Can my godfather file an immigration petition for me? 13 Answers as of June 09, 2013

My grandfather is a US citizen can he file for me? I am 18 years old?

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The Law Offices of Kristy Qiu
The Law Offices of Kristy Qiu | Mengjun Qiu
No. Petition through family have to be of first degree of consanguinity or relationship through marriage. In some cases it is allowed, for example if a minor's parents passed away and his/her grandfather became the legal guardian or adoptive parent. In your case your grandfather can petition your parents and you can tag along with them since you're under 21. But hurry up, it's a long process and you only have 3 years left.
Answer Applies to: Florida
Replied: 8/19/2011
Reza Athari & Associates, PLLC
Reza Athari & Associates, PLLC | Reza Athari
Unfortunately no. Not a grandfather nor a godfather.
Answer Applies to: Nevada
Replied: 8/19/2011
Fong & Associates
Fong & Associates | William D. Fong
No, a grandparent is not a qualifying US relative for immigration purposes.
Answer Applies to: Texas
Replied: 8/19/2011
Law Offices of Grinberg and Segal
Law Offices of Grinberg and Segal | Alexander Segal
It is unclear if the person is your godfather or your grandfather. However, neither your godfather nor your grandfather could petition for you to receive an immigrant visa. You need a parent, sibling, adult son/daughter, or spouse to petition for you depending upon their status.
Answer Applies to: New York
Replied: 8/19/2011
Law Office of Nora Rilo
Law Office of Nora Rilo | Nora Rilo
No, at least not directly. He would have to petition his child and you would included as a derivative.
Answer Applies to: Florida
Replied: 8/19/2011
    GK Law Firm
    GK Law Firm | Galorah Keshavarz
    No, he can file for his son or daughter and then your mother/father can file for you.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 8/19/2011
    Law Offices of Caro Kinsella
    Law Offices of Caro Kinsella | Caro Kinsella, Esq.
    No.
    Answer Applies to: Florida
    Replied: 6/9/2013
    Marie Michaud Attorney At Law
    Marie Michaud Attorney At Law | Marie Michaud
    No he can't. American citizens can file for their spouses, their own children, and their siblings. Permanent residents can file for their spouses and unmarried children. Grandfathers can not file for a grandchildren.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 8/18/2011
    World Esquire Law Firm
    World Esquire Law Firm | Aime Katambwe
    No. He cannot, but he can file for your parent (his child) and you will get residency through them. Good luck!
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 8/18/2011
    Christian Schmidt, Attorney at Law
    Christian Schmidt, Attorney at Law | Christian Schmidt
    No, neither your grandfather or godfather can petition you. Only your parents, brothers and sisters, or a spouse can petition you.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 8/18/2011
    Feldman Feldman & Associates, PC
    Feldman Feldman & Associates, PC | Lynne Feldman
    I don't' know your godfather's relationship to you to answer on him. Your grandfather may apply for his children but not grandchildren. Depending on when he became a U.S. citizen though your parent may be a citizen and therefore you may be a citizen. I would have to analyze the specific facts of your case.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 8/18/2011
    Law Office of Christine Troy
    Law Office of Christine Troy | Christine Troy
    That is an interesting question. You need to have a consult with a competent immigration attorney who knows a lot about naturalization law. I am happy to consult with you- my fee is $150. Otherwise take your case to someone else- but sometimes a grandfather being a USC means that the parent is and you can obtain status that way. It is a long shot but you should look into it.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 8/18/2011
    The Law Office of Mark Alan Ivener
    The Law Office of Mark Alan Ivener | Mark Alan Ivener
    No.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 6/9/2013
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