Can I sue someone who, ran a credit check on me and was telling people what’s on there? 15 Answers as of June 12, 2013

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The Lucky Law Firm, PLC
The Lucky Law Firm, PLC | Robert Morrison Lucky
Did you give this person permission to run your credit? If you did not, then there are some severe privacy violations here. If you did, then it is not likely you gave this person permission to discuss it with anyone else. You may wish to contact you local DA or the Attorney General's office to find out what your next move would be.
Answer Applies to: Louisiana
Replied: 9/29/2012
Law Office of Melvin Franke | Melvin Franke
Yes.
Answer Applies to: Missouri
Replied: 5/22/2013
Lombardi Law Firm
Lombardi Law Firm | Steve Lombardi
Yes.
Answer Applies to: Iowa
Replied: 6/12/2013
Paul Whitfield and Associates P.A.
Paul Whitfield and Associates P.A. | Paul L. Whitfield
I suppose you can. What is your damage other than hurt feelings folks have the notion that if someone makes a mistake or does something wrong they can enjoy a trip to the ban k. doesn't work that way. You have to show damages, real damages.
Answer Applies to: North Carolina
Replied: 9/28/2012
Douglas M. Philpott, P.C. | Peter J. Philpott
Yes if you did not give authorization.
Answer Applies to: Michigan
Replied: 9/28/2012
    Hirsch, Closson, McMillan & Schroeder, APLC
    Hirsch, Closson, McMillan & Schroeder, APLC | Paul Schroeder
    Possibly there would be a claim for invasion of privacy, libel or slander. You might also be able to get an injunction to get them to stop. However, I would need to know more facts in order to provide a more definitive answer. Also, have you been harmed by this?
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 9/26/2012
    R. D. Kelly Law Firm, P.L.L.C.
    R. D. Kelly Law Firm, P.L.L.C. | Robert Kelly
    There are causes of action for invasion of privacy and public disclosure of private information.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 9/26/2012
    Frank Law Group, P.C.
    Frank Law Group, P.C. | Brett E. Rosenthal
    In a word, yes because that is a violation to your right to privacy unless you executed something that provided that person the right to disseminate the information in your credit report.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 9/26/2012
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