Can I stop my chapter 7 bankruptcy? How? 13 Answers as of June 03, 2015

I have too many assets that I do not want to be liquidated and I do not want to, or simply cannot, fulfill many of the requirements of my bankruptcy? Can I stop it? I filed on my own, but will a lawyer be able to stop it for me? Thank you.

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Stephens Gourley & Bywater | David A. Stephens
You will have to file a motion to dismiss.
Answer Applies to: Nevada
Replied: 6/1/2015
A Fresh Start
A Fresh Start | Dorothy G Bunce
It is extremely unlikely that a bankruptcy judge will agree to order a dismissal of your chapter 7 case, especially as you have assets that the trustee can sell to pay your creditors. Filing a Chapter 7 is like stepping off a cliff and filling without an attorney is like doing this with a blindfold on. My best suggestion is to consider whether you can convert to a Chapter 13 to avoid losing the property. But I would not be interested in working with your case, sorry! Too late for me to offer you any meaningful help. e.
Answer Applies to: Nevada
Replied: 6/3/2015
Ronald K. Nims LLC | Ronald K. Nims
There is no mechanism for stopping a Ch 7. You have the right to convert to a Ch 13, which would protect your assets. Or you can try just skipping the creditors meeting, usually that will result in your case being dismissed.
Answer Applies to: Ohio
Replied: 6/3/2015
The Law Office of Darren Aronow, PC
The Law Office of Darren Aronow, PC | Darren Aronow
You can try to file a voluntary dismissal but once you file your assets up for seizure by the trustee, or you can convert to a chapter 13 where the trustees can not take your assets.
Answer Applies to: New York
Replied: 6/3/2015
Janet A. Lawson Bankruptcy Attorney
Janet A. Lawson Bankruptcy Attorney | Janet Lawson
Your only option is try and get into Ch13. There is no getting out of a ch7 where there are assets to liquidate. You may find a lawyer at NACBA.org.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 6/3/2015
    Law Offices of Joseph A. Mannis
    Law Offices of Joseph A. Mannis | Todd Mannis
    Since you have assets, its going to be somewhat more difficult to stop this train. I suggest that you speak with a bankruptcy attorney quickly. The longer you wait, the harder it will be.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 6/3/2015
    Scott Goldstein | Scott Goldstein
    If you have assets, A trustee will not allow you to dismiss your case. He has a statutory obligation to administer your assets for the benefit of your creditors. In addition, if you refuse to cooperate, he can moved or do you to turn over nonexempt property. Failure to cooperate could mean a contempt order or worse. You could convert the case to a chapter 13 if you have income to allow it. This is why you should never ever file bankruptcy by yourself.
    Answer Applies to: New Jersey
    Replied: 6/3/2015
    Deborah F Bowinski, Attorney & Counselor at Law | Debby Bowinski
    You just learned a very good, but probably very hard lesson about why hiring lawyers to help one with legal issues and proceedings is a really good idea. You should consult with an experienced bankruptcy lawyer immediately. It is unlikely that they will be able to get your case dismissed - there is no "right" to dismiss a chapter 7 case once it has been filed. An experienced and knowledgeable lawyer might well be able to convert your case to a chapter 13 where you might not have to lose your assets. Additionally, an experienced lawyer might find some applicable exemptions to claim and apply that you may have missed. Don't delay.
    Answer Applies to: Colorado
    Replied: 6/3/2015
    Danville Law Group | Scott Jordan
    Probably not. But, you could convert to a Chapter 13.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 6/3/2015
    Tokarska Law Center
    Tokarska Law Center | Kathryn U. Tokarska
    Depends what stage you are at in the case or whether the court will allow a dismissal. Don't propound the crazy decision of moving forward without representation thinking you can skate by on your own wits by not getting one either. I admit it may be difficult to get an attorney involved at this stage as many attorneys don't want to step into existing cases. We're partly paid to do representation yes but the other part, the part that can be most valuable in certain situations is evaluating a potential cases, doing perfectly legal upfront BK planning and determining whether to file or seek other alternatives and if to file then WHEN as timing can make a big difference. Once you've pressed the BK button when you shouldn't have you're on the defensive attempting damage control. Perhaps if you can't get a dismissal, in your particular situation you can convert to a chapter 13. Get an attorney as soon as possible.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 6/3/2015
    Law Office of Barry R. Levine | Barry R. Levine, Esq.
    You need to explore filing a motion to dismiss or a motion to convert to chapter 13. Of course, your issue begs the question of why you didn't consult with counsel prior to filing and more significantly, why if you had too many assets, you filed in the first place.
    Answer Applies to: Massachusetts
    Replied: 6/3/2015
    GARCIA & GONZALES, P.C.
    GARCIA & GONZALES, P.C. | Richard N. Gonzales
    It's hard to say. It's like asking a doctor about an ex-ray via email without the doctor being able to look at the ex-ray. Pay and meet with an experienced BK lawyer. He can review your entire file with the BK court online, from his or her office, while meeting with you. The sooner the better!
    Answer Applies to: Colorado
    Replied: 6/3/2015
    Richard B. Jacobson & Associates, LLC | Richard B. Jacobson
    The general belief among lawyers is that it is nearly impossible to dismiss a Chapter 7 voluntarily. However I have done so both times I tried although the debtors were in a position to pay virtually 100% of the claims. A lawyer can help, if anyone can. He or she should be experienced in bankruptcy. We all have 20-20 hindsight, but I bet you wish you had consulted a lawyer before you filed your Ch. 7. Your lawyer may advise you to convert to a Ch. 13. There are lots of important details to consider, and both merits and disadvantages to such a course, so you should discuss it in depth with someone who can take the time to seek out all the facts. Good Luck.
    Answer Applies to: Wisconsin
    Replied: 6/3/2015
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