Can I sue the factory for breech of contract due to reducing our wage? 6 Answers as of December 06, 2013

I was employed through a temporary agency working at a plastic factory as an assembler. There was more than one temporary agency at the location, when word got out that one agency made more than another, and more than the employees that worked for the actual company, the human resources department had a talk with the agency that made more money. They notified the higher payed employees that there pay would be reduced, the temporary agency I worked for said don't worry they can't do it, but they did it anyway. Can I sue for breech of contract

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Peters Law, PLLC
Peters Law, PLLC | Mark T. Peters, Sr.
No. You can quit and find a new job.
Answer Applies to: Idaho
Replied: 12/6/2013
KEYL ADR Services, LLC | Mark D. Keyl
No, unless you had a written contract setting those wages. Likely the only contract was between the company and temp agency.
Answer Applies to: Mississippi
Replied: 12/5/2013
WILLIAM L SANDERS, ATTORNEY AT LAW | William L. Sanders
Yes, you may sue your employer for this, but 1) you will not win that suit, and 2) you will likely lose your job. In GA, an employer may raise, lower, or discontinue (fire) wages at any time, for any reason, or no reason at all, so long as the reason is not Race, Age, Sex,National Origin, Religion, Handicap. If this is not acceptable to you, you may quit the job, but you have no legal remedy in Georgia. Georgia recognizes the doctrine of employment at will. Employment at will means that in the absence of a written contract of employment for a defined duration, an employer can change the terms of the job or terminate an employee for good cause, bad cause, a mistaken cause, or no cause at all, so long as it is not an illegal cause. Illegal causes are limited in Georgia to the EEOC/Discrimination grounds: Race, Age, Sex,National Origin, Religion, Handicap If it is not on that list, it is not protected in GA.
Answer Applies to: Georgia
Replied: 12/5/2013
Law Offices of Linda Rose Fessler | Linda Fessler
File a complaint with the Department of Labor.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 12/5/2013
Barton Barton & Plotkin
Barton Barton & Plotkin | Maurice Ross
No. You have no right to be paid the same wages today as you were spud yesterday. Your employer can legally reduce pay at any time absent a written agreement to the contrary. This is why unions are do important. Unions have written agreements with companies that lock in pay.
Answer Applies to: New York
Replied: 12/5/2013
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