Can you sell a car that you still owe the lender without title and might be up to repossession? 11 Answers as of October 07, 2012

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Bruning & Associates, PC
Bruning & Associates, PC | Kevin Bruning
The answer to your question is: no.
Answer Applies to: Illinois
Replied: 10/7/2012
The Schreiber Law Firm
The Schreiber Law Firm | Jeffrey D. Schreiber
You can sell it, but you will have to sell it for enough to pay off the loan to get the title from the lender.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 10/4/2012
A Fresh Start
A Fresh Start | Dorothy G Bunce
Nothing would stop you from selling the vehicle, but the purchaser would not be able to get the title until the loan was paid. Under those circumstances, the purchaser might not want to proceed, or might want to pay off the loan before handing over any money to you.
Answer Applies to: Nevada
Replied: 10/4/2012
Diefer Law Group, P.C.
Diefer Law Group, P.C. | Abel Fernandez
Well, you could sell the car but you still owe the lender the money and if you sell it and do not pay the loan off the car will be repossessed and you will get sued by the buyer. Also, most buyers will not want to buy a car unless you can give them clean title.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 10/4/2012
Janet A. Lawson Bankruptcy Attorney
Janet A. Lawson Bankruptcy Attorney | Janet Lawson
You cannot clear the title without clearing the loan.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 10/4/2012
    WARM SPRINGS LAW GROUP | Elliott D. Yug
    Anyone who buys a car is going to need the title to register the car. It sounds like you don't have the title to give anyone so the answer is no you can't sell the car. However, if you can pay off the note by selling the car work with the lender and the buyer to make it happen.
    Answer Applies to: Nevada
    Replied: 10/4/2012
    Law Offices of J. L. Haddock, PLLC
    Law Offices of J. L. Haddock, PLLC | Jared L. Haddock
    This just reeks of fraud. The car title is encumbered by a recorded lien from the lienholder. The lien interest in Michigan is shown on the title. In order to legally sell the car, one must sign over the title to the buyer and the transferred title must be properly registered with the Secretary of State. The seller should know that the lien exists, especially if the seller acknowledges that the car may be subject to repossession by said lienholder. If the seller sells the car to a buyer without providing the signed transferable title and thereby attempts to hide the facts that: 1) the title is encumbered by a lien interest and/or 2) that the buyer's right to possession of the car may be in question due to imminent repossession by a valid lien holder, then the question isn't so much whether the seller committed fraud (they did), but rather against whom the fraud was committed - the buyer or the lien holder. If, for instance, the buyer knew of the lien (and the transaction was conducted knowingly in order to hide the vehicle from the lien holder's attempts to repossess it), then both the buyer and the seller are (at least arguably) culpable. So, the quick and simple answer is that I would strongly advise you not to even attempt to sell a car without title for which you know there is a valid lienholder attempting repossession. I hope this information helps
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 10/4/2012
    Steven Harrell, Attorney at Law | Waymon Steven Harrell
    No, your car has a lien. The lienholder's rights cannot be terminated if you attempt to sell the car to a third party, because an auto lien is recorded on the vehicle certificate of title.
    Answer Applies to: Georgia
    Replied: 10/4/2012
    The Law Office of Darren Aronow, PC
    The Law Office of Darren Aronow, PC | Darren Aronow
    No, if you are not the title holder then you can not sell it.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 10/4/2012
    R. Jason de Groot, P.A
    R. Jason de Groot, P.A | R. Jason de Groot
    No, you cannot sell a car without paying the lien, and without having the title.
    Answer Applies to: Florida
    Replied: 10/4/2012
    Law Office of Michael Johnson
    Law Office of Michael Johnson | Michael Johnson
    If you can sell it for more than what it is worth and then do a payoff.
    Answer Applies to: Florida
    Replied: 10/4/2012
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