Can you petition for someone if you have a criminal record? 6 Answers as of January 24, 2011

Can you petition for someone if you have a criminal record?

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Feldman Feldman & Associates, PC
Feldman Feldman & Associates, PC | Lynne Feldman
Yes unless it is one of the crimes covered by the Adam Walsh Act in which case you can still petition but you will be interviewed and the standards of rehabilitation are high and the adjudication process is stringent. See the attached Memo from USCIS.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 1/24/2011
Carlos E. Sandoval, P.A.
Carlos E. Sandoval, P.A. | Carlos Sandoval
Yes, you can petition for someone even if you have a criminal record.
Answer Applies to: Florida
Replied: 1/17/2011
Law Office of Immigration & International Trade Law
Law Office of Immigration & International Trade Law | Linda Liang
Yes, you can. The challenge is your credibility. Hire an attorney to help you to avoid denial.
Answer Applies to: Florida
Replied: 1/14/2011
Pauly P.A.
Pauly P.A. | Clemens W. Pauly
In general there is no question as to any criminal record of the sponsor but you need to contact an immigration attorney as to the details of your situation in order to get better advice.
Answer Applies to: Florida
Replied: 1/14/2011
Law Office of Christine Troy
Law Office of Christine Troy | Christine Troy
That depends on what kind of criminal record you have. For example, any sex offense with a minor prohibits certain kinds of sponsorship.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 1/14/2011
    Nicastro Piscopo, APLC
    Nicastro Piscopo, APLC | Louis M. Piscopo
    Generally, you can petition someone even if you (the petitioner) have a criminal record. However, under the Adam Walsh Act, certain convictions that involve crimes against children or crimes of a sexual nature can prevent you from petitioning someone without proving you would not be a danger to the person you are petitioning. If you believe the crime you were convicted of could fall under the Adam Walsh Act you should have a consultation with an immigration attorney.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 1/14/2011
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