Is there a difference between a court conviction and a guilty plea? 95 Answers as of July 02, 2013

Is there a difference between a court conviction and a guilty plea? For instance, if a person pleads guilty to a crime does that mean he/she has been convicted?

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Law office of Robert D. Scott | Robert Scott
No.
Answer Applies to: Maryland
Replied: 5/30/2013
Law Offices of Phil Hache
Law Offices of Phil Hache | Phil Hache
If a person enters a guilty plea, the court will then convict and sentence the person based on the guilty plea.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 1/13/2012
Rudolph A. Serra, Attorney
Rudolph A. Serra, Attorney | Rudolph A. Serra
Yes.
Answer Applies to: Michigan
Replied: 6/2/2013
Cornish, Crowley, Rockafellow, & Sartz, PLLC
Cornish, Crowley, Rockafellow, & Sartz, PLLC | Jacob Peter Sartz IV
They are different stages in the process. The guilty plea is one stage; the sentencing is the final stage and when the actual "conviction" enters. People, of course, also have a right to appeal. People may also elect to file a motion to withdraw their plea. However, sentencing is usually when the offense is treated as a "conviction" and the person is sentenced for the offense. Occasionally, a judge will sentence a person on the same day as a plea. However, with more serious matters (felonies, occasionally some misdemeanor offenses) the judge usually sets the sentencing date for a pre-sentence interview and requests a pre-sentence report prior to sentencing. It should be noted, though, that for certain traffic offenses, the court will send an abstract to the Secretary of State after a plea and before a conviction. This means a person may be facing license sanctions even before their conviction is entered.
Answer Applies to: Michigan
Replied: 1/4/2012
Michael Breczinski
Michael Breczinski | Michael Breczinski
A guilty plea, no contest plea and a conviction after trial are all the same, the person is deemed guilty of the charge.
Answer Applies to: Michigan
Replied: 1/3/2012
    Burdon and Merlitti
    Burdon and Merlitti | Adam Van Ho
    If a person has pled guilty, and the court has accepted the guilty plea, then yes he/she is convicted. The same occurs when a person enters a no contest plea, and the court subsequently finds the individual guilty.
    Answer Applies to: Ohio
    Replied: 1/3/2012
    Edward  D. Dowling IV Attorney at Law
    Edward D. Dowling IV Attorney at Law | Edward D. Dowling IV
    The legal effect of a conviction and a guilty plea is the same. Generally when you use the term conviction it means you were found guilty after a trial as opposed to a guilty plea ( no trial ).
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 12/30/2011
    Timothy J. Thill P.C.
    Timothy J. Thill P.C. | Timothy J. Thill
    It depends on what the agreed upon sentence was in the plea. If in Illinois and the offense was a misdemenor, it is highly likely that the person got supervision, if a first time offender, which is not a conviction which would be on his record for the rest of his life. However, if the offense was a felony, more likely than not, the conviction will be permanently on his record.
    Answer Applies to: Illinois
    Replied: 12/29/2011
    Gregory Casale Attorney at Law
    Gregory Casale Attorney at Law | Gregory Casale
    If a person pleads guilty it is effectively no different than a conviction. If the person plead Guilty but the court continued the case without a finding (CWOF) for some period of time, that is not a conviction.
    Answer Applies to: Massachusetts
    Replied: 12/27/2011
    Law Office of Phillip Weiser
    Law Office of Phillip Weiser | Phillip L. Weiser
    There is no difference as to the way a conviction is obtained. The conviction is the same.
    Answer Applies to: Kansas
    Replied: 12/27/2011
    Theresa Hofmeister, Attorney At Law
    Theresa Hofmeister, Attorney At Law | Theresa Hofmeister
    Conviction by trial or conviction by guilty plea, both are convictions.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 12/27/2011
    Fagan, Fagan & Davis
    Fagan, Fagan & Davis | Steven H. Fagan
    There are instances in which a plea of guilty does not necessarily mean a conviction will result. For a common example, in eligible cases, a plea of guilty can result in an order of Court Supervision. Successful completion of the requirements of a sentence of Court Supervision in Illinois results in the termination of the case without entry of a judgment of conviction.
    Answer Applies to: Illinois
    Replied: 12/22/2011
    Mark Thiessen, Attorney at Law
    Mark Thiessen, Attorney at Law | Mark Thiessen
    Yes, if a person pleads guilty it is a conviction and will stay on your record for life. Be very careful and make sure your attorney is fighting for you.
    Answer Applies to: Texas
    Replied: 12/22/2011
    Law Office of Richard Williams
    Law Office of Richard Williams | Richard Williams
    If a person pleads guilty they are convicted upon the court accepting the guilty plea.
    Answer Applies to: Alabama
    Replied: 12/22/2011
    Law Office of Eric Sterkenburg
    Law Office of Eric Sterkenburg | Eric Sterkenburg
    The main difference between a conviction by trial and a plea of guilty is that you cannot appeal a guilty plea.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 12/22/2011
    Jules N. Fiani, Attorney at Law
    Jules N. Fiani, Attorney at Law | Jules Fiani
    No.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 5/30/2013
    The Gorman Law Firm | Scott Gorman
    The guilty plea is an admission by a defendant that he or she committed a particular offense. Essentially, by admitting guilt, a defendant skips the trial at which a judge or jury would make a determination as to whether or not the defendant was guilty. The conviction is based on a finding of guilt, but it is not complete until after the defendant is sentenced.
    Answer Applies to: New Jersey
    Replied: 12/21/2011
    Cynthia Henley, Lawyer
    Cynthia Henley, Lawyer | Cynthia Henley
    If one pleads guilty and has signed a document admitting all the elements, then one will be found guilty. A guilty plea is the act of pleading guilty. A conviction is the resulting determination by a judge or jury upon a guilty or not guilty plea.
    Answer Applies to: Texas
    Replied: 12/21/2011
    The Law Office of Cindy Barton
    The Law Office of Cindy Barton | Cindy Barton
    There is not a difference. Both a guilty plea and a finding by a judge or a jury that you are guilty results in a conviction being entered on your record.
    Answer Applies to: Utah
    Replied: 12/21/2011
    LynchLaw
    LynchLaw | Michael Thomas Lynch
    I am not sure what you are looking for, but there are differences. For instance, if you plea no contest the court will accept your plea and find you guilty. The main purpose of a no contest plea is to prevent the conviction from being used against you in a civil case. If you are found guilty, or plead guilty, that result can be used in a civil case to establish liability. However, if you plead no contest then a plaintiff in a civil case will still need to establish liability.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 12/21/2011
    Myles Hahn III Attorney at Law | Myles Hahn III
    When someone is charged with a crime, they may plead guilty or not guilty. If they plead not guilty and go to trial, then they will be found either guilty or not guilty. So, pleading guilty is one of many ways to be found guilty. Once the judge makes a finding that you are guilty, then the court can sentence you. The judge has many options. On some misdemeanor offenses, he can sentence someone to court supervision. There are other options.
    Answer Applies to: Illinois
    Replied: 12/21/2011
    Law Offices of William W. Burns | William W. Burns
    There is virtually no difference between a conviction based on a trial, verdict and a plea of guilty or no contest. If a person pleads guilty to a crime, that is conviction.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 12/21/2011
    Law Office of Michael E. Dailey
    Law Office of Michael E. Dailey | Michael E. Dailey
    A guilty plea is an admission of facts in court and on the record. A finding of guilty after trial by Judge or jury is not an admission by the defendant. In Missouri a conviction occurs when a sentence (or fine) is pronounced by the court. A finding of guilt by trial or plea is not a "conviction" until sentencing has occurred.
    Answer Applies to: Missouri
    Replied: 12/21/2011
    Germaine & Blaszka, P.A.
    Germaine & Blaszka, P.A. | Donald L. Blaszka, Jr.
    When a person pleads guilty to a criminal offense that means you have been convicted of the offense because you have waived a number of rights including your right to have a trial.
    Answer Applies to: New Hampshire
    Replied: 12/21/2011
    Glojek Ltd | Joseph E. Redding
    A guilty plea is one way for the court to find you guilty of a crime. The other is a jury trial. If a person pleads guilty, the vast majority of the time the court will find the person guilty and enter a judgment of conviction on the record. However, a court can accept a guilty plea, but withhold the judgment of conviction. This is what commonly occurs in deferred prosecution agreements. The person pleads guilty at the same time he or she enters into an agreement with the state. IF they complete the agreement, the court dismisses the case, and the plea does result in a conviction being entered.
    Answer Applies to: Wisconsin
    Replied: 12/21/2011
    Robert Valles and Associates P.C.
    Robert Valles and Associates P.C. | Robert Valles Jr.
    It depends if he is pleading guilty and agreeing to deferred adjudication. Then there is no conviction.
    Answer Applies to: Texas
    Replied: 12/21/2011
    Palumbo and Kosofsky
    Palumbo and Kosofsky | Michael Palumbo
    Absolutely a plea of "guilty" is exactly the same as being found guilty after trial.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 12/21/2011
    Robert Mortland
    Robert Mortland | Law Office of Robert Mortland
    A conviction is a conviction regardless of how you were convicted. A guilty or no contest plea is a conviction.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 12/21/2011
    The McDonnell Law Firm, PLLC
    The McDonnell Law Firm, PLLC | Patrick J. McDonnell
    No.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 5/30/2013
    Betts Legal Services
    Betts Legal Services | Shawn M. Betts
    Whether or not you have a conviction depends on the way the matter is sentenced and the level of charge. If you plead guilty to a petty misdmeanor, you do not have criminal conviction, as petty misdemeanors are considered non-criminal infractions. If you plead to a misdemeanor, gross misdemeanor, or felony, and have your sentenced executed, receive a stay of execution, or a stay of imposition, you have a conviction on your record. If you are given a stay of adjudication, you do not have a conviction.
    Answer Applies to: Minnesota
    Replied: 12/21/2011
    Law Office of Michael R. Garber
    Law Office of Michael R. Garber | Michael R. Garber
    There's no difference.
    Answer Applies to: Louisiana
    Replied: 12/21/2011
    Raiser & Kenniff, PC
    Raiser & Kenniff, PC | Steve Raiser
    There is no difference. A conviction based on a plea is the same as a conviction after trial.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 12/21/2011
    Law Office of Edward J. Blum
    Law Office of Edward J. Blum | Edward J. Blum
    It is the same thing.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 12/21/2011
    Healan Law Offices
    Healan Law Offices | William D. Healan, III
    A guilty plea leads to a conviction. If a person pleads guilty, he has been convicted.
    Answer Applies to: Georgia
    Replied: 12/21/2011
    Reeves Law Firm, P.C.
    Reeves Law Firm, P.C. | Roy L. Reeves
    It depends. You can plea guilty and still be put on deferred adjudication. If you are on deferred, you are on probation but you are not convicted. If you screw up probation, the DA files a Motion to Adjudicate and then you are convicted. If you complete probation, you can file a petition to non-disclose the arrest (your criminal record will show arrested for the alleged crime this entire time but will not show any conviction, the ND Order basically seals the arrest record). Many courts, in fact most, require a guilty plea before putting you on deferred adjudication. Accordingly, if you plea guilty, whether or not you are convicted depends on the Judge's ruling.
    Answer Applies to: Texas
    Replied: 12/21/2011
    Allan & Summary
    Allan & Summary | Justin Summary
    Yes there is a difference. For a conviction to happen the court must impose a sentence, if the court does not impose a sentence (i.e. the court suspends imposition of sentence) there will not be a conviction if that person can successfully complete their probation even though they pled guilty.
    Answer Applies to: Missouri
    Replied: 12/21/2011
    Charles M. Schiff, Attorney at Law
    Charles M. Schiff, Attorney at Law | Charles M. Schiff
    Yes, a plea of guilty to a charged crime does result in a conviction. The conviction is the same as would result from a verdict of guilty after trial. The only difference involves your right to appeal. If you plead guilty to an offense you waive the right to appeal the conviction. If you are found guilty following a trial, you maintain the right to appeal that conviction, assuming there is a basis for appeal.
    Answer Applies to: Minnesota
    Replied: 12/21/2011
    Rhoades & Miller, LLP
    Rhoades & Miller, LLP | M. Jason Rhoades
    On a criminal record, there is absolutely no difference between a plea of guilty and a finding of guilt by a judge or jury. The difference comes in sometimes at sentencing, where a prosecutor will make a better sentence recommendation if you plead without making everyone go through the trouble of a trial.
    Answer Applies to: Georgia
    Replied: 12/21/2011
    Law Office of Peter F. Goldscheider
    Law Office of Peter F. Goldscheider | Peter Goldscheider
    A conviction can arise from either a plea of guilty or no contest. It can also arise from a trial by either a jury or a court. They all count equally as convictions.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 12/21/2011
    Law Offices of Lorenzo L. Angelino | Lorenzo L. Angelino
    There is no difference with respect to your record.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 12/21/2011
    Law Office of Brendan M. Kelly
    Law Office of Brendan M. Kelly | Brendan M. Kelly
    The only real difference is that if a court convicts a person it would be following some type of evidence. A guilty plea speeds up the process. Both are convictions.
    Answer Applies to: Nebraska
    Replied: 12/21/2011
    The Jarrett Firm, LLC
    The Jarrett Firm, LLC | Patrick Jarrett
    Yes. Pleading guilty is a conviction. It is essentially an admission of guilt.
    Answer Applies to: Georgia
    Replied: 12/21/2011
    H. Scott Basham, Attorney at Law, P.C. | H. Scott Basham
    Yes, a guilty plea is just as much a conviction as a verdict after a trial.
    Answer Applies to: Georgia
    Replied: 12/21/2011
    Goolsby Law Office
    Goolsby Law Office | Richard Goolsby
    Yes, generally, there are several ways to be convicted including: by guilty plea, or being found guilty by a judge or jury. We recommend you see a criminal lawyer to discuss your rights and options in each case. Good luck.
    Answer Applies to: Georgia
    Replied: 12/21/2011
    Keyser Law Firm
    Keyser Law Firm | Christopher W. Keyser
    For a person to be convicted of a crime, s/he must be found guilty either by a judge, a jury or by voluntarily admitting guilt. If a person pleads guilty to a crime and the court accepts the guilty plea, the person is then convicted. If a person has a trial before a judge or jury, s/he is convicted if the judge or jury believe the person is guilty of the crime.
    Answer Applies to: Minnesota
    Replied: 12/21/2011
    Law Office of Jared Altman
    Law Office of Jared Altman | Jared Altman
    No. There's no difference.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 12/21/2011
    Harden Law Offices
    Harden Law Offices | Leonard D. Harden
    No difference if plea or found guilty both are convictions. If a nolo contendre plea then no civil liability but still a conviction.
    Answer Applies to: New Hampshire
    Replied: 12/21/2011
    Craig W. Elhart, P.C.
    Craig W. Elhart, P.C. | Craig Elhart
    There is no difference.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 12/21/2011
    Bronx Criminal Lawyer
    Bronx Criminal Lawyer | Peter J. Schaffer
    There is no difference between a conviction based upon a guilty plea and a conviction based upon a conviction after trial. Frequently people choose to plead guilty to resolve their cases with lesser charges and/or to lock in an agreed upon more favorable sentence.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 12/21/2011
    Flood Lanctot Connor Stablein, PLLC
    Flood Lanctot Connor Stablein, PLLC | Paul J. Stablein
    No difference exists between a conviction by guilty plea and a conviction that results from a trial, as it relates to a defendant's criminal record. However, differences do exist as it relates to whether or not the defendant has a right to appeal, or as it relates to the sentence, as most plea based convictions are associated with some type of plea bargain or sentence bargain.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 12/21/2011
    Jon M. Martinez Criminal Law Group | Jon M. Martinez
    No, there is no difference between a guilty plea and a conviction after trial. Both are considered convictions on your criminal record.
    Answer Applies to: Arizona
    Replied: 12/21/2011
    Law Offices of Steven R. Hunter | Steven Hunter
    Yes. A person who pleads guilty has been convicted as soon as the judgment is entered into the record.
    Answer Applies to: Illinois
    Replied: 12/21/2011
    Thomas J. Tomko Attorney At law
    Thomas J. Tomko Attorney At law | Thomas J. Tomko
    There is really no difference, as the plea is the conviction. The person's plea allows the court to enter the plea of guilt. This plea is the result in the case, which is a finding of guilt.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 12/21/2011
    Law Office of Rankin Johnson IV, LLC
    Law Office of Rankin Johnson IV, LLC | Rankin Johnson IV
    A guilty plea and a guilty verdict after trial both lead to a conviction. For most purposes, a "conviction" means a judgment of guilt and a sentence. And a "judgment" is the official document signed by a judge and contained in the court file. (A "judgment" is the end of most court cases; for example, it might be a criminal judgment of conviction and sentence, a civil judgment requiring a person to pay damages, or a judgment of dismissal.) A plea of guilty, and a verdict of guilt after a jury or court trial lead to a judgment of conviction in most cases, but they are two separate events.
    Answer Applies to: Oregon
    Replied: 12/21/2011
    Beaulier Law Office
    Beaulier Law Office | Maury Beaulier
    The result is the same whether by plea or verdict of a Jury. The person would have a conviction for the offense to which they enter a plea.
    Answer Applies to: Minnesota
    Replied: 12/21/2011
    Law Firm of Martin & Wallentine
    Law Firm of Martin & Wallentine | Jerry Lee Wallentine Jr.
    A guilty plea will equal a conviction.
    Answer Applies to: Kansas
    Replied: 12/21/2011
    Law Offices of Martina A. Vigil, PC
    Law Offices of Martina A. Vigil, PC | Martina A. Vigil
    Yes. A conviction can be achieved a couple of ways, a defendant can admit the allegations or he can be found guilty by a jury.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 12/21/2011
    Hammerschmidt Broughton Law
    Hammerschmidt Broughton Law | Mark A. Broughton
    Yes. A guilty plea is the same as a jury verdict, as far as a conviction is concerned.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 12/21/2011
    Law Offices of John Carney
    Law Offices of John Carney | John Carney
    If you plead guilty or are convicted at trial of a crime you will have a criminal conviction for that crime unless it is a violation as opposed to a misdemeanor or felony. In New York State you cannot have a criminal conviction removed from your record. If you were under 19 you are eligible for Youthful Offender Treatment and it would not be a criminal conviction.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 12/21/2011
    Meyer & Kiss, LLC | Daniel Kiss
    A plea of guilty results in a conviction just as if a person was found guilty after a trial. The only exception is in certain misdemeanor cases where supervision is the sentence. A sentence of supervision means there was a finding of guilt (either by plea or after trial), but it does not count as a conviction.
    Answer Applies to: Illinois
    Replied: 12/21/2011
    Kelly A. Broadbent, Esq.
    Kelly A. Broadbent, Esq. | Kelly Broadbent
    If a person pleads guilty, it is the same on the person's record as if a trial was conducted and the person was found guilty. In Massachusetts, there are pleas that admit sufficient facts rather than guilt. This plea has a probation term where at the end of probation the matter is dismissed. This is not the same as a guilty plea or conviction.
    Answer Applies to: Massachusetts
    Replied: 12/21/2011
    The Chastaine Law Office
    The Chastaine Law Office | Michael Chastaine
    No difference both are a conviction.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 12/20/2011
    Jason Overton, Attorney at Law
    Jason Overton, Attorney at Law | Jason Overton
    It is the same effect. A judge finds you guilty based upon your plea of guilty, and a conviction is entered in your record with the same effect as a conviction following a trial where the jury determines that you're guilty.
    Answer Applies to: Alabama
    Replied: 12/20/2011
    Austin Legal Services, PLC
    Austin Legal Services, PLC | Jared Austin
    If you plead guilty that is considered a conviction. It is tantamount to proof beyond a reasonable doubt as if you had been convicted at trial by either a judge or jury. The only difference is that you voluntarily give up your right to trial and plead guilty as opposed to being found guilty. They are one in the same.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 12/20/2011
    Law Office of Ronald Aronds, LLC
    Law Office of Ronald Aronds, LLC | Ronald Aronds
    If you plead guilty you will have a conviction.
    Answer Applies to: New Jersey
    Replied: 12/20/2011
    John P Yetter | John Yetter
    There is a difference between the two. A plea or finding of guilty leads to a sentencing. A judgment of conviction is one potential part of a sentence.
    Answer Applies to: Illinois
    Replied: 12/20/2011
    Michael Maltby, Attorney at Law
    Michael Maltby, Attorney at Law | Michael Maltby
    You are considered to have a conviction upon entry of a plea (of guilt). All that is remains is to be sentenced.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 12/20/2011
    Aaron Black Law
    Aaron Black Law | Aaron Black
    If a person pleaded guilty of a crime then they have been convicted of a crime.
    Answer Applies to: Arizona
    Replied: 7/2/2013
    THOMAS G. GILL, P.A. | Thomas G Gill
    Yes. If you are found guilty whether by trial or plea. It is considered a conviction. However, in Maryland you can receive what's called probation before judgment which is not considered a conviction.
    Answer Applies to: Maryland
    Replied: 12/20/2011
    The Law Offices of Stephen L. Richards | Stephen L. Richards
    If a person pleads guilty and judgment is entered (that means the judge accepts the plea and makes the conviction official) then there is a conviction.
    Answer Applies to: Illinois
    Replied: 12/20/2011
    Fairlie & Lippy, P.C.
    Fairlie & Lippy, P.C. | Steven Fairlie
    A guilty plea is not a conviction - but the sentence that usually follows it is. If you were sentenced, meaning to pay a fine, probation, or jail time, then it was a conviction. If you got ARD or Section 17, then even being put on probation does not equate to a conviction because it is not a formal sentence in those instances. You should talk with a lawyer to have your circumstances evaluated.
    Answer Applies to: Pennsylvania
    Replied: 12/20/2011
    Miel & Carr, PLC
    Miel & Carr, PLC | Keeley D Heath
    Yes. A guilty plea is a conviction.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 5/30/2013
    Thomas C. Brandstrader Attorney At Law | Thomas C. Brandstrader
    No.
    Answer Applies to: Illinois
    Replied: 5/30/2013
    Lawrence Lewis
    Lawrence Lewis | Lawrence Lewis, PC
    A guilty plea is a conviction. A conviction by a jury trial is a conviction. The difference will probably come in the sentencing. More time for a trial, where the person does not accept responsibility.
    Answer Applies to: Georgia
    Replied: 12/20/2011
    Andersen Law PLLC
    Andersen Law PLLC | Craig Andersen
    A conviction is the same as a plea of guilty in the eyes of the law.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 12/20/2011
    Freeborn Law Offices, P.S.
    Freeborn Law Offices, P.S. | Steve Freeborn
    Once the plea is accepted by the judge, then there is no difference. A plea to the charge results in a conviction, just as if the case had been tried.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 12/20/2011
    Attorney at Law | Ruchee Patel
    Both a verdict of guilt by a jury and a voluntary plea of guilt are convictions. They are different, but for the purposes of the question, yes, its the same result on your record.
    Answer Applies to: Tennessee
    Replied: 12/20/2011
    Law Office of James E. Smith
    Law Office of James E. Smith | James Smith
    When you plead guilty you are convicted just as if a jury returned a guilty verdict.
    Answer Applies to: Nevada
    Replied: 12/20/2011
    Rothstein Law PLLC
    Rothstein Law PLLC | Eric Rothstein
    Pleading guilty is the same as being convicted after trial. Either way it's a conviction.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 12/20/2011
    Law Office of Richard Southard
    Law Office of Richard Southard | Richard C Southard
    Yes, a conviction is the same whether it is after trial or by plea.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 12/20/2011
    Matthew Cameron Attorney at Law
    Matthew Cameron Attorney at Law | Matt Cameron
    For federal immigration purposes, pleas are almost always considered to be conviction seven if the state in which the plea was taken would not consider the plea to be a conviction (such as a continuance without a finding in Massachusetts).
    Answer Applies to: Massachusetts
    Replied: 12/20/2011
    Ellman and Ellman PC
    Ellman and Ellman PC | Kevin Ellmann
    Usually, a guilty plea results in a conviction. However, there are circumstances when this is NOT the case. For example, a "Deferred Judgment and Sentence" involves a plea of guilty without the Court officially entering a judgment of conviction on that plea pending the defendant completing certain terms and conditions. If those terms and conditions are satisfied, the plea is eventually withdrawn and the charge dismissed. In this scenario, there never was a conviction despite the (temporary) guilty plea. If the terms and conditions are not satisfied, the judge enters judgment on the plea (conviction) and imposes sentence.
    Answer Applies to: Colorado
    Replied: 12/20/2011
    Gutin and Wolverton
    Gutin and Wolverton | Harley Gutin
    Yes. A guilty plea or a no contest plea are treated the same. If you plea with an agreement to be adjudicated or you plea to the Court and the court adjudicates you guilty it is the same. If the Court or plea agreement calls for a "withholding of adjudication" then you will not be a "convicted felon". However, that has limited meaning as the federal government does not recognize the "withholding of adjudication". Nor does most business that require security clearances.
    Answer Applies to: Florida
    Replied: 12/20/2011
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