Do I have a legal recourse against my neighbor for my injuries? 27 Answers as of November 18, 2013

Yesterday, I went outside to check my mail and the neighbor’s dog broke its chain and attacked me I had to go to the emergency room and had four deep lacerations in my arm. The neighbor said he already put the dog down but I was wondering if I could sue him for the time I have to miss of work since I can barely use my arm.

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Durham Jones & Pinegar | Erven Nelson
Yes, you have a good case for personal injury.
Answer Applies to: Nevada
Replied: 11/18/2013
Law Offices of Ronald A. Steinberg & Associates | Ronald A. Steinberg, BA, MA, JD
Absolutely. If you are injured in an unprovoked attack by a domesticated animal, the owner is responsible for the reasonable charges for all necessary services, plus all other foreseeable damages.
Answer Applies to: Michigan
Replied: 10/14/2013
Vasilaros Legal,LLC
Vasilaros Legal,LLC | Steven T. Vasilaros
Yes you can. In florida, dog owners are charged with the duty of keeping their dogs under control. When they fail in that duty, the owner is liable for all damages the dog causes.
Answer Applies to: Florida
Replied: 10/7/2013
DeVore, Acton & Stafford
DeVore, Acton & Stafford | Fred W. DeVore, III
If your neighbor's dog causes you injury, as a general rule, you have the right to recover your medical bills, lost earnings, pain and suffering and other losses. In some cases, it is required that the owner of the dog know its propensity for aggressiveness. fred
Answer Applies to: North Carolina
Replied: 10/7/2013
David F. Stoddard
David F. Stoddard | David F. Stoddard
If you are in S.C. (and most states) the neighbor would be liable for your damages.
Answer Applies to: South Carolina
Replied: 10/7/2013
    S. Joseph Schramm | Joseph Schramm
    It appears that you would have a cause of action against the owner of the dog for your injuries, including medical bills, lost wages, scarring and disfigurement, any medical complications such as infection from the wounds, pain & suffering and loss of enjoyment of life pleasures. You should retain counsel to discuss your incident further.
    Answer Applies to: Pennsylvania
    Replied: 10/7/2013
    Law Offices of George H. Shers | George H. Shers
    You have a clear negligence suit since the chain should not have broken. Perhaps his homeowners insurance will cover the incident, but certain more infamous breeds are not insured. You are entitled to the total cost of your medical bills [you may have to pay them back so you are entitled to get them from the neighbor after all you pay the premiums for the medical coverage and someone else should not profit on that]. A demand letter to the neighbor may be sufficient for reimbursement. You are also entitled to something for pain and suffering.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 10/7/2013
    The Law Offices of Russell Gregory, P.C.
    The Law Offices of Russell Gregory, P.C. | Russell Gregory
    Hello. I'm sorry to hear that you are having to go through this. The matter is likely pursuable.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 10/7/2013
    Candiano Law Office
    Candiano Law Office | Charles J. Candiano
    It is possible. Small claims is your best bet.
    Answer Applies to: Illinois
    Replied: 10/7/2013
    Law Ofices of Edwin K. Niles | Edwin K. Niles
    You are entitled to be reimbursed for all out-of-pocket expenses, plus payment for pain and suffering.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 10/4/2013
    Ellis & Abouelsood | John Danelon
    Most likely yes, you would be able to sue for injuries and lost wages, but it is best to discuss the exact details with a law firm which offers free consultations. John P. Danelon NOTICE: Information contained in this transmission to the named addressee is proprietary information and is subject to attorney-client privilege and work product confidentiality. If the recipient of this transmission is not the named addressee, the recipient should immediately notify the sender and destroy the information transmitted without making any copy or distribution thereof. NOTICE: To ensure compliance with requirements imposed by the IRS, we inform you that any U.S. tax advice contained in this communication (including any attachments) is not intended or written to be used, and cannot be used, for the purpose of (a) avoiding penalties under the Internal Revenue Code; or (b) promoting, marketing or recommending to another party any transaction or tax-related matter addressed herein.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 10/4/2013
    Lewis B. Kaplan | Lewis B. Kaplan
    This answer is applicable to an Illinois "dog bite" claim. The claim is covered by the liability coverage of your neighbors homeowner's or renter's insurance. I advise you to meet with a lawyer as soon as possible to discuss claim further.
    Answer Applies to: Illinois
    Replied: 10/4/2013
    Paul Whitfield and Associates P.A.
    Paul Whitfield and Associates P.A. | Paul L. Whitfield
    Maybe. In NC you have to prove the dog has a vicious propensity. The fact that it was chained may suggest it has a history of attacking people or animals. If so, you can make a case.
    Answer Applies to: North Carolina
    Replied: 10/4/2013
    Gates' Law, PLLC | Thomas E. Gates
    You can submit a claim against his home insurance.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 10/4/2013
    Criminal Defense & Civil Litigation, LLC | Michael C. Witt
    You can sue for medical bills, pain & suffering and lost wages. If the dog has ever bitten a person or animal before, you may be entitled to double damages. Consult a personal injury attorney.
    Answer Applies to: Wisconsin
    Replied: 10/4/2013
    Belushin Law Firm, P.C.
    Belushin Law Firm, P.C. | Vel Belushin
    That might be possible and he might have insurance that covers this. Check with an attorney.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 10/4/2013
    Peters Law, PLLC
    Peters Law, PLLC | Mark T. Peters, Sr.
    Sure, but it may be easier to send him a letter and let him send it to his liability insurer and they will compromise.
    Answer Applies to: Idaho
    Replied: 10/4/2013
    Andrew T. Velonis, P.C.
    Andrew T. Velonis, P.C. | Andrew Velonis
    You certainly can. His insurance will pick up the tab, so it will cost him nothing. It is up to you to decide whether it's worthwhile to run the risk of bad neighbor relations. You can make your lawyer the bad guy, if he asks you, just say "I sure wouldn't be making a claim if it were going to cost you anything, my lawyer assured me that it would all come out of the insurance company". Do NOT try this on your own, you NEED a lawyer for this, the insurance company will not take you seriously without one.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 10/4/2013
    Hobbs Law Group
    Hobbs Law Group | Kristin E. Hobbs
    IT sounds like you have a case of negligence. Talk to a personal injury attorney to go over specific facts of the incident.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 10/4/2013
    Adler Law Group, LLC
    Adler Law Group, LLC | Lawrence Adler
    You have a claim for Strict liability for injuries from a dog. That includes medical bills, loss of work and pain and suffering and emotional distress. You should use counsel to maximize your recovery.
    Answer Applies to: Connecticut
    Replied: 10/4/2013
    Utah Injury Lawyer
    Utah Injury Lawyer | Will Rodgers
    Yes, you do have a legal claim for the injuries you sustained by being bitten by your neighbor's dog. In Utah, UCA 18-1-1 basically says that if a person's dog bites you the dog's owner is liable in injury for damages. The claim is submitted to the insurance company that insures your neighbor's home. Contact an injury lawyer to help you.
    Answer Applies to: Utah
    Replied: 10/4/2013
    Kelaher Law Offices, P.A.
    Kelaher Law Offices, P.A. | James P Kelaher
    Absolutely. In Florida, we have strict liability for dog bites. An owner of a dog is strictly liable for any injuries their dog causes if it bites someone else, so demand that the homeowner give you their homeowners insurance information. They are required by Section 627.4137, Florida Statutes, to provide you with that information within 30 days. In the meantime, start getting your evidence together, like your ER bills, documentation from your employer on your wages and proof that you missed time from work, and TAKE PICTURES OF THE BITE MARKS. That way, you'll have evidence to present to the insurance adjuster.
    Answer Applies to: Florida
    Replied: 10/4/2013
    Lombardi Law Firm
    Lombardi Law Firm | Steve Lombardi
    yes you can file a claim with his homeowner's insurance company.
    Answer Applies to: Iowa
    Replied: 10/4/2013
    Padove Law | Burton A. Padove
    Possibly. there are a number of factors involved in making that determination and one of those factors may depend on whether your local municipality has a dog ordinance regarding dog behavior. Contact an attorney who handles dog bite cases.
    Answer Applies to: Indiana
    Replied: 10/4/2013
    The Lariscy Law Firm, PC
    The Lariscy Law Firm, PC | Joseph E. Lariscy, III
    You should be able to make a claim on your neighbor's homeowner's insurance.
    Answer Applies to: Georgia
    Replied: 10/4/2013
    James E. Hasser, Jr. P.C.
    James E. Hasser, Jr. P.C. | Jim Hasser
    Possibly, if the owner knew the dog had vicious propensities and didn't take adequate precautions to restrain him.
    Answer Applies to: Alabama
    Replied: 10/4/2013
    End, Hierseman & Crain, LLC | J. Michael End
    You have a good case against your neighbor's homeowner's insurance company. You should consult with a lawyer as soon as you can to be sure everything is handled appropriately.
    Answer Applies to: Wisconsin
    Replied: 10/4/2013
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