Do I have to give the insurance company my medical records? How? 22 Answers as of August 28, 2015

Do I have to show my medical records in order to have them pay for my bills? They already paid to fix the car because it wasn’t my fault. I have been trying to get the insurance to pay my medical bills for months, and now they are asking for unlimited access to my medical records. There are some records that are completely unrelated to the crash that I would rather they did not see, but I really need reimbursement for my medical bills, and I do not want to lose the chance to get a settlement. Do I need to grant them access to all of my records?

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Pius Joseph A Professional Law Corp. | Pius Joseph
You seem to be handling this matter on your own. If your case is small and expectation is small from the case you can cooperate with the insurance company although they will take advantage of you . If you want to be smart about it, hire a lawyer to deal with this since insurance company will not give you the fair value of your under any circumstance of you deal with them directly. Second, a lawyer will not give them unfettered rights to the medical records. So best advice is to stop contact with them and get a competent lawyer to handle your matter. Good Luck.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 5/28/2015
Law Ofices of Edwin K. Niles | Edwin K. Niles
Often the insurance companies will evaluate a case based solely on the medical bills and reports from the treating doctors. Once in a while, however, they will want to review all old records to make sure that the current problems are not something that you had before the incident.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 5/26/2015
Richard B. Jacobson & Associates, LLC | Richard B. Jacobson
Yes. If you want them to pay the bills, they have to use their own judgment, and not yours, on what is relevant and what is not. I don't think you need to worry about their seeing anything personal or embarrassing: they've seen it all before, and they cannot disclose it further to harm you. Good Luck. whom you personally retain.
Answer Applies to: Wisconsin
Replied: 5/26/2015
James E. Hasser, Jr. P.C.
James E. Hasser, Jr. P.C. | Jim Hasser
You do not have to give them access to your medical records, but if you are claiming you were injured, you open up your medical condition to scrutiny and if suit is filed they would be allowed access to all your records unless you get a protective order from the court. As a practical matter, though, if you don't allow them access, it is not likely that they will fully compensate you for your injuries in a settlement. You may want to restrict their access, if they will allow you to. You may also want to talk to an experienced injury lawyer. Good luck.
Answer Applies to: Alabama
Replied: 5/26/2015
Stephens Gourley & Bywater | David A. Stephens
If is it your car insurance company, they can see the records related to the accident, and it is not likely they will pay the bills without reviewing the records. They do not need to see all of your medical records and it may be bad faith if they insist on seeing all records.
Answer Applies to: Nevada
Replied: 5/26/2015
    Utah Injury Lawyer
    Utah Injury Lawyer | Will Rodgers
    First, get an injury lawyer to help you because he will handle this for you and make sure the insurance company does not try to get more records than are reasonable and relevant. Second, yes, the car insurance companies almost always require you to sign a medical release in order for them to get all of your medical bills and records to pay at least up to the $3,000.00 PIP (Personal Injury Protection) Utah State Minimum required coverage. Third, again, get an injury lawyer to represent you to help you protect your rights and get you a far better result than you could get.
    Answer Applies to: Utah
    Replied: 5/26/2015
    Ty Wilson Law | Ty Wilson
    You should NEVER give the insurance company unlimited access to your medical records, it is not relevant to the wreck. You should get your medical records from the crash. However, prior to handing them over to the insurance company you will want to speak with a Georgia personal injury attorney. Good luck.
    Answer Applies to: Georgia
    Replied: 5/26/2015
    Law Offices of Ronald A. Steinberg & Associates | Ronald A. Steinberg, BA, MA, JD
    How can you prove that the medical bills are due to accident-related injuries? Only the records will prove it. So the answer is YES. By giving access to all bills, you are also proving that they are not paying for either a pre-existing condition or for unrelated problems.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 5/26/2015
    Ferguson & Ferguson
    Ferguson & Ferguson | Randy W. Ferguson
    Only if their is a pre-existing issue they question. You do not have to release all records. Exclude what is unrelated like psychological stuff.
    Answer Applies to: Alabama
    Replied: 5/26/2015
    Andrew T. Velonis, P.C.
    Andrew T. Velonis, P.C. | Andrew Velonis
    Yes, you do need to let them see. If you want the bills paid, they have to see what they are paying for. As for unrelated conditions, they want to make sure they are not paying for that, and the only way to sort through it is to see what the records say.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 5/26/2015
    John Russo | John Russo
    For the most part yes, its called discovery they are looking for preexisting injuries, and they are entitled to that info.
    Answer Applies to: Rhode Island
    Replied: 5/26/2015
    Law Office of Lisa Hurtado McDonnell | Lisa Hurtado McDonnell
    You have to share your medical records to show it wasn't a preexisting condition or that the accident was exasperated ( made condition worse).
    Answer Applies to: Utah
    Replied: 5/26/2015
    Law Offices of George H. Shers | George H. Shers
    They are definitely not entitled in California to see any psychiatric or drug abuse records unless you are alleging a mental injury, and they are only entitled to see medical records that might be relevant [injuries effecting the same parts of your body or functions]. The Release you sign should have that restriction and the requirement that you get a copy of all the records and that the Release is good only for same the last ten years and expires within 6 months. The problem is, that the medical provider will not go through the records and only give them relevant, non-protected information, they will just turn over your entire file for copying. They are not legally obligated to settle with you and will not unless they see the records, unless you are asking for less than the case is worth. If you file suit, they will be able and will subpoena all your medical records. So you do not have much of a choice if you want to settle. But first see a couple of personal injury attorney, the initial visit is free, and find out roughly how much your case is worth.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 5/25/2015
    End, Hierseman & Crain, LLC | J. Michael End
    Your lawyer can give the insurance company authorizations for just those doctors or hospitals who treated you for the injuries you suffered in the accident. You don't have to give the insurance company a blanket authorization. If you don't have a lawyer yet, you should get one. It will make everything much easier and will probably result in your getting more money.
    Answer Applies to: Wisconsin
    Replied: 5/25/2015
    Law Offices of Robert Burns
    Law Offices of Robert Burns | Robert Burns
    You are vague and incomplete on your information. If you are addressing liability insurance there is no right to insurance proceeds except for damages which you establish; in that event you'll need a confidentiality agreement but won't be able to play judge and decide what's relevant.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 5/25/2015
    Gregory S. Shurman, LLC
    Gregory S. Shurman, LLC | Gregory S Shurman
    You should consult with an attorney. Your question is best answered by way of conversation.
    Answer Applies to: Georgia
    Replied: 5/25/2015
    Law Offices of Tanya Gendelman, P.C.
    Law Offices of Tanya Gendelman, P.C. | Tanya Gendelman, Esq.
    You should hire a lawyer who will know which medical records to provide, you will get more money with an experienced personal injury lawyer.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 5/25/2015
    Matthew D Kaplan LLC
    Matthew D Kaplan LLC | Matthew D Kaplan
    It depends on the facts involved. I recommend you not have any contact w the at fault party insurance company.
    Answer Applies to: Oregon
    Replied: 5/25/2015
    Law Offices of Richard M. Levy P.C.
    Law Offices of Richard M. Levy P.C. | Richard M. Levy
    That would be a yes.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 8/28/2015
    Geneva Yourse | Geneva Yourse
    You can send them the relevant bills and records only.
    Answer Applies to: North Carolina
    Replied: 5/25/2015
    Lloyd H. Thomas III P.C. | Lloyd H. Thomas III
    No you do not. Just give them the records and bills relating to the injuries you sustained as a result of the wreck. Better yet, contact a personal injury attorney that will do it for you and negotiate a fair settlement for you or take you case to court.
    Answer Applies to: Georgia
    Replied: 5/25/2015
    The Law Office of Stephen R. Chesley, LLC
    The Law Office of Stephen R. Chesley, LLC | Stephen R. Chesley
    Once you bring a personal injury action your whole medical history comes into question. The insurance company wishes to know if the injuries that you are claiming are directly related to the accident and not pre existing. If you want bills to pay, they need to know if the bills are related to the injury from the accident and not other factors. You are making a claim and you must prove that claim.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 5/25/2015
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