car insurance you need to contact your insurance company as soon as possible if you have not already done so. Your car insurance company should then handle the claim with the attorney for the other driver and you should not have to do anything else unless you are instructed to by your insurance company. Your insurance company will likely tell you not to speak to the attorney. Second, unless you have been sued and are responding to a "discovery" request, you do not need to disclose any of your insurance limits to the attorney for the other driver. The limit the attorney wants is not likely your "medical" limit but your "Bodily Injury" (or sometimes called "Liability") limit.
Answer Applies to: Nebraska
Replied: 6/28/2012
David F. Stoddard
David F. Stoddard | David F. Stoddard
I really cannot understand our question. I do not know if you are the Plaintiff, and "Insurance Medical Limits" somehow refers to what your health Insurance has paid , or if it refers to some type of medical benefits that are part of your car insurance policy. On the other hand, I can't tell if you have been sued and you are referring to your car insurance policy limits for personal injury. If that is the case, your insurer will hire an attorney to defend the claim and the attorney can advise you as to what must be disclosed. If you are the Plaintiff and they are seeking the limits of medical benefits (such as PIP) in your auto insurance policy, if suit has been filed and they ask for that information in an interrogatory pursuant to the Rules of Civil Procedure, then you must disclose it. If the case is not yet in litigation, and this is not a formal discovery request, you do not have to disclose it.
Answer Applies to: South Carolina
Replied: 6/28/2012
    Gary L. Platt, Attorney at Law | Gary Platt
    If you are involved in a lawsuit and receive interrogatories from the other side's attorney asking you to divulge your insurance policy limits, I am not aware of any reason which would justify your refusing to provide that information, and you would be required to answer this question under oath. If you are not a party to litigation, you can refuse to answer the question, although it is not the sort of question which could, in my opinion, cause you any conceivable harm in answering, and if you are going to be a party to a lawsuit at some point, you will likely be legally required to answer the question eventually anyway, so there is nothing to be gained by refusing to answer.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 6/27/2012
    Mike Yeksavich | Mike Yeksavich
    You need to consult with your insurance company and your lawyer about this question.
    Answer Applies to: Oklahoma
    Replied: 6/27/2012
    James M. Osak, P.C.
    James M. Osak, P.C. | James M. Osak
    What does your lawyer have to say? If you don't have one, maybe its time to hire one. Yes, in discovery, the other side can ask you for your limits.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 6/27/2012
    Law Office of Gregory Crain | Gregory Crain
    Upon proper application, yes.
    Answer Applies to: Arkansas
    Replied: 6/27/2012
    DEAN T. JENNINGS, P.C.
    DEAN T. JENNINGS, P.C. | Dean T Jennings
    If requested as part of a lawsuit filed against you in answer to discovery requests done properly, the answer is yes. Talk to you insurance company and let them handle it. You should not release any information let your insurance company and your insurance defense lawyer handle it.
    Answer Applies to: Iowa
    Replied: 6/27/2012
    Conway Law Pllc.
    Conway Law Pllc. | B. L. Conway
    No let your insurance company handle it. It will tell you what it requires of you.
    Answer Applies to: Virginia
    Replied: 6/27/2012
    Michael J. Sgarlat Attorney at Law | Michael Joseph Sgarlat
    You should talk to a lawyer or contact your insurance carrier to explain the situation.
    Answer Applies to: Virginia
    Replied: 6/27/2012
    Law Offices of David W. Hibbert
    Law Offices of David W. Hibbert | David W. Hibbert
    In most states there is a requirement for insurance policy disclosures. It will not hurt you, however, you should report the incident to your insurance company and suggest that the other lawyer contact the company for such disclosure.
    Answer Applies to: Georgia
    Replied: 6/27/2012
    Dunnings Law Firm
    Dunnings Law Firm | Steven Dunnings
    Your insurance company should have hired an attorney to represent you, assuming you advosed your insurance company about the accident.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 6/27/2012
    Law Offices of Ronald A. Steinberg & Associates | Ronald A. Steinberg, BA, MA, JD
    Your lawyer well tell you whether or not you have to divulge information. There is a difference between that which is "discoverable," and that which is "admissible" at trial.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 6/27/2012
    Law Office of Ronald G. Draper | Ronald G. Draper
    Your insurance company should have an attorney advising you on this issue. And they probably will disclose the policy limits.
    Answer Applies to: Illinois
    Replied: 6/27/2012
    Law Office of Mark J. Leonardo
    Law Office of Mark J. Leonardo | Mark Leonardo
    I am not sure what you mean by release. If you are asking whether you need to disclose that information, you have no obligation to disclose any information regarding your insurance policy limits until you are in litigation. The question is why you would keep that information confidential. If you have a med-pay provision that covers the other persons medical expenses, I can think of no reason to refrain from disclosing that information. That's what the coverage is for. It does not cost you anything. Your insurance company might even disclose that to the other side, but they will not disclose your other policy limits without your permission.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 6/27/2012
    Evan Guthrie Law Firm
    Evan Guthrie Law Firm | Evan Guthrie
    No. Consult your attorney before speaking to anyone regarding your case.
    Answer Applies to: South Carolina
    Replied: 6/27/2012
    Kelaher Law Offices, P.A.
    Kelaher Law Offices, P.A. | James P Kelaher
    Typically, yes. If you do not have to indemnify, or pay back, your own insurance company for the medical payments coverage, then it is considered a collateral source and they are entitled to discover that.
    Answer Applies to: Florida
    Replied: 6/26/2012
    Blackburn Law, PC
    Blackburn Law, PC | Stephen E. Blackburn
    Assuming you are the at-fault party, you might as well; otherwise, the claimant's attorney will simply sue you and force you to disclose the policy limits in discovery, as such is discoverable in Idaho. So, either way they'll find out.
    Answer Applies to: Idaho
    Replied: 6/26/2012
    Law Offices of Mark L. Smith
    Law Offices of Mark L. Smith | Mark L. Smith
    I don't understand this question. Are you representing yoursel? Your insurance company should be taking care of these requests.
    Answer Applies to: Rhode Island
    Replied: 6/26/2012
    The Law Offices of Paul A. Samakow, P.C.
    The Law Offices of Paul A. Samakow, P.C. | Paul A. Samakow
    No, you do not need to release "medical" limits; you do need to release "liability" limits.
    Answer Applies to: Virginia
    Replied: 6/26/2012
    The Law Office of Harry E. Hudson, Jr.
    The Law Office of Harry E. Hudson, Jr. | Harry E. Hudson, Jr.
    If you are being sued and have insurance, the carrier should be providing you with an attorney. Discuss the issue with him or her. If you are the plaintiff with this type of question in discovery, you should have an attorney of whom you ask this question.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 6/26/2012
    Law Office of James J. Rosenberger | James Joseph Rosenberger
    No you do not. Once litigation is begun and formal request for that information is made then you will have to disclose but not prior thereto.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 6/26/2012
    Klisz Law Office, PLLC
    Klisz Law Office, PLLC | Timothy J. Klisz
    Michigan doesn't have insurance medical limits. Do you mean 3rd party bodily injury limits.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 6/26/2012
    Musilli Brennan Associates PLLC
    Musilli Brennan Associates PLLC | John F Brennan
    If you are claiming reimbursement of their medical expenses then they are relevant to your case and are capable of being subpoenaed. If, on the other hand, you are not making a claim they may not be relevant and potentially could be protected. You have not given me enough information in order to form a firm opinion. Obviously there is another attorney involved, you should engage one immediately and not speak to anyone without counsel. All of the people on the other side are not your friend.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 6/26/2012
    Paul Whitfield and Associates P.A.
    Paul Whitfield and Associates P.A. | Paul L. Whitfield
    You may be getting 2 ideas mixed. The attorney is not concerned with "medical" limits. He would like to know your liability limits perhaps. You don't have to do anything unless a suit has been filed and the court requires you to do it. if you have a lawyer let him deal with it. if you dont have a lawyer, get one. If you don't want to get one let your own insurance company deal with it.
    Answer Applies to: North Carolina
    Replied: 6/26/2012
    Ezim Law Firm | Dean Esposito
    No, unless suit has been filed and the opposing attorney has subpoenaed the information or requested such through discovery.
    Answer Applies to: Louisiana
    Replied: 6/26/2012
    Adler Law Group, LLC
    Adler Law Group, LLC | Lawrence Adler
    Prior to the discovery process in a law suit you don't have to. He will likely need the information to make a settlement since it will be part of the collateral source calculation made as part of that process.
    Answer Applies to: Connecticut
    Replied: 6/26/2012
    Pearson, Butler, & Carson, PLLC
    Pearson, Butler, & Carson, PLLC | Matthew R. Kober
    Yes. If you have insurance, you should notify you insurance company of the claim and they should handle everything for you. Or you can hire an attorney and he/she will handle things for you as well.
    Answer Applies to: Utah
    Replied: 6/26/2012
    R. D. Kelly Law Firm, P.L.L.C.
    R. D. Kelly Law Firm, P.L.L.C. | Robert Kelly
    Your question is unclear at to what you are asking. If you were at fault in a motor vehicle collision, your insurance company should pay.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 6/26/2012
    Koning & Jilek, P.C.
    Koning & Jilek, P.C. | Jonathan Neal Jilek
    If called for in formal discovery, then likely yes.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 6/26/2012
    Shaw Legal Services
    Shaw Legal Services | Anne Shaw
    Yes, you will have to give your insurance information and policy limits to the other attorney.
    Answer Applies to: Illinois
    Replied: 6/26/2012
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