Can someone file a judgment if you owe them money? 13 Answers as of March 25, 2013

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Law Office of D.L. Drain, P.A.
Law Office of D.L. Drain, P.A. | Diane L. Drain
Yes, after they sue you.
Answer Applies to: Arizona
Replied: 3/25/2013
Coulter's Law
Coulter's Law | Coulter K. Richardson
You don't "file a judgment." You file a complaint, then if it goes to trial, and win, you get a judgment.
Answer Applies to: New Jersey
Replied: 3/25/2013
Guardian Law Group PLLC
Guardian Law Group PLLC | C. David Hester
They can file a lawsuit and attempt to obtain a judgment, but they can't just file a judgment, a judgment is the end result of a successful lawsuit.
Answer Applies to: Utah
Replied: 3/21/2013
Reade & Associates
Reade & Associates | R. Christopher Reade
The creditor has to sue you, serve you, give you an opportunity to appear and dispute the allegations and have a finder of fact rule on all claims and defenses. The exception is where the debtor has signed a Confession of Judgment in which the Debtor consent to automatic entry of Judgment by the Creditor.
Answer Applies to: Nevada
Replied: 3/21/2013
Stacy Joel Safion, Esq.
Stacy Joel Safion, Esq. | Stacy Joel Safion
They must sue you first in order to obtain a judgment.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 3/21/2013
    Harris, Yug & Ohlinger
    Harris, Yug & Ohlinger | Roberta Ohlinger-Johnson
    The process is not that simple, but they can certainly file suit resulting in a judgment if you owe them money. If you signed a confession of judgment in Nevada that can be filed as a judgment against you.
    Answer Applies to: Nevada
    Replied: 3/21/2013
    Law Office of John C. Farrell, Jr.
    Law Office of John C. Farrell, Jr. | John C. Farrell, Jr.
    First they would need to file a lawsuit then the judgment comes.
    Answer Applies to: Massachusetts
    Replied: 3/21/2013
    The Law Office of Darren Aronow, PC
    The Law Office of Darren Aronow, PC | Darren Aronow
    No, they have to take you to court and win before they can file a judgment against you.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 3/21/2013
    Edelman, Combs, Latturner & Goodwin, LLC | Daniel A. Edelman
    Judgments are entered by courts, after you are served with a summons and complaint and are given an opportunity for a hearing.
    Answer Applies to: Illinois
    Replied: 3/21/2013
    The Martin Law Group
    The Martin Law Group | Yolvondra Martin-Brown
    Before a judgment can be filed, the person would first have to sue you in court and successfully prevail in court in order to get a judgment. When a person files a lawsuit, the sheriff or marshall usually serves you with a copy of the lawsuit. You then usually have 30 days to respond and if you do then a trial date is set
    Answer Applies to: Georgia
    Replied: 3/21/2013
    Lynn Arends Law Group
    Lynn Arends Law Group | Lynn Arends
    Assuming no signed agreement between the parties to the contrary (such as a Confession of Judgment), a party cannot simply "file a judgment" on unsecured debt they are owed without first bringing an action and then obtaining a judgment (default or otherwise).
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 3/21/2013
    Kevin H Pate
    Kevin H Pate | Kevin H Pate
    If they first bring a legal action against you to recover the funds, and prevail in that action, then yes, there will be a judgment filed. The prevailing party can collect the amount proven to be owed, pre-judgment and post-judgment interest, a reasonable attorney fee, if an attorney is involved, and case costs. The prevailing party can also seek to recover the costs associated with trying to collect on the judgment.
    Answer Applies to: Oklahoma
    Replied: 3/21/2013
    Law Office of Stuart M. Nachbar, P.C.
    Law Office of Stuart M. Nachbar, P.C. | Stuart M. Nachbar
    First they would need to file a complaint against you and obtain the judgement by winning the suit.
    Answer Applies to: New Jersey
    Replied: 3/21/2013
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