Could the landlord be legally responsible for her fractured rib? How? 17 Answers as of June 02, 2015

There is no grip on the ramp in front of my mothers rental property. She fractured her rib. Could the landlord be responsible for her injuries?

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Law Offices of Carl L. Brown | Carl L. Brown
Liability depends on a number of factors, including prior accidents and whether there is a building code violation. You should contact an experienced personal injury attorney.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 6/2/2015
James E. Hasser, Jr. P.C.
James E. Hasser, Jr. P.C. | Jim Hasser
It depends on whether not having the grip makes the ramp a dangerous condition which the landlord knew or should have known about and failed install, fix or warn against. Just because she got hurt on the landlord's premises, doesn't necessarily make the landlord liable. You have to prove they did something wrong to cause your mother to get hurt. Consider consulting an experienced injury lawyer familiar with premises liability cases. Good luck.
Answer Applies to: Alabama
Replied: 6/2/2015
Law Offices of Ronald A. Steinberg & Associates | Ronald A. Steinberg, BA, MA, JD
Not enough information. Under Michigan law, the owner of the property is required to provide "common areas which are reasonably fit for the purpose intended by the parties."
Answer Applies to: Michigan
Replied: 6/2/2015
Utah Injury Lawyer
Utah Injury Lawyer | Will Rodgers
The answer is yes, potentially, depending on the facts. Contact an injury lawyer to discuss your mother's potential premises liability (slip and fall) case on the phone to find out if she has a case and, if so, to meet in-office for a free consultation. Good luck. I hope your mother recovers well from her broken rib.
Answer Applies to: Utah
Replied: 6/2/2015
Gates' Law, PLLC | Thomas E. Gates
Need more information. Also, the injury is to minor to purse in a lawsuit. You can take him to small claims to recover any medical expenses.
Answer Applies to: Washington
Replied: 6/2/2015
    Bulman Law Associates PLLC Injury Law Firm
    Bulman Law Associates PLLC Injury Law Firm | Thomas Bulman
    Probably not.
    Answer Applies to: Montana
    Replied: 6/2/2015
    Richard B. Jacobson & Associates, LLC | Richard B. Jacobson
    Possibly. One important question was how much of a role did her own carelessness play in the accident? Another is whether there is a zoning or building code violation in the way the ramp was constructed. These answers are probably not hard to find. Consult an experienced personal injury lawyer. Good Luck.
    Answer Applies to: Wisconsin
    Replied: 6/2/2015
    Andrew T. Velonis, P.C.
    Andrew T. Velonis, P.C. | Andrew Velonis
    Possibly. Investigation would have to be made as to exactly what happened and whether the landlord knew or should have known of the hazard and had the opportunity to correct it before the injury occurred.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 6/2/2015
    Kelaher Law Offices, P.A.
    Kelaher Law Offices, P.A. | James P Kelaher
    Possibly, but I would consult with a good personal injury lawyer and allow them to investigate the facts more fully.
    Answer Applies to: Florida
    Replied: 6/2/2015
    Pius Joseph A Professional Law Corp. | Pius Joseph
    You need to be specific about the injuries and what you mean by:no grip: If the condition is a dangerous condition. You may be able to pursue a personal injury claim. Good Luck.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 6/2/2015
    Law Office of Lisa Hurtado McDonnell | Lisa Hurtado McDonnell
    Maybe, why did your mother fall? Does she has any medical issues or property steps in disrepair?
    Answer Applies to: Utah
    Replied: 6/1/2015
    Musilli Brennan Associates PLLC
    Musilli Brennan Associates PLLC | John F Brennan
    Perhaps, but quite unlikely. See an attorney with the details.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 6/1/2015
    The Law Offices of Russell Gregory, P.C.
    The Law Offices of Russell Gregory, P.C. | Russell Gregory
    Absolutely. This matter would have to be discussed fully, to ascertain the best theories upon which to proceed. But, no means of supporting oneself on a ramp or stairs is most likely a strong case. The statute of limitations is 3 years, but don't delay, as waiting only hurts the case (evidence gets lost, witnesses become un-findable, etc.). Also, lawyers won't take cases without adequate time to work them up, and there?s a lot to be done before pursuing a matter. If your mom is serious, pursue it now.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 6/1/2015
    Gregory M Janks, PC
    Gregory M Janks, PC | Gregory M Janks
    In Michigan the landlord must provide a habitable premises pursuant to statute. If your mother can show there was some defect that the landlord either created and/or had knowledge of and had sufficient time to repair same, then there could be liability. However cases cost money to pursue and if damages are not sufficient, it may not make economic sense to file a lawsuit. Some cases can be informally presented and possible settled without starting litigation. This usually depends on the facts of the incident, whether there was negligence on the landlords part, and whether the parties/insurers are interested in settling vs. suing. Also there may be some "medical pay" coverage that can contribute toward any uninsured medical bills without regard to who was/wasn't at fault. As I always indicate, it is best to consult local counsel that regularly handles these type of cases for an analysis of the facts, liability, law, damages and what can/can't be done.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 6/1/2015
    Adler Law Group, LLC
    Adler Law Group, LLC | Lawrence Adler
    The short answer is yes but it will depend on a number of factors. Ultimately looks landlord must act in a reasonable fashion. What is reasonable varies from case to case. If he knows their elderly tenants he has a duty to look after their safety.
    Answer Applies to: Connecticut
    Replied: 6/1/2015
    Law Ofices of Edwin K. Niles | Edwin K. Niles
    Slip and fall cases are, by their nature, difficult. First, you must be able to prove negligence on the part of the property owner/occupant. Negligence could be defined as the failure to use REASONABLE care; the owner is not a guarantor. To do this, you must be able to prove that the owner put the slippery substance there, or that they had prior knowledge of the hazard and failed to take care of it promptly. Second, they will claim comparative fault, meaning that you had a duty to watch where you were walking, and thus are partly at fault. The result is that most lawyers are reluctant to take a slip and fall case unless there are substantial damages, and there are at least some arguments to be made on the question of fault.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 6/1/2015
    Law Offices of George H. Shers | George H. Shers
    If the lack of a handrail is what caused the injury, the landlord might be legally responsible, although your mother might also have some responsibility. Have her speak to several local personal injury attorneys as to what happened to see what they think after hearing all the facts.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 6/1/2015
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