Can you be charged with a felony based only on what the victim says without any physical proof? 14 Answers as of March 19, 2013

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Lawrence Lewis
Lawrence Lewis | Lawrence Lewis, PC
What the victim says may be the only proof, especially in a sex case.
Answer Applies to: Georgia
Replied: 3/19/2013
Michael Breczinski
Michael Breczinski | Michael Breczinski
Yes. The witness, if believed beyond a reasonable doubt, is enough to convict someone. Rape cases are often like this.
Answer Applies to: Michigan
Replied: 3/19/2013
The Law Offices of John J. Carney Esq.
The Law Offices of John J. Carney Esq. | John J. Carney
The complainant's testimony alone is sufficient to get a person arrested if the police believe them. It may also be enough for a conviction if the jury also believes them. Retain a good lawyer to handle the case.
Answer Applies to: New York
Replied: 3/17/2013
Universal Law Group, Inc. | Francis John Cowhig
Yes. The victim's testimony can be the proof.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 3/17/2013
The Law Office of Harry E. Hudson, Jr.
The Law Office of Harry E. Hudson, Jr. | Harry E. Hudson, Jr.
Charged and convicted if jury believes the victim.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 3/15/2013
    Edward  D. Dowling IV Attorney at Law
    Edward D. Dowling IV Attorney at Law | Edward D. Dowling IV
    I would need further information to answer,such as the exact charges and what does the victim say etc however it may be enough to charge you but they would need to prove you guilty beyond a reasonable doubt. You should hire an attorney and disclose all the facts and circumstances.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 3/15/2013
    Law Office of Jeff Yeh
    Law Office of Jeff Yeh | Jeff Yeh
    Absolutely. Why do you think you hear news of innocent people finally getting released from jail after decades of false imprisonment? It is all eye-witness testimony.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 3/15/2013
    Randy M. Lish, Attorney at Law | Randy M. Lish
    The victim's testimony is evidence. It is up to a judge or jury to decide how strong the evidence is, but it is still evidence.
    Answer Applies to: Utah
    Replied: 3/15/2013
    William L. Welch, III Attorney | William L. Welch, III
    Yes, if you might be convicted too on that basis alone. An attorney can assist you with evaluating the prosecution's case, any defenses that you might have, and any plea offer that might be made, so that you can decide whether to plea bargain or go to trial. If you were to be found guilty, then an attorney can assist you with presenting mitigation, allocution, and a recommendation for a more lenient sentence. and a recommendation for a more lenient sentence. Consider seeking a confidential consultation with an experienced criminal defense attorney. Beware that online posts are not confidential. If somehow the prosecution were to find your post, then it might be used in evidence against you.
    Answer Applies to: Maryland
    Replied: 3/15/2013
    Austin Legal Services, PLC
    Austin Legal Services, PLC | Jared Austin
    Depends on what the crime is. Many felonies can stick with the word of the victim alone. It depends on the type of case and how credible the victim comes across. You may have a lot of room to make other arguments however if that is all they have. Consult with an experienced criminal attorney in your area.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 3/15/2013
    William A. Siebert
    William A. Siebert | William A. Siebert
    Yes, you can be charged. Whether you can be convicted is another story.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 3/15/2013
    Beaulier Law Office
    Beaulier Law Office | Maury Beaulier
    Yes. A case can proceed to trial based on circumstantial evidence where, ultimately, a jury decides guilt or innocence.
    Answer Applies to: Minnesota
    Replied: 3/15/2013
    Furlong & Drewniak PLLC
    Furlong & Drewniak PLLC | Thaddeus Furlong, Esq.
    Yes. In Virginia, a witness merely needs only to swear out a complaint with a magistrate or make a police report. Proof issues are for court. There is a low legal standard that all arrests have " probable cause", which a statement from a witness satisfies.
    Answer Applies to: Virginia
    Replied: 3/15/2013
    Musilli Brennan Associates PLLC
    Musilli Brennan Associates PLLC | John F Brennan
    Yes, the testimony is evidence.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 3/15/2013
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