Can my wife get alimony if she makes more money than me? How? 7 Answers as of September 08, 2015

How can my wife sue me for alimony when she makes more money? And she left the marriage and me?

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Law Offices of Julie A. Ringquist | Julie A. Ringquist
The higher earning spouse may have to pay the lower earning spouse, if there is a significant difference in their incomes. It does not matter if that person is the husband or the wife or was the one who left the other. Only income matters. You may be eligible to receive spousal support from her.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 9/8/2015
Law Offices of Arlene D. Kock
Law Offices of Arlene D. Kock | Arlene D. Kock
Spousal support is calculated on the actual needs of the parties. The spouse who is the stronger earner is typically the one that would pay spousal support. Who leaves the relationship has no bearing on how support is paid.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 9/8/2015
Grace Law Offices of John F Geraghty Jr.
Grace Law Offices of John F Geraghty Jr. | John F. Geraghty, Jr.
She can ask for anything but that does not mean she will get it.
Answer Applies to: Georgia
Replied: 9/8/2015
Law Office of Robert E McCall | Robert McCall
Judge makes the decision; alimony may be awarded to equalize equitable distribution.
Answer Applies to: Florida
Replied: 9/8/2015
Richard B. Jacobson & Associates, LLC | Richard B. Jacobson
Her leaving the marriage is not usually relevant to the question of an award of alimony (now usually called 'maintenance.') If she is earning more than you, she would have to make an extraordinarily strong case for maintenance (e.g. by showing she is disabled and needs full-time nursing or something equally demanding). It is also possible that she, or her lawyer, is simply copying some form of petition they have seen which lists a number of demands and she might not be serious about that one. Find an experienced matrimonial lawyer. It's almost always worth the investment.
Answer Applies to: Wisconsin
Replied: 9/8/2015
    Law Office of Martin A. Kahan | Martin A. Kahan
    Spousal support is based upon the income and expenses of the parties among other factors such as the length of the marriage. She can request it, but that does not mean she will get it. The fact that she left is of no consequence because CA is a no fault state.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 9/8/2015
    Diane l. Berger | Diane L. Berger
    From the facts presented, it sounds doubtful she would be awarded alimony.
    Answer Applies to: Nebraska
    Replied: 9/8/2015
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