Can a quit claim deed be revoked? 4 Answers as of July 16, 2012

My elderly father quit claim deeded over his house to me because he feels that I\\'m the only responsible person out of all my siblings! I happen to be the youngest and now the oldest is very upset with his decision and is now being very vindictive and feels entitled!

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Law Offices of Michael N. Stafford | Michael N. Stafford
Yes a Quitclaim deed can be set aside if certain conditions are shown and proven. It would require a court order to do so.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 7/16/2012
Law Office of Anthony Roach | Anthony Allen Roach
If a deed is properly executed and delivered, it can't be revoked. Both the terms "execution" and "delivery" are legal terms of art. If your father prepared a deed that was not to take effect until he died, then it was not validly delivered. An attorney would need to review the underlying facts and documents to make a specific determination.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 7/16/2012
Law Offices of Jerome M. Applebaum | Jerome M. Applebaum
This is really not landlord/tenant; it is in the overall area of real property. The deed, once recorded, can not be rescinded or revoked by the grantor (person who gives/donates the property). If yopu are the sole grantee of the property, it is yours to do witjh as you wish, unless your father retained some form of interest such as a life estate in the property. But even with that, you can allow any one to live there or not to live there, except for your father in that limited circumstance. To overcome the gift, your brother or other persons would have to prove that some form of fraud or deceit occurred (a difficult proposition to prove) or that your father was not competant to dispose of his property at the time he made the gift/transfer to you. The issue of undue influence could almost be completely ignored as it too is very hard to prove.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 7/16/2012
Law Offices of Stanton Lee Phillips
Law Offices of Stanton Lee Phillips | Stanton Lee Phillips
No. To protect your interests, you may wish to record it, assuming it is in recordable form. You should confer with a lawyer before doing so.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 7/16/2012
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