Do I have to pay alimony? 23 Answers as of July 11, 2013

My wife and I are going through a divorce. We have been married 8 years she has worked in this marriage but is too lazy to get a job. She has cheated on me multiple times. We have no children together. Do I have to pay her alimony?

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Law Office of Robert L. Fiedler
Law Office of Robert L. Fiedler | Robert L Fiedler
Many factors go into a determination like yours. More inforamtion would be needed to answer your question.
Answer Applies to: Connecticut
Replied: 7/11/2013
Glenn E. Tanner
Glenn E. Tanner | Glenn E. Tanner
Maybe. Her cheating is irrelevant. Depends on your relative financial facts.
Answer Applies to: Washington
Replied: 6/17/2011
Reeves Law Firm, P.C.
Reeves Law Firm, P.C. | Roy L. Reeves
Good news for you, alimony is unconstitutional in Texas. You may want to review prior answers I have posted for more information, but there is very limited spousal support you may pay, but it is very limited. Call me if you want any particulars and if this is going to proceed in Dallas or Collin County, please give my firm a chance to earn your business.
Answer Applies to: Texas
Replied: 6/17/2011
Meriwether & Tharp LLC
Meriwether & Tharp LLC | Patrick Meriwether
In Georgia, a spouse's adultery that causes the divorce will bar alimony.
Answer Applies to: Georgia
Replied: 6/17/2011
Beaulier Law Office
Beaulier Law Office | Maury Beaulier
The answer to your question is not simple and requires a review of the facts. The answer to your question is not a simple one. Unlike Minnesota's child support statutes, there are no percentage guidelines to determine when spousal maintenance is appropriate or at what level. In Minnesota, trial courts have broad discretion in deciding whether to award maintenance and in determining its duration and amount. As a result, spousal maintenance often becomes one of the most contested issues in divorce proceedings.Currently, spousal maintenance awards are granted pursuant to Minnesota Statutes 518.552 if the spouse seeking maintenance demonstrates that he or she:(1) lacks sufficient property, including marital property apportioned as part of the divorce to provide for the reasonable needs of the spouse considering the standard of living established during the marriage, especially, but not limited to, a period of training or education; or(2) is unable to provide adequate self-support, after considering the standard of living established during the marriage and all relevant circumstance, through appropriate employment, or(3) is the custodian of a child whose condition and circumstances make it appropriate that the custodian not be required to seek employment outside the home.In determining the amount and duration of spousal maintenance, Minnesota statutes require that Courts address all relevant factors.
Answer Applies to: Minnesota
Replied: 6/17/2011
    Theodore W. Robinson, P.C.
    Theodore W. Robinson, P.C. | Theodore W. Robinson
    You will likely be directed to pay temporary support to give her time to get on her feet financially, but it should not be permanent maintenance under any conditions as long as she has the ability to work and make a living. Speak to a local matrimonial attorney. Good luck.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 6/17/2011
    Michael Apicella
    Michael Apicella | Apicella Law and Mediation
    California is a "no-fault" state. Meaning, whether a spouse cheated or not is irrelevant to the issue of spousal support (and any other financial issue). As to whether you will have to pay "alimony," which is called spousal support in California, look up on Google California Family Code section 4320. That code section contained the factors a judge will consider to determine whether, how much, and for how long any spousal support should be paid. You can also read the following legal guide I drafted to get more info.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 6/17/2011
    John E. Kirchner, Attorney at Law
    John E. Kirchner, Attorney at Law | John Kirchner
    You may or may not be required to pay alimony for some period of time; you need to consult an attorney familiar with Georgia law to evaluate the actual facts of your case in the context of what Georgia law requires. As a rule, alimony involves a balancing test of need versus ability to pay and alimony is only payable for the time it appears necessary for the receiving spouse to become self-sufficient. In some states infidelity will bar alimony; in other states, infidelity is not relevant to anything.
    Answer Applies to: Colorado
    Replied: 6/17/2011
    Law Office of Michael W. Bugni
    Law Office of Michael W. Bugni | Jay W. Neff
    Maybe. There is a statutory list of factors that the court is supposed to consider. These include: need, ability to pay, duration of the marriage, health of the parties, work experience of the parties, education of the parties, and a number of others. Without having complete information and doing an analysis of all of the factors, "maybe" is about the best that anyone could say.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 6/17/2011
    Michael Rose Attorney at Law
    Michael Rose Attorney at Law | Michael Rose
    Cheating is not considered for spousal support. She can ask for it and the facts will determine if she is entitled to support. She may not need it if she works.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 6/17/2011
    Seattle Divorce Services
    Seattle Divorce Services | Michael V. Fancher
    Under Washington law it is up to the court to decide whether you are required to pay spousal support. Often the court will look at the income potential of both parties rather than just actual income. Infidelity and children don't really have much to do with it. Consult with an attorney in your area as to your specific situation.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 6/17/2011
    Pontrello Law
    Pontrello Law | William Pontrello
    In Florida 7 years starts consideration of some sort of alimony, not permanent, but either bridge the gap or durational or rehabilitative. seek consultation of at least 1 hour with a qualified divorce attorney.
    Answer Applies to: Florida
    Replied: 6/17/2011
    Goolsby Law Office
    Goolsby Law Office | Richard Goolsby
    I would recommend that you hire a divorce lawyer ASAP. While adultery, if proven, may be a bar to alimony, you should discuss all the facts and your rights and options with your lawyer. Good luck!
    Answer Applies to: Georgia
    Replied: 6/17/2011
    Cody and Gonillo, LLP
    Cody and Gonillo, LLP | Christine Gonilla
    There are many factors that go into alimony. Even if you do have to pay it will most likely be of a limited duration.
    Answer Applies to: Connecticut
    Replied: 6/17/2011
    Warner Center Law Offices of Donald F. Conviser
    Warner Center Law Offices of Donald F. Conviser | Donald F. Conviser
    You might. You would be well advised to at least consult with, if not retain an experienced Family Law Attorney. It is possible that income could be imputed to your wife, diminishing or eliminating your responsibility to pay attorney's fees to her.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 6/16/2011
    Law Office of James Lentz
    Law Office of James Lentz | James Lentz
    Maybe. In Ohio and Michigan Spousal support is not manditory. A person qualifies for spousal support based upon local formulas. Ask your local divorce attorney about spousal support in your jurisdiction.
    Answer Applies to: Ohio
    Replied: 6/16/2011
    Willick Law Group
    Willick Law Group | Marshal S. Willick
    Alimony is "the last great crapshoot of family law." It is highly variable as to what State's law applies, the particulars of your factual history, and even the predispositions of the individual judge.
    Answer Applies to: Nevada
    Replied: 6/16/2011
    Gregory T. Buckley, Attorney at Law
    Gregory T. Buckley, Attorney at Law | Gregory T. Buckley
    Your marriage would not be considered a long term marriage, so there would not be a presumption that you have to pay alimony.
    Answer Applies to: Florida
    Replied: 6/16/2011
    Edwin Fahlen Attorney at Law
    Edwin Fahlen Attorney at Law | Edwin Fahlen
    In your case a process by which the court can impute income to your wife is necessary. Then if she does not want to work, that is her problem. However the court will "act like"..."impute" income to her for the purpose of establishing spousal support (what you have termed alimony). We are very successful with this procedure through this office.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 6/16/2011
    Law Office of L. Paul Zahn
    Law Office of L. Paul Zahn | Paul Zahn
    It is likely you will have to pay some spousal support, but at some point, she will have to get a job. If you are in my area and are looking for an attorney, please contact me for a free consultation.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 6/16/2011
    Law Office Of Jody A. Miller
    Law Office Of Jody A. Miller | Jody A. Miller
    In Georgia alimony is based on the need of the person asking and the ability of the other person to pay. Some of the factors the judge will look at are length of marriage, relative incomes, relative work experience, relative education, relative financial position, the health of each party, the age of the parties, whether someone needs time and/or continued education to go back into the work force. The judge can also take the behavior of the behavior of the parties during the marriage into account. You need to talk with an attorney about your specific situation to help determine if alimony is an issue.
    Answer Applies to: Georgia
    Replied: 6/16/2011
    The Reed Law Firm, P.L.L.C.
    The Reed Law Firm, P.L.L.C. | Vanessa Reed
    There are many factors which are taken into consideration in determining whether spousal support will be ordered. This, unfortunately, is not an easy question to answer. Spousal support (often called Alimony) is based on the income and needs of each party as well as a host of other factors, such as the length of the marriage, and standard of living established during the marriage. There is no set formula for calculating spousal support, although some counties established spousal support guidelines. An attorney can help you determine how much you should request or expect to pay in spousal support. Please click on the above hyper-link to read content from my website concerning this issue.
    Answer Applies to: Virginia
    Replied: 6/16/2011
    Ashman Law Office
    Ashman Law Office | Glen Edward Ashman
    Maybe. Maybe not. We have not seen each of your financial affidavits, nor do we know what evidence of infidelity you can prove in court. Those details affect the answer. What concerns me is the fact you posted here. That tells me that you are going through a divorce without a lawyer, which is a guaranteed way of having a very bad result. Get counsel immediately.
    Answer Applies to: Georgia
    Replied: 6/16/2011
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