Can I sue for slander if someone created a website about me? 39 Answers as of June 02, 2013

I found out that an ex boyfriend had created a website about me with horrific lies and personal information all posted up. I have no idea how to report this site and it actually has caused me some strife at work. I had to explain to my boss some of the accusations that were on there. Is it possible to sue him for slander?

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Lacy Fields, Attorney at Law, LLC
Lacy Fields, Attorney at Law, LLC | Lacy Fields
You should immediately preserve the evidence (print off the pages, use power point "screen shot" functions, etc). Then talk to an attorney. You would have a defamation case, although it would be libel (written) as opposed to slander (oral). There may also be some criminal acts being committed and it may be possible to get the authorities involved.
Answer Applies to: Missouri
Replied: 3/5/2012
Law Office of Jared Altman
Law Office of Jared Altman | Jared Altman
Yes.
Answer Applies to: New York
Replied: 6/2/2013
DEAN T. JENNINGS, P.C.
DEAN T. JENNINGS, P.C. | Dean T Jennings
Yes.
Answer Applies to: Iowa
Replied: 6/2/2013
Toivonen Law Office | John Toivonen
Defamation is the communication of information to a third party that is false and likely to harm the reputation of a person. Libel is written defamation. Slander is verbal defamation. Because this defamation is written it is libel. But truth is a complete defense to defamation. What this means is that if there any truth to what the person posted and he can prove that it is true, then you cannot win a defamation lawsuit.
Answer Applies to: Michigan
Replied: 2/27/2012
Law Offices of Richard Copeland, LLC
Law Offices of Richard Copeland, LLC | Richard Copeland
Yes. This is becoming a more frequent problem, and there are legal remedies to help you.
Answer Applies to: Colorado
Replied: 2/27/2012
    Ezim Law Firm | Dean Esposito
    You can file a personal injury lawsuit for defamation of character and request a restraining order be issued for him to remove the website and/or not post anything on it. He may have violated some criminal statutes as well.
    Answer Applies to: Louisiana
    Replied: 2/27/2012
    Law Offices of Tom Patton
    Law Offices of Tom Patton | Thomas C. Patton
    Yes, it is possible. It is also possible to seek and injunction, which would require him to take the site down.
    Answer Applies to: Oregon
    Replied: 2/25/2012
    Kelaher Law Offices, P.A.
    Kelaher Law Offices, P.A. | James P Kelaher
    Yes, it is, but you'd need to find an attorney who handles those types of cases.
    Answer Applies to: Florida
    Replied: 2/25/2012
    The Law Firm of Shawn M. Murray
    The Law Firm of Shawn M. Murray | Shawn M. Murray
    Yes, you can likely file a successful lawsuit against the ex-boyfriend regarding anything he said about you that was damaging and untrue. Your legal action would generally be for defamation of character. There are two types of defamation: one is slander which involves a one-to-one communication and the other is libel which involves publication of the false information, including electronic publication such as on a website. Thus, you may have an action for both slander and libel. However, truth is an absolute defense to an action for defamation, and it will be your burden to prove which allegations are false. Consequently, it will put your entire life on trial.
    Answer Applies to: Louisiana
    Replied: 2/27/2012
    The Lucky Law Firm, PLC
    The Lucky Law Firm, PLC | Robert Morrison Lucky
    Yes, you are able to sue for slander or libel for the words spoken or written which are untrue and cause harm. You have to prove that the words are indeed are untrue and that they have caused compensatory damages.
    Answer Applies to: Louisiana
    Replied: 2/24/2012
    Paul Whitfield and Associates P.A.
    Paul Whitfield and Associates P.A. | Paul L. Whitfield
    You can sue for libel and slander. Slander is oral. Libel is written but you need to prove damages other than hurt feelings. You need a doctor, counselor or somebody to say you were hurt. You need to prove you lost your job or suffered from some real damages.
    Answer Applies to: North Carolina
    Replied: 2/24/2012
    Law Firm of Martin & Wallentine
    Law Firm of Martin & Wallentine | Richard Martin
    A claim for slander (in this case, libel) may lie if the offensive statement is false. However, many jurisdictions now require you to prove actual damages in the form of economic loss in order to win your case.
    Answer Applies to: Kansas
    Replied: 2/24/2012
    Atterbury, Kammer & Haag | Eric J. Haag
    If someone made knowingly false statements about you that harmed your reputation in the community, then you would have a defamation claim against the person that made the false statements.
    Answer Applies to: Wisconsin
    Replied: 2/24/2012
    Tenge Law Firm, LLC
    Tenge Law Firm, LLC | J. Todd Tenge
    Yes. You would need to hire an injury attorney experienced in these types of cases. But to prevail, you will need to prove the elements of the claim, which are: (1) he made a false statement/publication; (2) he knew it to be false when he made/published it; and (3) it was published; and (4) it has caused you harm or damage. Keep in mind, there won't be any insurance coverage because it is an intentional act (vs. negligence) and as such, you will need to figure out if he has any money or assets from which to collect any judgment you might receive. Since your goal is probably more to have the thing taken down, you could, as an alternative, file an injunction. An injunction asks the judge (in a hurry up fashion) to shut this down because you are likely (or have already) suffered irreparable harm. You don't get money damages but you get the thing taken down ASAP. Finally, you could sue for an injunction and money damages in certain circumstances.
    Answer Applies to: Colorado
    Replied: 2/24/2012
    Lapin Law Offices
    Lapin Law Offices | Jeffrey Lapin
    In general you can sue someone for posting "horrific lies" about you on a website. What you describe is actually "libel" not "slander. Libel involves a written statement while slander is oral. Both libel and slander are forms of "defamation." To win a case involving defamation the first thing you must prove is that the statements are false. Second, for a statement to be defamatory it must be an assertion of a fact, not opinion. The statement must have some standard to measure to determine whether it is true or false to be defamatory. For example, if someone said you were a "not a very nice person" that would not be defamatory as it would it would be opinion rather than a fact as it could not be proven true or false; each person would have their own opinion about what it means to be a "nice person." There are some statements automatically considered defamatory if they relate to: (1) the commission of a crime involving moral turpitude; (2) an infectious disease; (3) unfitness to perform the duties of an office or employment; (4) prejudice one in his or her profession or trade; or (5) tend to disinherit you. Again, statements involving these items must be false for you to be able to win a defamation case. There are some other elements and requirements, which are not listed as they are dependent on the facts of the case, you must be able to prove to win a defamation case. You should contact your ex-boyfriend, in writing, asking him to shut the site down and retract all false statements. If he refuses, you can try contacting either the host of his website or his Internet Service Provider (ISP) and request that his site be shut down. You should be able to find the contact information for the website host and/or by doing a "WHOIS" search. There are a number of sites in which you can do a "WHOIS" search. If the site is on Facebook or a similar type site, you should contact the site itself and request your ex-boyfriend's website/page be shut down. If your ex-boyfriend will not voluntarily shut down the site or you cannot otherwise get it shut down, your only option would be is to file a lawsuit asking for a permanent injunction to be the site taken down. An "injunction" is simply a court order requiring someone to do or stop doing something. In addition, if you lose your job, have sustained emotional distress or have other damages, you can also sue for these items. You might also have breach of privacy claims under Nebraska law based on the "personal information" your ex-boyfriend posted. The types of privacy claims include, but are not limited to: (1) trespassing or intruding upon a person's solitude or (2) placing a person before the public in a false light. There are a number of defenses to these privacy claims. You do not state what is actually posted so I cannot comment on whether you have any privacy claims as Nebraska only permits claims for certain types of privacy violations. There are other possible claims you might have.
    Answer Applies to: Nebraska
    Replied: 2/24/2012
    Chalat Hatten & Koupal PC
    Chalat Hatten & Koupal PC | Linda Chalat
    Yes, you may have a case against your ex-boyfriend.
    Answer Applies to: Colorado
    Replied: 2/24/2012
    Law Office of Ronald Arthur Lowry
    Law Office of Ronald Arthur Lowry | Ronald Arthur Lowry
    Yes. There is an attorney in Atlanta who specializes in such cases.
    Answer Applies to: Georgia
    Replied: 6/2/2013
    Bulman Law Associates PLLC Injury Law Firm
    Bulman Law Associates PLLC Injury Law Firm | Thomas Bulman
    Yes it is. It matters is he has significant assets or resources that might be used to pay a money judgment.
    Answer Applies to: Montana
    Replied: 2/24/2012
    Attorney & Counselor at Law
    Attorney & Counselor at Law | John Hugger
    Yes, any untruthful statement published about you that causes you monetary damages is actionable.
    Answer Applies to: Colorado
    Replied: 2/24/2012
    Joseph T. Barberi, P.C.
    Joseph T. Barberi, P.C. | Geoffrey K. Rettig
    In Michigan you may pursue claims for Defamation, which includes libel and/or slander. You may also consider an action for Intentional Infliction of Emotional Distress or Invasion of Privacy. Certain damages may be presumed, depending upon what has been published or posted.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 2/24/2012
    VANJOHNSON LAW FIRM, LLC
    VANJOHNSON LAW FIRM, LLC | Anthony Overton Van Johnson
    You can definitely sue for libel/defamation of character, if what was said about you is false.
    Answer Applies to: Georgia
    Replied: 2/24/2012
    Dwyer, Black & Lyle, LLP
    Dwyer, Black & Lyle, LLP | Kevin Habberfield
    It's possible. In the scheme of defamation the case would actually be a liable (written) case, not slander (verbal). There are nuances in defamation cases both from an elements of the claim and damages standpoint.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 2/24/2012
    The Olawale Law Firm | Emmanuel Olawale
    Yes, you may sue for libel and slander based on the publication.
    Answer Applies to: Ohio
    Replied: 2/24/2012
    Steven Harrell, Attorney at Law | Waymon Steven Harrell
    You can sue this man for libel. The publication of the information on the web site allows you to sue for libel. Slander is based on spoken words, libel is based on publication.
    Answer Applies to: Georgia
    Replied: 2/24/2012
    Bruce Plesser | Bruce Plesser
    You have a cause of action for the deformation.
    Answer Applies to: Florida
    Replied: 2/24/2012
    Lombardi Law Firm
    Lombardi Law Firm | Steve Lombardi
    Yes, you can sue him. Send him a letter demanding he take the site down. Contact the website manager and demand it be taken down.
    Answer Applies to: Iowa
    Replied: 2/24/2012
    Law Office of Mark J. Leonardo
    Law Office of Mark J. Leonardo | Mark Leonardo
    Yes. If the statements are known by him to be false and he published them, you can sue. You can also seek court relief to have the website shut down, but that could be expensive. Perhaps the threat of a lawsuit from an attorney may get him to remove it.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 2/24/2012
    Michael Anthony Wing, P.C.
    Michael Anthony Wing, P.C. | Michael Anthony Wing
    That would be Libel when it is written. You must demand that he post a retraction in the same manner that he made the false statement(s). Send it certified, and keep a copy. If he has assets of insurance coverage, call me, and we can discuss your details. If he has no real assets, file in small claims.
    Answer Applies to: Alabama
    Replied: 2/24/2012
    Law Office of Patrick E. Donovan, PLLC
    Law Office of Patrick E. Donovan, PLLC | Patrick E. Donovan
    Yes. You have an actionable claim if the statements were false and made with the intent to cause you harm. Damages are always hard to prove in slander cases, but if they posed a problem at work, that is a good start.
    Answer Applies to: New Hampshire
    Replied: 2/24/2012
    Attorney at Law | Ernest Krause
    Have the website taken down, of course. Slander, and similar causes of action (lawsuits) are complex and hard to prove. And you don't seem to have any provable damages. Google with search terms describing this kind of situation. Maybe you could get an injunction where a judge tells him not to do it again. You need to spend money for all that.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 2/24/2012
    Klisz Law Office, PLLC
    Klisz Law Office, PLLC | Timothy J. Klisz
    It certainly is possible. I would need to examine the content, as well as establish whether he is collectible.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 2/24/2012
    R. D. Kelly Law Firm, P.L.L.C.
    R. D. Kelly Law Firm, P.L.L.C. | Robert Kelly
    Your statement indicates you probably have a legitimate cause of action at civil law for defamation of character and libel. You should probably retain an attorney to help you with that. You can read relevant cases on the MRSC website.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 2/24/2012
    THE LAMPEL FIRM
    THE LAMPEL FIRM | ERIC LAMPEL
    Yes, this is actionable slander.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 2/24/2012
    The Carlile Law Firm, LLP
    The Carlile Law Firm, LLP | D. Scott Carlile
    Yes and intentional infliction of emotional distress.
    Answer Applies to: Texas
    Replied: 2/24/2012
    David F. Stoddard
    David F. Stoddard | David F. Stoddard
    Yes it is. You would need some evidence that he is the one who created the site. Also, if he has no significant assets, you might get a judgment against him that you would never collect.
    Answer Applies to: South Carolina
    Replied: 2/24/2012
    The Law Office of Harry E. Hudson, Jr.
    The Law Office of Harry E. Hudson, Jr. | Harry E. Hudson, Jr.
    Maybe and maybe not. You should consult an attorney who handles this type of case [consultations are usually free] and discuss the case. Bring a screen shot with you to the interview.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 2/24/2012
    Magnuson Lowell P.S.
    Magnuson Lowell P.S. | Richard S. Lowell
    Yes. But it can be a time-consuming and potentially expensive process (unless he backs off and shuts it down after hearing from you or your attorney).
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 2/24/2012
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