Can I sue my landlord if my son was injured on his property? 66 Answers as of May 29, 2013

My 3 year old son was injured on my landlord's property. Due to a deteriorated front porch my son tripped over a loose board, fell and suffered 3 broken ribs and had cuts and bruises on his face and knees legs. I complained to the landlord prior and had code inforcers come inspect the house. He got a certified letter from them and now he is retaliating against me for calling inspectors trying to illegally kick me out. He cut the water off and put a lock on the basement so it can't be turned on. Then turned around and cut off my lights. I want to sue him for my son's medical bills which in total are $43,486.10 plus my food went bad. I spent $470 in grocery plus I want my rent paid back in full. I verbally told him I was going to sue him after my son's accident and asked him if we can settle out of court for $1500 so I can just move into a new place. He refuses to pay anything now I want to sue him for $5000 in small claims court. Do I have a case? He has no renters insurance also I don't think he is supposed to even be renting out rooming houses. How do I do it where can I find a lawyer willing to take my case and if we win they take they payment? I have no money upfront.

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MatthewR. Schutz, Esq | Matthew R. Schutz
You have a cause of action for your son's injuries, constructive eviction, the food.
Answer Applies to: New Jersey
Replied: 8/14/2012
Adler Law Group, LLC
Adler Law Group, LLC | Lawrence Adler
You do have a case if you can prove that the landlord knew of should have known of the defective condition.

Most attorneys who take such a personal injury case (as do we) will do so on a contingency fee basis, agreeing to get paid out of the settlement or judgment.
Answer Applies to: Connecticut
Replied: 8/14/2012
Lombardi Law Firm
Lombardi Law Firm | Steve Lombardi
In Iowa you would have a case if the condition is considered to be a defect; meaning it is in violation of a code standard or is considered by a fact finder to be unreasonably dangerous. If you reported the landlord to the City Housing Commission and he/she retaliated that is a second violation under the State of Iowa's Housing Code (Uniform Residential Landlord and Tenant Act). With as much as you have in medical bills I'd strongly suggest you see an attorney who is familiar with the act. The landlord may have insurance that covers your family's damages.
Answer Applies to: Iowa
Replied: 8/14/2012
Casler Law Offices PLLC | Carl Casler
You need a personal injury attorney and they normally take cases on contingency. In addition to liability for your son's injuries, your landlord also has liability to you for shutting off your water, electricity and effectively evicting you ("constructive eviction"), which under the facts you stated, appears to be retaliatory and he will have the burden of proving otherwise (under the Arizona statute, the foregoing conduct is presumed to be retaliatory). Call three personal injury attorneys; select the one with whom you are most comfortable and is genuinely interested in your case.
Answer Applies to: Arizona
Replied: 8/14/2012
Dennis P. Mikko Attorney at Law | Dennis P. Mikko
You should speak with an attorney that handles personal injury cases.

Most lawyers working in this area will work on a contingent fee basis. That is, there is no attorney fee unless there is a recovery.

If the landlord has insurance, it is possible that the insurance company will work toward a settlement compensating your son for his injuries.

You may also be able to seek damages against the landlord for his illegal actions against you as a tenant. Again, before doing anything, speak with an attorney.
Answer Applies to: Michigan
Replied: 8/14/2012
    Victor Varga | Victor Varga
    Not sure...did you and your son have knowledge of the issue with the porch? From your email, it sounds like you did.

    Therefore, it would be very difficult to win a case against the LL, as you were on notice of the defect, still allowed your son to use the deck.
    Answer Applies to: Maryland
    Replied: 8/14/2012
    Sultan Law Office | Gregory Sultan
    From what you have said, you have a valid claim. For what and how much you nee to talk to a lawyer. I think it is worth your time to call a few lawyers in the County you live in and find someone who will take a personal injury claim on a contingency basis.

    You should be able to find some one who won't charge you for the first meeting. You may also have a claim for the landlord cutting off your water and taking action due to you calling for an inspection.
    Answer Applies to: Illinois
    Replied: 8/14/2012
    The Law Office of Stephen R. Chesley, LLC
    The Law Office of Stephen R. Chesley, LLC | Stephen R. Chesley
    A tenant may sue a landlord for his negligent acts. Under the facts that were presented you and your son can bring a lawsuit for his injuries. You should contact an attorney to take action.

    As far as his further retalitory actions you may bring him to landlord tenant court because he cannot shut heat or water.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 8/14/2012
    Sedin Begakis & Bish | Mindy Bish
    Yes you can sue your landlord under a theory of premise liability. You may also have a retaliatory eviction against your landlord.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 8/14/2012
    Stephens Gourley & Bywater | David A. Stephens
    Your case and your son's case are separate. Your son has a case if the landlord was negligent.

    You can probably find a lawyer to take your son's case on a contingency. You may have a case for harassment which you could litigate in small claims court or through an attorney.
    Answer Applies to: Nevada
    Replied: 8/14/2012
    Law Office of Melvin Franke | Melvin Franke
    Hire an experienced attorney like myself. Do not sue in small claims because the judgment is worthless. When in circuit court you can force him to sell his properties.
    Answer Applies to: Missouri
    Replied: 8/14/2012
    James M. Osak, P.C.
    James M. Osak, P.C. | James M. Osak
    YES you can sue . . . but you'll have to PROVE your case.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 8/14/2012
    Andrew T. Velonis, P.C.
    Andrew T. Velonis, P.C. | Andrew Velonis
    All property owners are responsible for keeping their property in reasonably safe condition.

    According to your statement, the landlord knew of the hazard and failed to take steps to correct it, even though he had time to do so, so he should be held legally liable for injuries that could foreseeably result.

    $43,486.10 for broken ribs? That does not make any sense. With that magnitude of medical bills, why would you be willing to settle for $1,500?

    Or file a small claims action for $5,000? Most personal injury lawyers will offer a free in-person consultation. You need to sit down and talk with someone to sort out these issues.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 8/14/2012
    Jeffre Crandall, Attorney at Law | Jeffre Crandall
    "Constructive Eviction." Move out, then sue. Add the "Duty" clause to your Complaint. See your nearest attorney.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 8/14/2012
    Richard J. Keyes Attorney at Law | Richard J. Keyes
    You have a personal injury action on behalf of your son and you also do not have quiet enjoyment of the premises. Contact an attorney for a personal injury action against the landlord and also talk to the attorney about the landlord attempting to do "self-help" in trying to evict you from the premises. Most attorneys take personal injury actions on contingency fees where you do not need to pay any money up front.
    Answer Applies to: Missouri
    Replied: 8/14/2012
    Havens & Lichtenberg PLLC
    Havens & Lichtenberg PLLC | Michael Lichtenberg
    Hello, I do civil litigation, in particular, personal injury cases. From the information you provided, it seems that you have a case against your landlord for the whole amount of medical bills and other damages, including pain and suffering of your child.

    My partner Jeremy Havens specializes in real estate and landlord-tenant law. He just told me: "This person has a rock solid case. Depending on our ability to prove it, and the location and circumstances, the landlord may even be subject to triple damages and possibly have to refund all of the rent the tenant ever paid."
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 8/14/2012
    Law Office of Ronald Arthur Lowry
    Law Office of Ronald Arthur Lowry | Ronald Arthur Lowry
    If what you said is true you have a bigger case than $5,000. Get a personal injury lawyer immediately.
    Answer Applies to: Georgia
    Replied: 8/14/2012
    Law Offices of Michael N. Stafford | Michael N. Stafford
    You have multiple causes of action against your Landlord. I strongly suggest you see an attorney before suing in small claims court or settling with your landlord.

    It appears from what you have stated that he could be responsible for all of your sons medical bills plus other damages.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 8/14/2012
    The Murphy Law Firm
    The Murphy Law Firm | Candace M Murphy
    You should contact an attorney immediately. The attorney will be able to review your lease, as well as the records of your son's injuries to determine what claim you may have and also to assist you in calculating the damages you sustained overall.
    Answer Applies to: Texas
    Replied: 8/14/2012
    The Law Offices of Charles Pernice | Chas Pernice
    The owner of this property, and anyone responsible for its dangerous condition, can be sued for negligence under California law.

    If the landlord and/or owner is retaliating against you, you may be able to sue for those acts as well, especially if eviction proceedings are instituted against you.

    Cutting off the water etc. is a form of constructive eviction which may give rise to other remedies for you.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 8/14/2012
    Law Offices of Ronald A. Steinberg & Associates | Ronald A. Steinberg, BA, MA, JD
    Absolutely. When you rent residential property, there is a guarantee that the property is "fit for the use intended," and that the "common areas are reasonably safe."

    So, if you complained about the defect but the landlord did not repair it, there was a breach of the lease, which is a basis for a claim for premises liability. The landlord is obligated for all of the proximately caused injuries and damages.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 8/14/2012
    Gary Moore, Attorney at Law
    Gary Moore, Attorney at Law | Gary Moore
    You have a lawsuit, but the money must be placed with the county surrogate until the child is eighteen.
    Answer Applies to: New Jersey
    Replied: 8/14/2012
    Dwyer, Black & Lyle, LLP
    Dwyer, Black & Lyle, LLP | Kevin Habberfield
    Go get an attorney immediately. You've got both bodily injury and landlord tenant issues that need addressed but, it's more complicated than can be answered in an email. Good luck.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 8/14/2012
    Douglas M. Philpott, P.C. | Peter J. Philpott
    Yes you can.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 5/29/2013
    Leonard A. Kaanta, P.C. | Leonard A. Kaanta
    You can sue him for the injury and violating the Michigan anti lockout law. You need an attorney.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 8/14/2012
    LEATHERS LAW FIRM
    LEATHERS LAW FIRM | A. Wade Leathers, Sr.
    Yes.
    Answer Applies to: Alabama
    Replied: 5/29/2013
    Timiney Law Firm
    Timiney Law Firm | Leigh Anne Timiney
    You have many issues going on here. Yes, you can bring a claim against your landlord for your son's injuries and your landlord's property insurance should handle this claim. In addition to that, in the state of Arizona it is illegal for a landlord to turn off utilities such as water and electricity to a rental property. I would suggest you contact an attorney who specializes in landlord tenant issues and see if you can obtain a free consultation. Many attorneys will offer free first time consults. Good luck to you.
    Answer Applies to: Arizona
    Replied: 8/14/2012
    Brett Pedersen & Associates
    Brett Pedersen & Associates | Brett Alexander Pedersen
    Yes you can.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 5/29/2013
    Jules D'Alessandro | Jules D'Alessandro
    Yes you can and should sue the landlord for your son's injury. It doesn't matter if he has renter's insurance the general liability on the policy will pay for the claim. This would be a contingency case so the lawyer will get paid a percentage of the money he/she gets for your son. With medical bills in excess of $40,000.00 your sons case is worth far more than $5,000.00 and you should never settle for that amount. The eviction for calling code enforcement is retaliation and violates the RI Residential Landlord Tenant Act. These are complicated issues and you do need to get a lawyer.
    Answer Applies to: Rhode Island
    Replied: 8/14/2012
    Goncalves Law Office | Humberta Goncalves-Babbitt
    You need to contact an attorney as soon as possible. You may have 2 issues here, one is the possible personal injury case for your son's injuries and the other is the landlord-tenant matter.

    On the personal injury case there it is customary for attorneys to take the case on a contingency basis, which means the attorney will receive a portion of the judgment received.

    You can certainly contact me for a free confidential consultation, or contact the Rhode Island Bar Association's pro bono program and be assigned an attorney who has agreed to take some cases on a pro bono basis.
    Answer Applies to: Rhode Island
    Replied: 8/14/2012
    Universal Law Group, Inc. | Francis John Cowhig
    From what you have written, it seems that you may have a case for damages based on a number of violations your landlord has committed.

    If your landlord had knowledge of the loose board and the dangerous condition it caused prior to your son's fall, you may have a claim for personal injuries.

    You may also be able to sue your landlord for cutting the water off, putting a lock on the basement so it can't be turned on and cutting off your lights.

    All these acts are illegal and he can be found liable.

    I strongly suggest that you contact an attorney for a face-to-face consultation and give him/her all of the facts surrounding your situation. He/she would then be in a better position to analyze you case and advise you of your options. Good Luck.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 8/14/2012
    Law Office of Jared Altman
    Law Office of Jared Altman | Jared Altman
    Sounds like a GREAT case to me. You'll have no trouble interesting a personal injury attorney in the case.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 8/14/2012
    R. D. Kelly Law Firm, P.L.L.C.
    R. D. Kelly Law Firm, P.L.L.C. | Robert Kelly
    The area of law addressing that type of situation is called "Premises Liability".
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 8/14/2012
    Downriver Injury and Auto Law | Michael Heilmann
    The case has merit. A landlord has a statutory duty to maintain the property in reasonable repair. The injury must be sufficient to have a lawyer. Good Luck.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 8/14/2012
    Law Offices of Frances Headley | Frances Headley
    You should consult a landlord tenant attorney or legal aid society which handles landlord tenant matters.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 8/14/2012
    Andrew D. Campbell, Attorney at Law | Andrew D. Campbell
    Based on the details of your situation, you absolutely have several causes of action against your landlord.

    The first of which being an action for retaliatory eviction. A landlord may not evict a tenant for taking action such as you did in calling and inspector.

    This breach would be a complete defense to his action for eviction, would entitle you to terminate the lease without penalty if you wanted, and likely entitle you to damages in the amount of your relocation costs. Secondly if your landlord was aware of the condition of the porch, that it was dangerous, and did nothing, you have an action against him for your son's injuries that resulted from the dangerous condition.

    Finally, it is against the law in Michigan for a landlord to cut off utility services such as water and electric to a property inhabited by tenant. This is a serious breach of the lease for which you are likely entitled to terminate the lease without penalty, and entitling you to monetary compensation for your costs of relocating.

    While normally this would not be the type of case that I would take on a contingency basis, the nature of the claim for injuries to your son makes this a good candidate for a contingent fee arrangement in which I would be willing to accept my payment as a portion of the total amount of the judgment recovered.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 8/14/2012
    James T. Weiner & Associates, P.C.
    James T. Weiner & Associates, P.C. | James T. Weiner
    I recommend you contact an attorney immediately!

    His actions in locking you out by denying services like water and electricity are a potential penalty of $200 PER DAY ...plus he is violating the Michigan Consumer Protection Act. So you should be able to collect attorneys fees.

    His actions in retaliatory termination are even more illegal and may be cause for you to live there without the need of paying rent.

    As to the damages for the accident, was the area under your control or his was it a common area? Whose responsibility is it to repair? Did you have renters insurance? The Landlord should have general liability insurance to cover it.

    BTW, rooming houses are a different matter and are regulated more like hotels so they have even stricter standards than mere single family or multi-family residential rentals. Are you sure this is a rooming house?
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 8/14/2012
    Law Office of Gregory Crain | Gregory Crain
    Yes, but no lawyer is going to take this case without the payment of legal fees.
    Answer Applies to: Arkansas
    Replied: 8/14/2012
    DEAN T. JENNINGS, P.C.
    DEAN T. JENNINGS, P.C. | Dean T Jennings
    Yes.
    Answer Applies to: Iowa
    Replied: 5/29/2013
    Palumbo and Kosofsky
    Palumbo and Kosofsky | Michael Palumbo
    First off, what he is doing is criminal lockout and it is also a crime to withhold power and heat so call the police on that. Yes, you have a lawsuit due to the negligence of the property owner.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 8/14/2012
    Lee Law Group | Ernest Lee
    Friend: It sounds like you may be able to sue the landlord (LL) civilly for your son's injuries, and for retaliatory eviction or the attempt thereof. If you can get an attorney to take your case on 'A CONTINGENCY FEE' you will not be required to pay any upfront fee.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 8/13/2012
    Gonzalez & Cartwright, P.A.
    Gonzalez & Cartwright, P.A. | Charles Cartwright
    Yes, you have a case. If he does not have insurance, it will be difficult t recover. You should hire an attorney who can perform an asset search on the defendant to see if recovery is possible.
    Answer Applies to: Florida
    Replied: 8/14/2012
    AyerHoffman, LLP
    AyerHoffman, LLP | David C. Ayer
    Based on the facts you have stated it appears you have a strong case against your landlord for your son's injuries, violations of health codes, and several counts of retaliation. You should not settle for just $5000.00. You should have no trouble finding an attorney take this case on contingency basis, meaning your attorney is paid out of the award you get from the case. If the place is illegal to rent, he may face criminal charges as well.
    Answer Applies to: Massachusetts
    Replied: 8/14/2012
    Pingelton Law Firm | Dan Pingelton
    Look for an attorney who will handle this on a contingency fee basis. Based on what you said, you may have a case. Don't bother with small claims court and that kind of thing. Get a lawyer.
    Answer Applies to: Missouri
    Replied: 8/14/2012
    Law Offices Charles Garganese, Jr. | Charles Graganese, Jr.
    Yes. You can bring a claim against the property owner on behalf of your minor child. Most attorneys will take your case on a contingent fee basis. That means that you will not be required to pay anything up front.
    Answer Applies to: Rhode Island
    Replied: 8/14/2012
    Craig Kelley & Faultless
    Craig Kelley & Faultless | David W. Craig
    It sounds like you have a case. Your son cannot, under Indiana law, be held responsible for his injuries due to his age.

    If the landlord had a dangerous condition on his property then he can be legally responsible for your sons medical bills, his pain, suffering and any other reasonable damage that resulted from his fall.

    Most injury attorneys don't charge a fee unless and until they get you a recovery. The problem may be collecting what you are owed if the landlord does not have insurance.

    Most landlords carry insurance especially if they have a mortgage on the property.
    Answer Applies to: Indiana
    Replied: 8/14/2012
    Chalat Hatten & Koupal PC
    Chalat Hatten & Koupal PC | Linda Chalat
    You should contact Metro Volunteer Lawyers, this is a service provided by the Denver Bar Association. MVL recruits and coordinates volunteer lawyers to perform free and low-cost legal services for poor and near-poor persons who live and work in Adams, Broomfield, Arapahoe, Denver, Elbert, Douglas, Jefferson, and Denver Counties.
    Answer Applies to: Colorado
    Replied: 8/14/2012
    Mosley, Engelman & Jones, LLP
    Mosley, Engelman & Jones, LLP | Britany M. Engelman
    Yes, you can pursue your son's claim against your landlord based on a theory of premises liability. You should contact a law firm, such as mine, that specializes in premises liability cases and is willing to take your case on a contingency fee basis.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 8/14/2012
    Erik E. Highberg, PLLC | ERIK E HIGHBERG
    You have case against him for premises liability. I'm not sure why you sons medical bills are so high, but if the costs are reasonable and necessary and related to the accident this case is worth more than $1,500.

    I would be willing to assist you on a percentage basis (as would most attorneys). Call me if you have questions.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 8/14/2012
    Merdes & Merdes, P.C.
    Merdes & Merdes, P.C. | Ward Merdes
    Yes, you can sue your landlord for your son's injuries - and you will win if the landlord was "negligent" - acted unreasonably under the circumstances.

    Your son is entitled to lost wages (likely none as he is a minor), medical bills, and pain/suffering and disability.

    You can also bring statutory claims under the Landlord/Tenant act. Call a lawyer ASAP. Keep your eye on your and your son's Statutes of Limitations or risk losing valuable legal rights. Get moving right now.
    Answer Applies to: Alaska
    Replied: 8/14/2012
    Gates' Law, PLLC | Thomas E. Gates
    I lack sufficient information to answer your questions fully. You state several claims concerning several issues, they are not one and the same.

    You indicated that your son's medical bill was $43,486.10, if so why would you settle for $1,500?

    Your landlord has violated RCW 59.18, "Landlord-Tenant Act." Once a complaint has been made to a overseeing body, such as the Code Enforcers, if the complaint is found valid and notice given to the landlord, he cannot take any adverse action against you for 90 days. Further, he may not cut-off utilities.

    You have cause of action against your landlord for these violations and can seek damages. Concerning your son, you may have a cause of action to seek payment of the medical expenses.

    There are questions here on your part,
    1) was the loose board one of the reasons you contacted the Code Enforcer,
    2) was written notice given to the landlord concerning the loose board, and
    3) was it obvious that the board was loose?

    I recommend you contact an attorney.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 8/14/2012
    Lapin Law Offices
    Lapin Law Offices | Jeffrey Lapin
    Yes you can sue your landlord for your son's fall, injuries and damages. You may also have a claim against him for trying to force you out of the apartment.

    I cannot answer whether you would be successful for either of these cases based on the information you provided. I would need a lot more details to be able to answer. You cannot sue your landlord for more than $3,500.00 in Small Claims Court.

    In addition, if your son's medical expenses are $43,486.10 you should be suing for a lot more money. There are many ways you can find an attorney. You can look on the internet, phonebook, TV advertisement or ask your friends and family.

    Most personal injury attorneys takes cases on a contingency fee basis, which means they take a percentage of the money they collect on your case. Most do not require you to pay them anything out of your own pocket; they will advance all costs and expenses.

    You should definitely talk to an attorney. Most offer a free consultation so you can learn a lot more about your rights as well as payment options.
    Answer Applies to: Nebraska
    Replied: 8/14/2012
    Ford, Howard & Cornett, P.C. | Bradley Cornett
    Based on the facts as you present them, you may well have a claim against your landlord (on behalf of your son for the injury and on behalf on yourself for the other improper behavior).

    If you are not in our area, you should find a reputable attorney with whom to consult. Most attorneys will provide a free initial consultation without obligation.
    Answer Applies to: Alabama
    Replied: 8/14/2012
    Law Offices of David M. Blain
    Law Offices of David M. Blain | David Blain
    My response assumes as true the facts you have provided. Also, it is difficult to provide a complete analysis without all of the facts. A telephone conversation would be more appropriate.

    As to your question, you have described two different potential lawsuits against your landlord. The first lawsuit would be for your son on behalf of the injuries he suffered as a result of falling on the porch.

    In an action for personal injuries the injured party is allowed to recover damages. Damages are compensatory and punitive. Compensatory damages are designed to restore the injured person to the position they would have been in had they not suffered the injury.

    Compensatory damages include payment for past and future medical expenses, past and future lost wages, as well as pain and suffering. If your son incurred $40,000+ in medical expenses then you should hire an attorney and pursue this for more than $5,000.

    Punitive damages are intended to punish the defendant for his oppressive, fraudulent or malicious behavior. My office handles personal injury lawsuits and we do so on an entirely contingent fee agreement. This means my office would pay the costs for the lawsuit and would only be reimbursed these costs and paid our fee if we were successful in obtaining a settlement or judgment on your sons behalf.

    If we lose you pay nothing. As to the second potential lawsuit that you have described, there are many permissible reasons a landlord can evict a tenant. However, there are also many legally impermissible reasons a landlord may evict a tenant.

    Retaliatory action against the tenant for the tenant's reporting of unsafe conditions would be considered retaliatory and is impermissible.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 8/14/2012
    Doug Rothschild Injury Lawyers
    Doug Rothschild Injury Lawyers | Doug Rothschild
    You might have a good personal injury case for your son, and a landlord tenant matter. You should contact a personal injury lawyer in your area.

    The good ones will (1) Not charge you for an initial consultation; (2) Not charge you by the hour for their services; and (3) Take your case on a contingency fee basis, meaning they only take a fee (get paid) on any settlement or verdict they obtain for you.

    Example: If a personal injury lawyer settles the case for $100, they will generally take $33 or 1/3. Often, the attorneys fee is less when a minor is involved.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 8/14/2012
    LAW OFFICE OF JEFFREY Z DWORIN
    LAW OFFICE OF JEFFREY Z DWORIN | JEFFREY Z DWORIN
    Assuming everything you say is accurate you have a very strong case against the landlord for lockout/wrongful eviction and violation of the safe rental laws. Your son also has a negligence case unless there is a waiver or assumption of risk in the lease (probably not enforceable even if there is).
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 8/14/2012
    Broad Law Firm, LLC
    Broad Law Firm, LLC | Donald K. Broad
    If your son truly has $43,000+ in medical expenses, you should be able to find a personal injury attorney in your area that would take the case on a contingency. The problem is that those types of cases usually take a long time to finalize, and it sounds as if you need to move out quickly.
    Answer Applies to: Indiana
    Replied: 8/10/2012
    Salladay Law Office | Lance Salladay
    From the sounds of it, you may have a very good claim against your landlord that may include a claim for punitive damages. Call the state bar for a referral of attorneys.
    Answer Applies to: Idaho
    Replied: 8/14/2012
    Mike Yeksavich | Mike Yeksavich
    There may well be a suit. I suggest a claim against the landlord's insurance to start off. You might make an appointment to discuss this in greater detail.
    Answer Applies to: Oklahoma
    Replied: 8/14/2012
    The Davies Law Firm, P.A.
    The Davies Law Firm, P.A. | Robert F. Davies, Esq.
    What you are describing is really going to get this landlord smacked by the Judge. No, he is not allowed to do any of that.
    Answer Applies to: New Jersey
    Replied: 8/14/2012
    Rothstein Law PLLC
    Rothstein Law PLLC | Eric Rothstein
    What County is this? Your son has a claim for pain and suffering and you may have one for constructive eviction. Why do you say he has no insurance?
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 8/14/2012
    Bulman Law Associates PLLC Injury Law Firm
    Bulman Law Associates PLLC Injury Law Firm | Thomas Bulman
    Go to small claims court in the county courthouse.
    Answer Applies to: Montana
    Replied: 8/14/2012
    Joel H. Schwartz, P.C.
    Joel H. Schwartz, P.C. | Steven A. Schwartz
    I am sorry to hear about your son's slip and fall. There very well may be a claim for him, but more detailed questions must be asked to determine this. Did you take pictures of the defective steps? Our office works on a contingency fee agreement which means no money has to be paid up front. We would only be paid if we got your son a recovery. Feel free to call for a free consultation to see what your son may be entitled to under the law.
    Answer Applies to: Massachusetts
    Replied: 8/14/2012
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