Can my U.S. citizen daughter ask for my permanent residency? 9 Answers as of April 24, 2014

I had an interview scheduled for green card but my husband did not show up. He decided he was not ready to become a step father to my three children. I thought it was all a joke or a nightmare. But I finally realized he was gone for sure. I recently got divorced. My daughter a U.S. citizen will turn 21 years old in June, can she ask for permanent residence for me? Or do I need to go back to my country and file there? My three children depend on my income.

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Law Offices of Svetlana Boukhny
Law Offices of Svetlana Boukhny | Svetlana Boukhny
It depends on how you entered the US. If you entered as a fiance for your ex husband, you will not be able to do it again through your daughter without first leaving the US. If you entered the US lawfully in any other way, you can be petitioned by your daughter.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 4/24/2014
Law Office of Pho Ethan Tran PLLC
Law Office of Pho Ethan Tran PLLC | Pho Ethan Tran
You can remain in the US and apply for adjustment of status on the basis of your daughter's petition as long as you entered the US legally or was inspected prior to entry.
Answer Applies to: Texas
Replied: 4/24/2014
Law Office of Adebola Asekun | Adebola O. Asekun
As long as your initial entry into United States was with a visa, it is important that you do not leave the US but instead, have your daughter file the Form I-130 petition immediately she turns 21 years old. If you are eligible to adjust status in every other respect, you should be ok. However, it is strongly suggested that you hire an experienced attorney to assist you in this regard.
Answer Applies to: New York
Replied: 4/23/2014
Fasidi Legal Group
Fasidi Legal Group | Busayo Fasidi
Your daughter can file a relative petition for you once she turns 21, you will qualify as an immediate relative of a US citizen. As long as you came into the country legally and you are not subject to any grounds of inadmissibility you should have no problems adjusting your status in the US.
Answer Applies to: Texas
Replied: 4/23/2014
Law Offices of Linda Rose Fessler | Linda Fessler
You must go home unless you can convince immigration that he did you wrong by leaving you.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 4/23/2014
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