Do I have the right to see a Will where my name was mentioned? 28 Answers as of March 04, 2013

My grandmother recently passed away and my name is mentioned in her Will. My Aunt is the executor and apparently has the power of attorney. She read the will to my Father and no one else. What I would like to know, since my name is mentioned (even though nothing specific was left to me) do I have the right to see the Will?

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O'Keefe Legal Services, L.L.C.
O'Keefe Legal Services, L.L.C. | Sean P. O'Keefe
In Maryland, yes because once admitted to probate the will becomes available to the public. You may view the will at or purchase a copy from the Register of Wills office in the county where the will was admitted for probate.
Answer Applies to: Maryland
Replied: 3/4/2013
DOUGLAS A. TULL, P.C.
DOUGLAS A. TULL, P.C. | Douglas A. Tull
IF, you live in Michigan, the law requires the person who possesses the Last Will and Testament of a person who dies, to file it with the Probate Court for the county where that decedent had resided, as soon as possible after the death. IF your aunt follows the law and files it with the probate court, you will be able to see it at the court. IF there are assets in your grandmother's estate which require probate, then the fact that your name is mentioned in the will, will matter. But if all of grandmother's assets were held jointly with aunt, or otherwise payable to a beneficiary on death (like life insurance, annuities, qualified plans) then there may not be any assets that pass through probate for you to receive anything. That happens sometimes.
Answer Applies to: Michigan
Replied: 2/24/2013
Hamblin Law Office | Sally Hamblin
Generally, if you are an interested party, a person that will inherit, yes you do. There are many reasons why your name was mentioned. For instance, if your father does not survive his mother, then you may inherit. You could ask your father, but are you legally entitled to a copy. Not necessarily based on what you stated.
Answer Applies to: Michigan
Replied: 2/24/2013
Minor, Bandonis and Haggerty, P.C.
Minor, Bandonis and Haggerty, P.C. | Brian Haggerty
The will isn't going to do anything at all until it is submitted to the probate court. At that time, everybody in the world will be able to see it. If you are named as a devise in the will, then you will get a notice from the personal representative about the opening of probate. If that notice doesn't include a copy of the will, you can ask for one.
Answer Applies to: Oregon
Replied: 2/21/2013
Goldsmith & Guymon
Goldsmith & Guymon | Dara Goldsmith
The will is public record. It needs to be lodged with the court. You can order a copy. If the estate is probated in Nevada you are entitled to notice even if you are not a beneficiary.
Answer Applies to: Nevada
Replied: 2/21/2013
    Durham Jones & Pinegar | Erven Nelson
    Yes, I suggest that you and your father request a copy of the will in writing. It should be filed with the Clerk within 30 days of your grandmother's death. If not, you could petition the court if a probate has been opened.
    Answer Applies to: Nevada
    Replied: 2/21/2013
    Law Office of Pamela Braynon | Pamela Y. Braynon
    Once the will is accepted in probate court, every person named in the will should receive a copy of the will along with the pleading to open the estate in court.
    Answer Applies to: Florida
    Replied: 2/21/2013
    Irsfeld, Irsfeld & Younger LLP | Norman H. Green
    Yes. The will is not a private document. Legally, it must be deposited with the court clerk even if there is no probate. And anybody can get a copy from the court.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 2/21/2013
    Law Office Of Victor Waid
    Law Office Of Victor Waid | Victor Waid
    The will is supposed to be filed in court within 30 days of death, and if not then the person who withholds the will can be criminally responsible; so check with the court to see if the will was filed; if so, ask to see a copy; if not, then report your aunt to the district attorney for a criminal action.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 2/21/2013
    Law Office of Edward M. Burgh, APC | Edward M. Burgh
    It depends. Has she passed on or not? If she has and her Will was given to the Probate Court, you should be able to see it if you go to the Court. If she hasn't died, then you can only see it if she agrees to show it to you. She might think you are money-grubbing and not show it to you. She has the right to redo the Will and leave you out of it. If you want to know for sure hire an Attorney and ask him/her.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 2/21/2013
    Frederick & Frederick PLC | James P Frederick
    Is there an estate open? If so, then your being named would make you an "interested person." That would entitle you to a copy of the Will. If there is no estate open, then there is no recourse, at this time.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 2/21/2013
    Thompson Ostler & Olsen dba Franchise Business Law Group | Brooke Ashton
    Generally a will is required to be probated by the court. At that time the will becomes part of the public record. When it is part of the public record, you should be able to attain a copy from the court.
    Answer Applies to: Utah
    Replied: 2/20/2013
    Randy M. Lish, Attorney at Law | Randy M. Lish
    Yes you do, in most states.
    Answer Applies to: Utah
    Replied: 2/20/2013
    Martin Barnes - Attorney at Law
    Martin Barnes - Attorney at Law | Martin Barnes
    Yes. If you have a beneficial interest and are named in the will you have rights. It sounds as if you may need to engage an Indiana attorney to assist you with your claim on the estate.
    Answer Applies to: Indiana
    Replied: 2/20/2013
    Kokish & Goldmanis, P.C.
    Kokish & Goldmanis, P.C. | Bernard H. Greenberg
    In Colorado, any purported Will of the person who has died (the decedent) is required to be filed with the Court of the County where the decedent was residing at the time of death. The filed Will is a matter of public record and can be viewed at the Court unless sealed by a Court Order. You may wish to consider asking the PR for a copy of the Will; visiting the Court yourself and filing a Demand for Notice with the Court. You should also consider consulting with an attorney who specializes in estates to learn more about your rights and the estate administration process.
    Answer Applies to: Colorado
    Replied: 2/20/2013
    Scott Polsky
    Scott Polsky | Scott Polsky
    All wills are required by law to be filed with the Register of Wills of the county where the decedent last resided. They then become public record. Anyone in the world can get a copy.
    Answer Applies to: Pennsylvania
    Replied: 2/20/2013
    Kram & Wooster, P.S. | Richard H. Wooster
    As a potential beneficiary you have the right to see the will. If the estate is subject to probate, the will becomes part of the court file where it is subject to review.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 2/20/2013
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