Can I sue the apartment complex if I slipped on ice in the parking lot? How? 13 Answers as of June 28, 2015

I slipped on ice at an apartment complex on the way to my car. The entire parking lot is ice. Can I sue the complex?

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The Law Offices of Russell Gregory, P.C.
The Law Offices of Russell Gregory, P.C. | Russell Gregory
Possibly. You'll probably get a lot of responses about Michigan's open and obvious danger defense (if the danger was open and obvious, you can't sue), and ice typically falls into this category. Plus there are other cases regarding snow and ice that are unfavorable to injury claimants. Still, each case is worth examining on its own facts, as there are exceptions (for example, if you had no other route choice but over the iced area). So, it's worth discussing the details, to see if something can be pursued.
Answer Applies to: Michigan
Replied: 6/28/2015
Law Offices of Richard M. Levy P.C.
Law Offices of Richard M. Levy P.C. | Richard M. Levy
Yes, but there are potential liability issues. It's important that you retain an experienced lawyer.
Answer Applies to: New York
Replied: 6/26/2015
Law Offices of Ronald A. Steinberg & Associates | Ronald A. Steinberg, BA, MA, JD
In Michigan, it is possible, but very difficult.
Answer Applies to: Michigan
Replied: 6/26/2015
Richard B. Jacobson & Associates, LLC | Richard B. Jacobson
Probably. The question o answer is multiple: what duty the owner owed to you, and did he breach it, and was the breach the direct cause of injuries? Consult a personal injury to be sure. Some municipalities have ordinances which cover this kind of question.
Answer Applies to: Wisconsin
Replied: 6/26/2015
James E. Hasser, Jr. P.C.
James E. Hasser, Jr. P.C. | Jim Hasser
It depends on whether the complex had a duty to remove the ice. Check your lease. There may be local ordinances as well. Consider consulting an experienced injury lawyer familiar with premises liability cases. Good luck.
Answer Applies to: Alabama
Replied: 6/26/2015
    Andrew T. Velonis, P.C.
    Andrew T. Velonis, P.C. | Andrew Velonis
    In order to make a claim against a property owner (including stores, parking lots, apartments, etc) the injured party has to show that the owner knew or should have known of the hazard, had an opportunity to correct it, and failed to take action. So, you would have to prove that the owner of the parking lot knew of the ice, had time to salt or sand it, and did not do so.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 6/26/2015
    Bulman Law Associates PLLC Injury Law Firm
    Bulman Law Associates PLLC Injury Law Firm | Thomas Bulman
    Take a picture. In Montana, jurors are quick to forgive a landowner for snow related conditions. Also, the defendant is allowed to argue you knew the footing was icy so you were careless or clumsy. That can lead to a zero or greatly reduced recovery.
    Answer Applies to: Montana
    Replied: 6/26/2015
    Law Office of Lisa Hurtado McDonnell | Lisa Hurtado McDonnell
    You have show negligence. Did you report it? Were you injured? Did you go to the doctor?
    Answer Applies to: Utah
    Replied: 6/26/2015
    Law Offices of George H. Shers | George H. Shers
    You do not give us enough information to make a guess. Did you suffer injuries worth suing? See a local personal injury attorney and tell them the entire set of facts. There is no charge to speak to the attorney.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 6/26/2015
    Adler Law Group, LLC
    Adler Law Group, LLC | Lawrence Adler
    You have a claim if you can show that they knew or should have known that there was a nice present and failed to act reasonably to timely remove it.
    Answer Applies to: Connecticut
    Replied: 6/25/2015
    Law Ofices of Edwin K. Niles | Edwin K. Niles
    What did they do wrong? You'd be better off suing mother nature for depositing the ice.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 6/25/2015
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