Can I transfer the property I received as a beneficiary of a trust directly to my own trust in California? 8 Answers as of September 24, 2012

I inherited the property as an individual. I'm not sure whether it can go directly to my trust in the grant deed process or whether it has to go to me as an individual.

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Law Offices of Michael N. Stafford | Michael N. Stafford
Generally it will go to you first and then you can transfer it to your trust. Some trustees will transfer it to your trust directly.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 9/24/2012
Irsfeld, Irsfeld & Younger LLP | Norman H. Green
Probably you can assign your interest in the trust into your own trust.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 9/24/2012
Danville Law Group | Scott Jordan
It depends on what the original trust states. If it allows the trustee to transfer to another trust, yes it can go directly to your trust. If not, it will have to go to you first and then you can transfer it to your trust.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 9/24/2012
Law Office Of Victor Waid
Law Office Of Victor Waid | Victor Waid
Yes, you can take the property directly into your own trust. If you inherited the property already, or about to, be sure you obtain an appraisal at the actual time of inheritance prior to transfer into trust so you will know what the basis is going into the trust and can file the notice of no change in value at the time of transfer into your trust. You can also take title at the time of inheritance from the estate by grant deed and then transfer into the trust. I would suggest you consult a CPA/Tax lawyer re the tax consequence of receipt either way.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 9/24/2012
Neal M. Rimer, Esquire
Neal M. Rimer, Esquire | Neal M. Rimer
The property should go to the named beneficiary, you. There may be exemptions from a reassessment as a result of the transfer or the property will be appraised at fair market value for tax purposes. After that transaction, you can transfer the property into your trust, which is an exempt transfer. It is best to do transfers one step at a time.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 9/24/2012
    Law Offices of R. Christine Brown | R. Christine Brown
    If you inherited real property it can be transferred to you as an individual but then you can immediately execute a quitclaim deed or a trust transfer deed and transfer the real property to your trust.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 9/24/2012
    The Law Offices of Ralph W. Flick, P.S.
    The Law Offices of Ralph W. Flick, P.S. | Ralph W. Flick
    If you inherited the property directly and you are the only beneficiary of the California trust, you should be able to quit claim the property from you to yourself as trustee of the California trust.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 9/24/2012
    Meissner, Joseph & Palley, Inc.
    Meissner, Joseph & Palley, Inc. | John Palley
    It's best to do by deed to you and then separate deed to your trust. That way you can file your parent-child exclusion (if there is one). Just a cleaner chain of title in my opinion.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 9/24/2012
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