Can your attorney drop your case with 3 years involved? 4 Answers as of January 27, 2015

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Law Ofices of Edwin K. Niles | Edwin K. Niles
Yes, an attorney can drop a case, but he/she should not do so in a manner that adversely affects the client. In other words, if a trial date is a week away, or something like that, the client would have cause to complain.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 1/27/2015
Law Offices of Robert Burns
Law Offices of Robert Burns | Robert Burns
If the case was in litigation the attorney is stuck with your case until (a) a *Substitution of Attorney *form is signed by you, served, and filed or (b) the Court issues an order that the attorney is relieved from further representing you.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 1/27/2015
WEISSMAN LAW FIRM
WEISSMAN LAW FIRM | I.Donald Weissman
Yes and no. It depends where in the process the case is. If you are an adult and a lawsuit has been filed, it is difficult for the attorney to withdraw the closer the case gets to the trial date. If you let the lawyer out the "prejudice" may be waived. If there is sufficient time to get another lawyer before the trial, consider it. It may be easier in the long run.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 1/27/2015
Frank Law Group, P.C.
Frank Law Group, P.C. | David E. Frank
Normally the court will not allow an attorney to withdraw if the trial date is imminent. However, if the attorney has "dropped" you case, your best bet is to look for a new attorney. Often, personal injury attorney's won't take cases unless there is a substantial likelihood of getting a large settlement. If it's a low impact case, with little in the way of damages, an attorney who takes on that kind of case often later regrets it, giving it little attention as time goes on. I'm not saying it's right, it's just the way it is. Best bet is to find another lawyer to review the file and give you a second opinion as to what you can reasonably expect.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 1/27/2015
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