Do I have to pay back child support if I just found out I am the father? 25 Answers as of June 09, 2011

After three years I was told that I am a Father of Twins. Do I have to Pay Back Child support on children that are three years old I just found out that I May be the Father?

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Michael Anthony Wing, P.C.
Michael Anthony Wing, P.C. | Michael Anthony Wing
The maximum amount of time that would be subject to "reach back" is two years. In this county, if you don't object to paternity, the Investigation and Recovery court will not charge you for the DNA test that will be required whether or not you object. Stay well.
Answer Applies to: Alabama
Replied: 6/9/2011
Law Office of James Lentz
Law Office of James Lentz | James Lentz
In Ohio you would pay from the date of the court case alleging paternity. Please see a local domestic relations attorney for further information.
Answer Applies to: Ohio
Replied: 6/9/2011
Warner Center Law Offices of Donald F. Conviser
Warner Center Law Offices of Donald F. Conviser | Donald F. Conviser
You won't have to pay back support, unless the mother was on welfare, in which case, you may be required to repay welfare for the amounts paid to the mother to support the children. By all means, seek a DNA test to determine whether or not you are the twin's father.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 6/8/2011
Howard W. Collins, Attorney at Law
Howard W. Collins, Attorney at Law | Howard W. Collins
In Oregon: The State of Oregon can ask for child support back to the date of birth. The arrearage is not mandatory so under certain circumstances back child support is not required.
Answer Applies to: Oregon
Replied: 6/8/2011
Gregory T. Buckley, Attorney at Law
Gregory T. Buckley, Attorney at Law | Gregory T. Buckley
In an initial determination of paternity, there is generally a two-year limit on back child support.
Answer Applies to: Florida
Replied: 6/8/2011
    Law Office of Patricia Van Haren
    Law Office of Patricia Van Haren | Patricia Van Haren
    You will not be obligated to pay child support prior to the time that you were notified that there was a support action filed against you. If a child support action was not filed until recently you would only be obligated to pay child support as of the date that the action was filed.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 6/8/2011
    Arnold & Wadsworth
    Arnold & Wadsworth | Brian Arnold
    Depends on the state. You do have a good argument that you could not be held liable for back child support because you were not in purposeful non-compliance.
    Answer Applies to: Utah
    Replied: 6/8/2011
    Willick Law Group
    Willick Law Group | Marshal S. Willick
    Maybe. It's discretionary, but up to four years back support can be ordered under NRS 125B.030. Of course, whether you are actually the father is important. See my website for more information.
    Answer Applies to: Nevada
    Replied: 6/8/2011
    Law Office of Curry & Westgate
    Law Office of Curry & Westgate | Patrick Curry
    It depends on whether she was on welfare or not. If not, then you only have to pay from the date of the filing of the child support motion, if yes then DCSS can go back to the first date of welfare.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 6/8/2011
    Law Office of L. Paul Zahn
    Law Office of L. Paul Zahn | Paul Zahn
    Only if there is already an order in place. If you are in my area and are looking for an attorney, please contact me for a free consultation.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 6/8/2011
    Joanna Mitchell & Associates, P.A.
    Joanna Mitchell & Associates, P.A. | Joanna Mitchell
    I would suggest requesting a DNA test in order to confirm that you are the biological father and doing this as soon as possible. If the test confirms that you are the biological father, then yes, you can be required to pay up to two years of back child support. A small amount, usually about between 10% to 20% of the ongoing monthly payment, would be added to the ongoing monthly payment until the retroactive child support was paid in full.
    Answer Applies to: Florida
    Replied: 6/8/2011
    Goldberg Jones
    Goldberg Jones | Zephyr Hill
    No. If there was no Order for support, there are no arrears or back child support to be paid. However, you will be ordered to pay support going forward until the children are 18 and done with high school.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 6/8/2011
    John E. Kirchner, Attorney at Law
    John E. Kirchner, Attorney at Law | John Kirchner
    If you were never married to the mother, you can be required to pay child support retroactively to birth of the children. Whether a judge will require that (after there is a definitive judgment that you are the father) depends on all the relevant facts. For example, if it is clear that the mother intentionally concealed the fact of the birth from you, the judge might be willing to cut you some slack. You ought to consult a lawyer about the options and possibilities available in a paternity case - including your rights be involved in actually parenting the children if you wish to do so.
    Answer Applies to: Colorado
    Replied: 6/8/2011
    Beaulier Law Office
    Beaulier Law Office | Maury Beaulier
    In Minnesota, in an initial child support hearing, support may be calculated retroactively for the previous two year period. A court determines what is appropriate based on equitable considerations.
    Answer Applies to: Minnesota
    Replied: 6/8/2011
    Ashman Law Office
    Ashman Law Office | Glen Edward Ashman
    Support starts now, however in setting it a judge may take into account what was not paid in the past.
    Answer Applies to: Georgia
    Replied: 6/8/2011
    Wolverine Law | Stuart Collis
    In Michigan, you may be required to pay back support for up to six years. However, many judges will only order support from the date that a complaint was filed against you. Also, you may have to pay the confinement costs (hospitalization costs) of the children being born.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 6/8/2011
    Law Office Of Jody A. Miller
    Law Office Of Jody A. Miller | Jody A. Miller
    In Georgia, while you cannot be ordered to pay "back child support", depending on the circumstances of the case you can be ordered to pay a share of the actual, proven expenses for the birth and expenses up to the current time. Any child support award would be going forward, not in arrears.
    Answer Applies to: Georgia
    Replied: 6/8/2011
    Fox Law Firm LLC
    Fox Law Firm LLC | Tina Fox
    No, not if you truly had not knowledge of the children. We handle child support cased here at the Fox Law Firm, and would be happy to assist you in this matter to help protect you and your rights. Call us today.
    Answer Applies to: Illinois
    Replied: 6/8/2011
    Law Office of Robert L. Fiedler
    Law Office of Robert L. Fiedler | Robert L Fiedler
    There is a look back period that could be as long as three years.
    Answer Applies to: Connecticut
    Replied: 6/8/2011
    Cody and Gonillo, LLP
    Cody and Gonillo, LLP | Christine Gonilla
    Probably but you could pay it in installments on top of current support.
    Answer Applies to: Connecticut
    Replied: 6/8/2011
    Seattle Divorce Services
    Seattle Divorce Services | Michael V. Fancher
    Under Washington law back support can be ordered in Paternity cases.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 6/8/2011
    Beresford Booth PLLC
    Beresford Booth PLLC | S. Scott Burkhalter
    In Washington State, the answer is yes if you are established as the father.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 6/8/2011
    Reeves Law Firm, P.C.
    Reeves Law Firm, P.C. | Roy L. Reeves
    There are rules on this issue. Generally, yes, you have to pay back support. There is a presumption you knew or should have known. You can fight on the grounds that she hid this fact from you, it is difficult but possible.
    Answer Applies to: Texas
    Replied: 6/8/2011
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