Can I turn myself in in a different state than where my warrant is if I'm not able to travel? 33 Answers as of July 11, 2013

I was driving with a suspended license in Dunwoody, GA, got pulled over, then arrested. I'm now in California for work and honestly, flat out forgot about my court date. When I tried to fax a letter to the judge it was denied and the warrant was issued. Can I turn myself in here in California, if I don't have the money for the warrant and travel at this time?

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Law Office of Peter F. Goldscheider
Law Office of Peter F. Goldscheider | Peter Goldscheider
Don't, You might be in custody for a long time. If you want to clear such a minor matter up contact an attorney in GA.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 9/5/2012
Darrell B. Reynolds, P.C. | Darrell B. Reynolds
You can turn yourself in, however, I doubt if they will come get you for what you said you are charged with. If they do not come get you that will not cancel the warrant.
Answer Applies to: Georgia
Replied: 8/20/2012
Michael Breczinski
Michael Breczinski | Michael Breczinski
No you have to go to the other State.
Answer Applies to: Michigan
Replied: 8/20/2012
Larry K. Dunn & Associates | Larry K. Dunn
All States have an extradition agreement which would allow the State to transport someone from another State. The State where the offense was committed may chose to not extradite depending on the nature of the charge and expense to transport the person even if there is an outstanding warrant.
Answer Applies to: Nevada
Replied: 8/20/2012
Law Office of George M. Derieg
Law Office of George M. Derieg | George Derieg
You can try that, but I doubt the state of Georgia would pay for the amount of money to transport you back on account of a traffic ticket. You could possibly be in jail for up to 30 days or longer waiting for Georgia to pick you up.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 8/20/2012
    Law Office of James A Schoenberger
    Law Office of James A Schoenberger | James A Schoenberger
    It is not likely that the GA warrant is extraditable so you would not be able to turn yourself in in CA and get a free trip to GA. And even if it was, it would only be a one-way trip.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 8/20/2012
    Steven Alpers | Steven Alpers
    Georgia probably will not come out and get you. It costs alot of money. You should contact a Georgia attorney to try to handle the case without your appearance.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 8/19/2012
    Mace J. Yampolsky, LTD
    Mace J. Yampolsky, LTD | Mace Yampolsky
    No.
    Answer Applies to: Nevada
    Replied: 5/28/2013
    Law Office of Richard Williams
    Law Office of Richard Williams | Richard Williams
    Assuming that California holds you for the State of Georgia, you would be detained and held, sometime for up- to ten days or more, you could waive extradition and the State of Georgia will come and get you. You will either travel by plane (in handcuffs) back to Georgia or you will ride in the back of a police cruiser back to California, I doubt Georgia would extradite you over driving with license suspended. If you failed to appear and a warrant was issued, you additionally now have an additional suspension of your driving privileges that won't go away till you clear this matter. I suggest that you contact an attorney in Georgia and see if this case can be resolved by plea in abstentia.
    Answer Applies to: Alabama
    Replied: 8/19/2012
    Law Office of James E. Smith
    Law Office of James E. Smith | James Smith
    No. Wait until you have money and get a lawyer in GA.
    Answer Applies to: Nevada
    Replied: 8/19/2012
    Dennis P. Mikko Attorney at Law | Dennis P. Mikko
    You might be able to depending on what the warrant is for. You would then be transfered to the state where the warrant was issued from. Depending on the offense, you may have to travel to the state where the charge is to answer for it.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 8/19/2012
    Law Offices of Mark L. Smith
    Law Offices of Mark L. Smith | Mark L. Smith
    You must appear in Georgia. Contact the Prosecution and see if they will dismiss the charges. If the charges are dismissed so is the warrant.
    Answer Applies to: Rhode Island
    Replied: 8/15/2012
    Myles Hahn III Attorney at Law | Myles Hahn III
    Consider locating a qualified attorney in Dunwoody to assist. Contact a city, county, or other Bar Association in that local area for a recommendation. The case will not ultimately be resolved until you travel there at least once. Do not expect a warm welcome from a judge whose jurisdiction you have intentionally or recklessly avoided.
    Answer Applies to: Illinois
    Replied: 8/19/2012
    Jennifer L. Gottschalk, Esq. | Jennifer Gottschalk
    I would surrender in California and appear before a local magistrate to post bail and not have the warrant continue to be outstanding.
    Answer Applies to: New Jersey
    Replied: 8/15/2012
    Beaulier Law Office
    Beaulier Law Office | Maury Beaulier
    You may, but it is not advisable. You would be hed in jail until a decision can be made by the prosecuting jurisdiction whether to extradite you to that State. In most cases, you can be held in jail for a far longer period than necessary.
    Answer Applies to: Minnesota
    Replied: 8/15/2012
    James M. Osak, P.C.
    James M. Osak, P.C. | James M. Osak
    Highly unlikely! CA doesn't want to spend the money to "ship" you to GA. Contact a local GA attorney.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 8/19/2012
    Leonard A. Kaanta, P.C. | Leonard A. Kaanta
    You can turn yourself and be extradited to the other state.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 8/15/2012
    The Law Office of Harry E. Hudson, Jr.
    The Law Office of Harry E. Hudson, Jr. | Harry E. Hudson, Jr.
    Doubt it unless GA tries to extradite you.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 7/11/2013
    Law Office of Jeff Yeh
    Law Office of Jeff Yeh | Jeff Yeh
    Absolutely not. You think they will spend the money to transport you the otehr state? With most states in dire financial straits, you can forget about it.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 8/15/2012
    Buchholdt Law Offices | Jon M. Buchholdt
    No you cannot turn yourself in to the authorities in California. Or you should not. It is not likely that the Georgia authorities will come after you in California. The problem is that you will not be able to renew your driver's license in California so long as there is a unresolved traffic case in Georgia. And, it is possible that California may move to suspend your driving privileges in California even before renewal time arrives. You should hire a lawyer in Georgia and ask him to set up a hearing at which you have permission to attend telephonically.
    Answer Applies to: Alaska
    Replied: 8/15/2012
    Law Office of Brendan M. Kelly
    Law Office of Brendan M. Kelly | Brendan M. Kelly
    Doubt they will spend time to let you travel back to GA.
    Answer Applies to: Nebraska
    Replied: 7/11/2013
    Michael S. Edwards, Attorney at Law, PLLC | Mike Edwards
    No, it is unlikely that the georgia court will extradite you for a misdemeanor warrant. They usually only extradite for felony cases. You need to either appear personally in Georgia and take care of that one, or you need to hire an attorney in Georgia.
    Answer Applies to: Utah
    Replied: 8/15/2012
    Ferguson & Ferguson
    Ferguson & Ferguson | Randy W. Ferguson
    Most states will not extradite on a traffic offense. California will just hold you until GA says they are not coming. Probably better to do nothing until you can go back to GA on your own.
    Answer Applies to: Alabama
    Replied: 8/15/2012
    Lee Law Group | Ernest Lee
    It would be better for you to hire an attorney who can do everything through the court system. For example, if I, who happens to be a California Attorney, were your attorney I would first get the GA warrant removed either by telephonic hearing or by having my associate counsel in GA execute the task. Then we would work out a please agreement where you pay the fine either in one payment or in payments by mail or online through the Court's payment system, and you are finished.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 7/11/2013
    Law Firm of Martin & Wallentine
    Law Firm of Martin & Wallentine | Jerry Lee Wallentine Jr.
    You can turn yourself and waive extradition. However, they might not actually come get you if they deem it non extraditable, not worth their time. If this happens, make sure you keep all documentation about turning yourself in. You could potentially raise a due process issue later, though it is questionable whether you would prevail on that issue.
    Answer Applies to: Kansas
    Replied: 8/15/2012
    Thomas C. Brandstrader Attorney At Law | Thomas C. Brandstrader
    Only if you want to sit in custody for months while the warrant state decides if it wants to come and get you or not.
    Answer Applies to: Illinois
    Replied: 8/15/2012
    Law Office of Phillip Weiser
    Law Office of Phillip Weiser | Phillip L. Weiser
    GA probably would not extradite you for this warrant, so if you surrendered to CA, they may be able to keep you in jail for an unknown period while they check with GA to see if they wanted to come and get you. You would most likely spend a few days to a few weeks in jail while this process was done. Your best bet would be to hire an attorney where the ticket was issued (GA) and have him negotiate the ticket on your behalf.
    Answer Applies to: Kansas
    Replied: 8/15/2012
    Law Office of Joe Dane
    Law Office of Joe Dane | Joe Dane
    The only thing California will do is hold you and notify Georgia they have you. They likely won't extradite you over a minor matter, but it also won't clear the warrant. Only the court in Georgia can recall the warrant and handle the case. You may be able to have an attorney in Georgia appear on your behalf without you having to travel back there. Contact a couple of local attorneys in Georgia to discuss this. You need a good criminal defense attorney. I'd strongly suggest you find someone who focuses on criminal law and who routinely practices in the court where this case will be heard.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 8/15/2012
    Law Office of Gregory Crain | Gregory Crain
    You could but they probably won't extradite. Retain attorney in Dunwoody to represent you.
    Answer Applies to: Arkansas
    Replied: 8/15/2012
    Rothstein Law PLLC
    Rothstein Law PLLC | Eric Rothstein
    It is unlikely that GA will pay to extradite you from CA for that charge. Even if they would, why would you want to spend a few weeks in jail before they came to pick you up?
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 8/15/2012
    T.K. Byrne | Timothy K. Byrne
    Yes, however you ay sit i jail in California for several days until Dunwooody decides they do not want you. Nevertheless, the warrant will remain active and you should expect to be arrersted on the next traffic stop Contact a Georgia attorney and get this resolved.
    Answer Applies to: Mississippi
    Replied: 8/15/2012
    Germaine & Blaszka, P.A.
    Germaine & Blaszka, P.A. | Donald L. Blaszka, Jr.
    Generally you must turn yourself in on an arrest warrant in the state that it was issued. You should contact a local attorney to assist you.
    Answer Applies to: New Hampshire
    Replied: 8/15/2012
    Tannehill, Carmean & McKenzie, PLLC | Jay P. Carmean
    While that is certainly an option, there is no guarantee how long it would take for you to be transported to Georgia. You would spend all of that time in jail. My advice would be to contact a criminal defense attorney in Georgia.
    Answer Applies to: Mississippi
    Replied: 8/15/2012
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