Can you travel within the United States with a misdemeanor charge? 49 Answers as of June 10, 2013

Can you travel within the United States with a misdemeanor charge?

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Lacy Fields, Attorney at Law, LLC
Lacy Fields, Attorney at Law, LLC | Lacy Fields
Yes, that should not be a problem at all. The only complication may be if you are on probation. If so, you are supposed to check with your probation officer before leaving your county of residence.
Answer Applies to: Missouri
Replied: 6/3/2011
Thomas J. Tomko Attorney At law
Thomas J. Tomko Attorney At law | Thomas J. Tomko
As a general rule, a misdemeanor conviction would not be expected to affect travel within the US. If still on probation, then the answer will be different and you should consult the terms of probation. However, even if probation is over, there may be exceptions depending on the conviction and how long the person remains in one place. If the matter is just a charge and not a conviction, then the terms of bond should be consulted. Ordinarily, a bond condition may be expected which restricts the person from leaving the state without prior Court permission. The best approach is to retain an attorney to review your case and give appropriate advice. I hope that this was helpful.
Answer Applies to: Michigan
Replied: 5/31/2011
The Law Office of Harry E. Hudson, Jr.
The Law Office of Harry E. Hudson, Jr. | Harry E. Hudson, Jr.
Depends. If you are not in the middle of the case and ordered to remain in the state/county , yes.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 5/27/2011
Timothy J. Thill P.C.
Timothy J. Thill P.C. | Timothy J. Thill
If you are on bond, pending disposition of your case, you are prohibited from travel outside the state. If you have been found guilty, and sentenced to probation, supervision or conditional discharge, and are currently under said sentence, you must get permission from the probation officer or social service officer handling your case before leaving the state. If granted permission to leave by him, or by a judge, you may travel outside the state.
Answer Applies to: Illinois
Replied: 5/27/2011
Edward  D. Dowling IV Attorney at Law
Edward D. Dowling IV Attorney at Law | Edward D. Dowling IV
If you are not in custody and there is no court order that you can not travel out of the court's jurisdiction, then generally you can go where you want , even out of the country, provided you appear in court for all court appearances.
Answer Applies to: New York
Replied: 5/27/2011
    Michael Anthony Wing, P.C.
    Michael Anthony Wing, P.C. | Michael Anthony Wing
    Most probably yes, but you would need the permission of the court and bonding company if you are talking about a pending charge. Stay well.
    Answer Applies to: Alabama
    Replied: 5/26/2011
    Law Office of Richard Williams
    Law Office of Richard Williams | Richard Williams
    There are normally no travel restriction when one is charged with a misdemeanor. There can be travel restrictions if a person is on probation with a misdemeanor conviction if the Court imposes same.
    Answer Applies to: Alabama
    Replied: 5/25/2011
    LynchLaw
    LynchLaw | Michael Thomas Lynch
    Typically, yes. If you did not bail out, but were just cited to appear, the court could set bail or set limits for you release. However, such an arrangement would be very rare.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 5/25/2011
    Anderson & Carnahan
    Anderson & Carnahan | Stephen Anderson
    Normally, yes, unless it would be a violation of your bond conditions.
    Answer Applies to: Colorado
    Replied: 5/25/2011
    Nelson & Lawless
    Nelson & Lawless | Terry Nelson
    Unless there is a court order or probation term restricting your movement.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 5/26/2011
    Law Offices of Steven R. Decker
    Law Offices of Steven R. Decker | Steven Decker
    If the case is currently pending you need permission of the judge to travel outside the state as it is a condition of your bond not to leave the state without the court expanding the conditions of the bond.
    Answer Applies to: Illinois
    Replied: 5/26/2011
    Law Office of Brendan M. Kelly
    Law Office of Brendan M. Kelly | Brendan M. Kelly
    You should not have any travel restrictions, trouble to go to Canada with a DUI.
    Answer Applies to: Nebraska
    Replied: 5/26/2011
    Palumbo and Kosofsky
    Palumbo and Kosofsky | Michael Palumbo
    Yes, unless the terms of bail or a sentence prohibit it.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 5/26/2011
    Law Office of Michael Moody
    Law Office of Michael Moody | Michael Moody
    Yes.
    Answer Applies to: Georgia
    Replied: 6/10/2013
    Law Office of Phillip Weiser
    Law Office of Phillip Weiser | Phillip L. Weiser
    Yes, you should have no restrictions.
    Answer Applies to: Kansas
    Replied: 5/26/2011
    Cornish, Crowley, Rockafellow, & Sartz, PLLC
    Cornish, Crowley, Rockafellow, & Sartz, PLLC | Jacob Peter Sartz IV
    Generally, travel restrictions are less strict with misdemeanor charges; however, the policies vary significantly depending on the judge, the prior criminal history of the person charged, the particular court, county, and the type of charge. Felony bonds generally prohibit any out-of-state travel. However, that may be amended with the court's permission. The safest route to avoid any potential issues with travel out-of-state while on bond for either a misdemeanor or felony is to ask for the court for permission. A motion to modify the bond may be necessary. If you need specific legal advice, I would recommend retaining an attorney to assist you with this matter. Most attorneys provide free initial consultations.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 5/26/2011
    Austin Legal Services, PLC
    Austin Legal Services, PLC | Jared Austin
    You'll have to check your bond conditions carefully. Usually when out on bond you are restricted to intra-state travel unless otherwise granted by the court. If that is the case, then you will have to motion the court to travel out of state.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 5/26/2011
    Law Office of Jonathan T. Sarre
    Law Office of Jonathan T. Sarre | Jonathan T. Sarre
    The answer to your question depends on whether the misdemeanor charge is pending, or whether you are on probation or if it's just an old conviction. Generally, you have no restrictions on your ability to travel within the United States. A state can't bar you entry if you have a criminal conviction. However, if you are on release pending trial or on probation, the judge or probation officer can restrict your ability to travel outside of whatever state you currently reside in. Most release agreements and probation conditions have a "not to leave the state without permission" clause. This, of course, has nothing to do with where you may travel to, but a court or P.O. can restrict your ability to go somewhere else.
    Answer Applies to: Oregon
    Replied: 5/26/2011
    Howard W. Collins, Attorney at Law
    Howard W. Collins, Attorney at Law | Howard W. Collins
    Conviction of a misdemeanor does not generally restrict your ability to travel; however you must look at your conditions of probation to see if you need permission to leave the state.
    Answer Applies to: Oregon
    Replied: 5/26/2011
    Law Office of Andrew Subin
    Law Office of Andrew Subin | Andrew Subin
    Yes.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 6/10/2013
    Kelly A. Broadbent, Esq.
    Kelly A. Broadbent, Esq. | Kelly Broadbent
    If you are charges with a misdemeanor in Massachusetts and it is currently pending or you are on probation forte charge, you should check with the court or your probation officer to determine whether you need permission to travel. If the case is disposed of, you can travel within the United States.
    Answer Applies to: Massachusetts
    Replied: 5/26/2011
    Bloom Legal, LLC
    Bloom Legal, LLC | Seth J. Bloom
    Unless you are on some type of probation or house arrest which specifically prohibits interstate travel, you should not have any problems travelling within the US. Generally misdemeanor charges are not communicated between states, therefore outstanding charges from one state should not affect you in another state. That being said, every case is different and the specific charges against you will ultimately determine this - consider speaking to an attorney in your area before leaving your state.
    Answer Applies to: Louisiana
    Replied: 5/26/2011
    Law Offices of Scott G. Hilderman
    Law Offices of Scott G. Hilderman | Scott G. Hilderman
    Yes; depending on your release conditions.
    Answer Applies to: Montana
    Replied: 5/26/2011
    Harris Law Firm
    Harris Law Firm | Jennifer C. Robins
    Generally, you are able to travel within the United States with a misdemeanor charge. You need to make sure, if you are on probation, that there is no prohibition against leaving your home state, or that you have permission from any probation office to leave the state.
    Answer Applies to: Oregon
    Replied: 5/26/2011
    Jules N. Fiani, Attorney at Law
    Jules N. Fiani, Attorney at Law | Jules Fiani
    If you are on bond, one of your bond conditions is that you cannot leave the state of Michigan without the prior approval of the court. So you would have to ask for permission from the court.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 5/26/2011
    Law Office of Eric Sterkenburg
    Law Office of Eric Sterkenburg | Eric Sterkenburg
    Yes if you are not on supervised probation.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 5/26/2011
    Craig W. Elhart, P.C.
    Craig W. Elhart, P.C. | Craig Elhart
    If you have been charged with a crime, your ability to travel would depend on the terms and conditions of your bond.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 5/26/2011
    Beaulier Law Office
    Beaulier Law Office | Maury Beaulier
    Yes. There is no restriction on travel within the United States if you have been convicted of a misdemeanor level charge. There may be restrictions with regard to entry into foreign countries, however, Canada, for example, will often exclude individuals who have certain criminal convictions including a misdemeanor DWI offense.
    Answer Applies to: Minnesota
    Replied: 5/26/2011
    Theodore W. Robinson, P.C.
    Theodore W. Robinson, P.C. | Theodore W. Robinson
    Yes you can - unless it is a sex offense that requires reporting yourself as a sex offender for some reason. Good luck.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 5/26/2011
    Miller & Harrison, LLC
    Miller & Harrison, LLC | David Harrison
    Yes, there should be no problems traveling within the US.
    Answer Applies to: Colorado
    Replied: 5/26/2011
    Goolsby Law Office
    Goolsby Law Office | Richard Goolsby
    You have not provided sufficient facts. If you mean whether or not you could travel while it is pending, then you should consult with a criminal attorney about whether or not there are any travel restrictions or other bond conditions which might have an impact. In addition, no one should travel so far away that it might prevent a court appearance, even if the court approves of the travel. Again, check with an attorney in your community. Good luck!
    Answer Applies to: Georgia
    Replied: 5/26/2011
    Harden Law Offices
    Harden Law Offices | Leonard D. Harden
    Yes the right to travel is a constitutional guarantee. Felons are permitted to travel freely, unless a person is on probation or parole, then there liberty interests are conditional.
    Answer Applies to: New Hampshire
    Replied: 5/26/2011
    Giannini Law Office, PC
    Giannini Law Office, PC | Robert Giannini
    Generally speaking, yes, you can travel within the USA with a misdemeanor charge. However, your bondsman or the court in which you are charged may have requirements that you not leave the state without permission. Ask your attorney to help you determine if there are such requirements in your case.
    Answer Applies to: Georgia
    Replied: 5/26/2011
    Law Offices of John Carney
    Law Offices of John Carney | John Carney
    Unless you have travel restrictions placed on you by the court you are able to travel while out on bail on any charge. When he judge tells you not to leave the jurisdiction pending your trial that is a travel restriction. The court may even order you to surrender your passport.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 5/26/2011
    Law Offices of Phil Hache
    Law Offices of Phil Hache | Phil Hache
    Unless you were ordered by the court to inform them and get approval if you are leaving state lines, there should be no issues. Double check with your attorney who is handling the case to verify there is no such order or implied order in the Court your case is in.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 5/25/2011
    Mercado & Hartung
    Mercado & Hartung | Stephanie Hartung
    The general answer to your question is yes. Depending on your particular case the Judge may have placed certain conditions of release on you, but typically restriction of travel is not one of them. A person subject to the interstate compact is restricted from moving out of state while on probation without permission. If you do not have any criminal history the interstate compact is not applicable to you. For a more specific answer you are welcome to give me call.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 5/25/2011
    The Law Offices of Robert L. Driessen
    The Law Offices of Robert L. Driessen | Robert L. Driessen
    Yes, obviously do not drive if you have a suspended license. There is no restriction to travel for a misdemeanor case. If you are out on bail make sure there are no issues with your bail agent.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 5/25/2011
    Law Office of William S. Smith
    Law Office of William S. Smith | William S. Smith
    If by your question, you mean "Can a defendant who's been charged with a misdemeanor lawfully travel to another state?", the answer is it depends. In Massachusetts, for example, If you are charged with a crime and you have been released by the judge (not held on bail) during the time in which your case is still pending, then it depends on whether the judge at your arraignment placed you on what is called pretrial probation. If you have been formally placed on pretrial probation, you must abide by whatever lawful terms the judge has set (and the only way to challenge any terms would be through legal process). This may indeed include that you are not to travel out of state absent prior permission from the probation department.
    Answer Applies to: Massachusetts
    Replied: 5/25/2011
    Moffitt & Phillips, PLLC
    Moffitt & Phillips, PLLC | Brandon Moffitt
    Yes.
    Answer Applies to: Arkansas
    Replied: 6/10/2013
    Law Office of Jeff Yeh
    Law Office of Jeff Yeh | Jeff Yeh
    Once you are admitted by customs and immigration, there is nothing hindering your movement within the country.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 5/25/2011
    Dennis Roberts, a P.C.
    Dennis Roberts, a P.C. | Dennis Roberts
    yes. you can travel anywhere in the world so long as you return to court on the date scheduled.However, sometimes a judge, when giving you bail, will require you to stay in CA but usually they don't do that. You can do the same even if it is a felony.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 5/25/2011
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