Can I sue a company for racial discrimination if I no longer work there? 12 Answers as of March 08, 2013

They have hundreds of employees but very very few minorities and none of them are in upper management.

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Cepkinian-Cinar Law Grouop | Jibit Cinar
If you have concrete evidence that you were wrongfully terminated by your employer due to violation of an established California public policy (e.g. racial discrimination), then yes, you may have a case against your employer regardless of whether or not you still work there. However, if your only basis for the racial discrimination is that there is nobody of minority in upper management, you may have a difficult case to prove.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 3/8/2013
Musilli Brennan Associates PLLC
Musilli Brennan Associates PLLC | John F Brennan
Perhaps, however it would be a extremely difficult case to win.
Answer Applies to: Michigan
Replied: 3/7/2013
workerscomp.tv
workerscomp.tv | Terrence A. Valko
You can pursue a employment law Title VII case if you were discriminated against by firing or not advancing if part of the reason involved your race, national origin, gender or religious affiliation. These cases are fact-specific and not statistical, so you will need to articulate who did what to you, when, and with which witnesses. Call for a sit-down with your employment lawyer who, if he takes the case, will do so on a contingent fee or ask the court for the defendant to pay attorney fees under federal statute.
Answer Applies to: Pennsylvania
Replied: 3/7/2013
S. Joseph Schramm | Joseph Schramm
Theoretically, you could sue a former employer for discrimination against you. However, the success of the suit would depend a great deal on the facts of the case and in this situation you would need to have more supporting facts than you have given. You would also have to show racial discrimination against yourself under those facts. You also have a short timeline to file a complaint with the EEOC, the Pennsylvania Human Relations Commission or both as an initial requirement to prosecuting a claim for racial discrimination measured from the time you knew or should have been aware of the discriminatory act against you.
Answer Applies to: Pennsylvania
Replied: 3/7/2013
Alena Shautsova
Alena Shautsova | Alena Shautsova
Maybe. It depends where you worked, how long ago and what happened to you.
Answer Applies to: New York
Replied: 3/7/2013
    Fox & Fox, S.C. | Richard F. Rice
    It depends on the specific information and the dates of your former employment and termination.
    Answer Applies to: Wisconsin
    Replied: 3/6/2013
    Kram & Wooster, P.S. | Richard H. Wooster
    You may have a case depending on the rest of the facts. If you learn of an opening that you think you are qualified for, you should submit an application. Keep notes and records of discriminatory actions and the recruitment of non-minorities and passing over equal or more qualified minorities. You can file a claim with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, but youd be better of meeting with an attorney first.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 3/6/2013
    Law Office of Jack Longert, LLC | Jack Longert
    Yes you can if you are within the relevant filing deadline for the Wisconsin Equal Rights Division and/or Federal Equal Opportunity Commission.
    Answer Applies to: Wisconsin
    Replied: 3/6/2013
    Law Office of Patricia S. Rose | Patricia S. Rose
    Yes, under most circumstances
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 3/6/2013
    License Advocates Law Group LLP | Christine McCall
    You can sue for adverse employment events based on unlawful discrimination that were done to you while you were employees or if you were an applicant denied employment. You cannot successfully sue based on your views that racial minorities or a specific racial minority is under-represented in certain occupational classifications at a former employer.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 3/6/2013
    WILLIAM L SANDERS, ATTORNEY AT LAW | William L. Sanders
    Yes, but you have a limited window to do so. It is based on time from the event, not from time of separation. You would have the burden to prove discrimination. You have to get permission from EEOC before you file this suit.
    Answer Applies to: Georgia
    Replied: 3/6/2013
    Peters Law, PLLC
    Peters Law, PLLC | Mark T. Peters, Sr.
    You can, but you will have a number of things to overcome. First, did you file a complaint with the EEOC or the Idaho Human Rights Commission within 6 months of the discrimination happening? You will need to get a right to sue letter. Second, were you adversely affected by the discrimination? Did you suffer a job loss, failure to be promoted, etc? Third, you will have to prove that the adverse action was a result of the discrimination. Just because there are not a lot of minorities is not in and of itself proof of discrimination.
    Answer Applies to: Idaho
    Replied: 3/6/2013
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