Can the police get a warrant after a person runs away? 46 Answers as of May 24, 2013

My friend ran from the cops, he got away and ditched the car. Later, the cops found the car. The car was not in his name, but there was an invoice with his name on it from a pawnshop inside the car. There were statements from people saying that he was driving the car that day but they never caught him in it.

Ask a Local Attorney. 100% Anonymous. Free Answers.

Free Case Evaluation by a Local Lawyer: Click here
Law office of Robert D. Scott | Robert Scott
Yes.
Answer Applies to: Maryland
Replied: 5/22/2013
Law & Mediation Office of Jeffrey L. Pollock, Esq.
Law & Mediation Office of Jeffrey L. Pollock, Esq. | Jeffrey Lawrence Pollock
That sounds like enough "probable cause" to interrogate him if nothing else.
Answer Applies to: Pennsylvania
Replied: 9/6/2012
Law Offices of Steven R. Decker
Law Offices of Steven R. Decker | Steven Decker
Of course they can get a warrant for his arrest. If he is stopped by another police department they will hold him for a bond hearing.
Answer Applies to: Illinois
Replied: 9/6/2012
Law Office of Richard Southard
Law Office of Richard Southard | Richard C Southard
Yes. If there are witnesses that saw him as well as other evidence tying him driving, a judge will likely grant the warrant.
Answer Applies to: New York
Replied: 9/6/2012
Law Office of Phillip Weiser
Law Office of Phillip Weiser | Phillip L. Weiser
If the police have enough information to establish he was the driver, they may be able to convice a judge to issue a warrant.
Answer Applies to: Kansas
Replied: 9/6/2012
    Natty Shafer Law
    Natty Shafer Law | Nathaniel Shafer
    Yes, the police could obtain an arrest warrant based on the information in your question.
    Answer Applies to: Utah
    Replied: 9/6/2012
    Law Office of Ronald G. Draper | Ronald G. Draper
    Yes.
    Answer Applies to: Illinois
    Replied: 5/22/2013
    Gregory Casale Attorney at Law
    Gregory Casale Attorney at Law | Gregory Casale
    They can certainly issue the warrant. It does not mean that they can win the case. Hire a lawyer if you receive a summons or warrant.
    Answer Applies to: Massachusetts
    Replied: 9/6/2012
    Law Office of Eric Sterkenburg
    Law Office of Eric Sterkenburg | Eric Sterkenburg
    If the police have evidence to support a reasonable suspicion that a person was involved in a crime they can have a warrant issued for his arrest. In this case they have that evidence.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 9/6/2012
    Edward  D. Dowling IV Attorney at Law
    Edward D. Dowling IV Attorney at Law | Edward D. Dowling IV
    I would need further information to answer better, but as long as they can meet the requirements for obtaining a warrant then yes they can get a warrant.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 9/6/2012
    Stephen D. Hebert, LLC | Stephen Hebert
    Yes. From the factual recitation that you provided, it sounds like the police will (if they havent already) acquire a warrant for your friend?s arrest. As such, you friend should retain a criminal defense attorney as soon as possible.
    Answer Applies to: Louisiana
    Replied: 9/6/2012
    Lawrence Lewis
    Lawrence Lewis | Lawrence Lewis, PC
    If the police have reliable info, they can procure a warrant. Then you friend can play the alibi game - i.e. this is where I really was when you were chasing someone you thought was me.
    Answer Applies to: Georgia
    Replied: 9/6/2012
    Gates' Law, PLLC | Thomas E. Gates
    Yes.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 5/24/2013
    Nelson & Lawless
    Nelson & Lawless | Terry Nelson
    Can the police get a warrant?? Of course, if they can ID you. They did, so yes there will be an arrest warrant. When questioned, arrested or charged with any crime, the proper questions are, can any evidence obtained in a test, search or statement be used against you, can you be convicted, and what can you do? A little free advice: exercise the 5th Amendment right to SHUT UP and do NOT talk to police or anyone about the case except with and through an attorney. No amount of free 'tips and hints' from here or elsewhere are going to effectively help you in your legal defense. If you don't know how to represent yourself effectively against an experienced prosecutor intending to convict, then hire an attorney who does, who will try to get a dismissal, charge reduction, diversion, program, or other decent outcome through motions, plea bargain, or take it to trial if appropriate. If serious about hiring counsel to help in this, and if the charges are in SoCal courts, feel free to contact me. I'll be happy to help fight this and get the best outcome possible, using whatever defenses there may be.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 9/6/2012
    James M. Osak, P.C.
    James M. Osak, P.C. | James M. Osak
    Of course they can . . . most of their warrants are for people they've never seen.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 9/6/2012
    Douglas M. Philpott, P.C. | Peter J. Philpott
    Yes.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 5/22/2013
    Palumbo and Kosofsky
    Palumbo and Kosofsky | Michael Palumbo
    They'll get him so he should retain counsel and turn himself.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 9/3/2012
    Law Office of Mark Bruce
    Law Office of Mark Bruce | Mark Corwin Bruce
    They can get an arrest warrant if they can show a judge probable cause to believe your friend committed the act. Sounds like they've got probable cause.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 9/6/2012
    Klisz Law Office, PLLC
    Klisz Law Office, PLLC | Timothy J. Klisz
    Sure. He needs a good local lawyer ASAP.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 9/6/2012
    Randall M. England, Attorney at Law
    Randall M. England, Attorney at Law | Randall M. England
    You do not mention what crime your friend is supposed to have committed, but to get an arrest warrant their must be probable cause to believe that the defendant committed a crime. Most people naturally avoid committing crimes while the police are watching them, so it is actually quite common to be convicted without the police ever having witnessed the crime itself. It depends on all the evidence taken together.
    Answer Applies to: Missouri
    Replied: 9/6/2012
    Michael Breczinski
    Michael Breczinski | Michael Breczinski
    First they may be able to get a warrant. Second He should make no statement to anyone tht he was driving. This means he should refuse to answer the police questions at all. Third get an attorney before even thinking about the police. Without his confession the police may never be able the convict him. HE HAS THE RIGHT TO REMAIN SILENT.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 9/6/2012
    Law Office of James A Schoenberger
    Law Office of James A Schoenberger | James A Schoenberger
    Yes, if there is probable cause that an individual has committed a crime, an arrest warrant can be obtained.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 9/6/2012
    Law Offices of Eric J. Bell | Eric J. Bell
    Your friend should hire an experienced criminal lawyer to contact the phone and find out if there is a warrant for his arrest. If there is a warrant, the lawyer will arrange for your friend's surrender.
    Answer Applies to: Illinois
    Replied: 9/6/2012
    Law Office of Jeff Yeh
    Law Office of Jeff Yeh | Jeff Yeh
    Of course they can. They have probable cause that your friend is the one who ran.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 9/6/2012
    Expert Bronx Criminal Lawyers
    Expert Bronx Criminal Lawyers | Alexander Sanchez
    Sure. If the police have probable cause to believe that a certain person committed a crime a Judge is likely to approve a warrant for that person's arrest. From the information presented here a Judge would be well within his duties to approve a warrant. Advice: Hire a criminal lawyer to arrange a surrender.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 9/6/2012
    Lee Law Group | Ernest Lee
    YES, if the police have sufficient evidence thy can get a warrant. Proving the case is another matter. He should get an attorney as soon as possible, especially before he speaks to the police.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 9/6/2012
    Law Office of Richard Williams
    Law Office of Richard Williams | Richard Williams
    The police may not need a warrant to search the car. If the car was used in any means of violating the law, especially an attempting to ellude, the police likely took the car into custody and an inventory search followed. Whatever was found in the car could be used as evidence against that person.
    Answer Applies to: Alabama
    Replied: 9/5/2012
    Law Office of Charles J. Block
    Law Office of Charles J. Block | Charles J. Block
    Yes.
    Answer Applies to: New Jersey
    Replied: 5/22/2013
    Fairlie & Lippy, P.C.
    Fairlie & Lippy, P.C. | Steven Fairlie
    They can probably get a warrant under these circumstances, but he may have a great defense at trial. Talk with a good local lawyer.
    Answer Applies to: Pennsylvania
    Replied: 9/5/2012
    William L. Welch, III Attorney | William L. Welch, III
    Perhaps if the police have probable cause that the person fleeing committed a crime, a judge will issue a warrant.
    Answer Applies to: Maryland
    Replied: 9/5/2012
    Miller & Harrison, LLC
    Miller & Harrison, LLC | David Harrison
    It is certainly possible the police will get a warrant fro him, or contact him to have him turn himself in or be issued a summons to court.
    Answer Applies to: Colorado
    Replied: 9/5/2012
    Andersen Law PLLC
    Andersen Law PLLC | Craig Andersen
    The court may issue a warrant or a summons. If there is evidence your friend was driving that is all that is necessary.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 9/5/2012
    Mary W Craig P.C. | Mary W Craig
    Yes, the police can get a warrant based upon the evidence inside the car and the witness statements who claim he was driving the car. The state will have to prove that your friend was driving, but if a policeman can recognize him as the one who was driving, that will be enough.
    Answer Applies to: Alabama
    Replied: 9/5/2012
    Law Office of Kathryn L. Hudson
    Law Office of Kathryn L. Hudson | Kathryn L. Hudson
    With the information you give it is possible for the police to have enough probable cause to get a warrant for the person's arrest, at the very least they may contact the person to come in for questioning. If the person is contacted by the police he should not speak to them without an attorney present.
    Answer Applies to: Arkansas
    Replied: 9/5/2012
    Ryan Maesen PLC | Ryan Maesen
    Yes.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 5/22/2013
    Beaulier Law Office
    Beaulier Law Office | Maury Beaulier
    If there is probable cause to believe a person committed a crime, such as fleeing an officer in a motoro vehicle - which is a felony - a warrant for their arrest may be requested and granted. Your friend better hire legal counsel quickly.
    Answer Applies to: Minnesota
    Replied: 9/5/2012
    Harden Law Offices
    Harden Law Offices | Leonard D. Harden
    Yes a warrant can issue. He still may have a defense. State will need to prove beyond a reasons doubt all elements.
    Answer Applies to: New Hampshire
    Replied: 9/5/2012
    Germaine & Blaszka, P.A.
    Germaine & Blaszka, P.A. | Donald L. Blaszka, Jr.
    Yes the police can get an arrest warrant for your friend.
    Answer Applies to: New Hampshire
    Replied: 9/5/2012
    Law Offices of John Carney
    Law Offices of John Carney | John Carney
    He should retain a good criminal lawyer and not talk to the police no matter what they threaten or promise. The police are trained in manipulating people to make admissions and confessions and most people do tell them what they need to convict them in court. In order to preserve your rights you must demand that all question stop and demand an attorney or the police can continue questioning.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 9/5/2012
    Gary Moore, Attorney at Law
    Gary Moore, Attorney at Law | Gary Moore
    Indirect proof including witness statements are sufficient for a warrant.
    Answer Applies to: New Jersey
    Replied: 9/5/2012
Click to View More Answers:
12 3 4 5 6 7 8 Free Legal QuestionsConnect with a local attorney