Can a judge sign a warrant in one county and have an address in another? 23 Answers as of June 25, 2013

Can a judge sign a warrant in one county and have an address in another? Is it legal to have two different addresses to be searched in two different counties on one search warrant?

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Fitzpatrick, Mariano, & Santos, PC
Fitzpatrick, Mariano, & Santos, PC | Raymond J. Savoy
An arrest warrant signed by a judge is valid statewide. As long as a search warrant describes the properties to be searched, the warrant is valid. An experienced criminal attorney will assist in obtaining the best outcome possible.
Answer Applies to: Connecticut
Replied: 9/19/2011
Law Office of Jonathan T. Sarre
Law Office of Jonathan T. Sarre | Jonathan T. Sarre
In Oregon, any magistrate can sign a warrant. It doesn't matter if the judge is a judge of that county or some other county or the court of appeals, etc. I'm not sure about the second part of your question. I think an accurate answer would require additional information.
Answer Applies to: Oregon
Replied: 9/14/2011
Thomas J. Tomko Attorney At law
Thomas J. Tomko Attorney At law | Thomas J. Tomko
Thank you for your inquiry Yes, this is possible, however, it should be reviewed by the attorney you hire I hope that this was helpful.
Answer Applies to: Michigan
Replied: 9/14/2011
Law Office of Richard Williams
Law Office of Richard Williams | Richard Williams
Some judicial circuits are comprised on two or more counties. The circuit court judges can sign search warrants in each of the counties in their jurisdiction.
Answer Applies to: Alabama
Replied: 9/14/2011
D T Pham Associates, PLLC
D T Pham Associates, PLLC | Duncan T Pham
Interesting jurisdictional issue.
Answer Applies to: Texas
Replied: 6/25/2013
    Law Office of Eric Sterkenburg
    Law Office of Eric Sterkenburg | Eric Sterkenburg
    A judge may sign a search warrant for two different addresses if the searches are both part of the same investigation.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 9/13/2011
    Law Office of Roianne H. Conner
    Law Office of Roianne H. Conner | Roianne Houlton Conner
    Usually a Judge can sign warrants only in the County in which they are elected. There are exceptions if the judicial circuit takes in more than one county.
    Answer Applies to: Alabama
    Replied: 9/13/2011
    Law Office of Jared Altman
    Law Office of Jared Altman | Jared Altman
    I think so, yes.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 6/25/2013
    Craig W. Elhart, P.C.
    Craig W. Elhart, P.C. | Craig Elhart
    If the warrant is supported by probable cause, it can list two different addresses to be searched.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 9/13/2011
    The Law Office of B. Elaine Jones
    The Law Office of B. Elaine Jones | B. Elaine Jones
    It is possible for a Judge to be able to sign a warrant in one county and have an address in another county because the Court's are divided into Circuits and some Circuit Courts have more than one county in them. For example, the 6th Judicial Circuit has both Pinellas and Pasco counties in it. The second part of your question is a little tougher because the requirements for a warrant to be valid are that there is probable cause, that the place to be searched is to be specifically described, the items that are being searched for should also be described as specifically as possible. So although I have to admit, I have never seen a warrant as you described and I probably would try to attack it in Court, it is potentially possible if the two addresses are some how related in the alleged criminal activity and if both addresses are contained in the warrant and are specifically described. I hope this helped you out.
    Answer Applies to: Florida
    Replied: 9/13/2011
    Michael Breczinski
    Michael Breczinski | Michael Breczinski
    It is possible. A crime can span more than one county and a judge anywhere it occurred can have jurisdiction.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 9/13/2011
    Law Office of Daniel K Martin
    Law Office of Daniel K Martin | Daniel K Martin
    yes it is legal. I had this issue come up and the statute specifically says that a judge can issue a warrant for any place in the state.Crimes that occurred in other counties must be prosecuted in that county or in federal court.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 9/13/2011
    Theodore W. Robinson, P.C.
    Theodore W. Robinson, P.C. | Theodore W. Robinson
    It depends upon a number of things. First, it depends upon how the Warrant was written. Second, if its a superior court judge, then they may have authority over the entire State of New York. Speak to a local lawyer about this question as well. Good luck.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 9/12/2011
    Law Office of Phillip Weiser
    Law Office of Phillip Weiser | Phillip L. Weiser
    This is a very fact specific question. I do not know enough facts to properly answer this scenario. A Federal Judge can issue a search warrant anywhere, while a State court Judge can issue a warrant for only the jurisdiction where he sits, which under some circumstances can encompass several counties.
    Answer Applies to: Kansas
    Replied: 9/12/2011
    Reza Athari & Associates, PLLC | Riana Durrett
    Under Nevada Revised Statute 179.025, a search warrant may be issued by a magistrate of the State of Nevada. Under NRS 179.045, the warrant must be directed to a peace officer in the county where the warrant is to be executed. The warrant must designate the magistrate to whom it is to be returned. Under the Nevada Constitution and Nevada Revised Statutes, it appears that a magistrate can issue an arrest warrant that can be executed in a different county.
    Answer Applies to: Nevada
    Replied: 9/12/2011
    The Law Office of Harry E. Hudson, Jr.
    The Law Office of Harry E. Hudson, Jr. | Harry E. Hudson, Jr.
    A judge's power to act is over the entire state. A judge can order / authorize a search anywhere within the state that the applicant for the warrant demonstrates probable cause to find specified items of evidence regarding a crime and the person(s) who committed it.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 9/12/2011
    Law Office of Brendan M. Kelly
    Law Office of Brendan M. Kelly | Brendan M. Kelly
    Your question required information on the judge that signed the warrant. Courts have limited jurisdiction depending on the nature of the judge, i.e., City, Tribal, State, and Federal. So the answer would have to view who was the judge and what is his/her jurisdiction. Sorry, with the limited information I cannot tell you more.
    Answer Applies to: Nebraska
    Replied: 9/12/2011
    Palumbo and Kosofsky
    Palumbo and Kosofsky | Michael Palumbo
    Yes, totally legal.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 6/25/2013
    Gary Moore, Attorney at Law
    Gary Moore, Attorney at Law | Gary Moore
    Warrants are usually signed by Superior Court judges who have statewide jurisdiction. What level judge signed your warrant?
    Answer Applies to: New Jersey
    Replied: 6/25/2013
    Austin Legal Services, PLC
    Austin Legal Services, PLC | Jared Austin
    There must be probable cause for each location listed on a warrant. As long as there is probable cause, a warrant can have multiple places to search. However, only a judge in the particular county of the location should have authority to issue a warrant absent some exigent and urgent situation. If the warrant is a federal one issued by a federal judge, then it could have multiple counties listed. If in doubt, have an experienced criminal attorney review the warrant.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 9/12/2011
    Law Offices of Jeffery A. Cojocar, PC
    Law Offices of Jeffery A. Cojocar, PC | Jeffery A. Cojocar
    Yes, happens all the time.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 6/25/2013
    Law Offices of John Carney
    Law Offices of John Carney | John Carney
    You have not given me the documents or enough information to give you an opinion. Usually the judge will only have jurisdiction in one county, but your attorney who is familiar with the case can address the question with more information at his disposal.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 9/12/2011
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