Can I still get arrested if I just sending them what I can? 10 Answers as of February 04, 2014

Can they put a warrant out for my arrest? Also, I'm young and single, trying to make it on my own and I pay all my bills by myself, so I do not have the full amount to send to them. What if I just send them what I can each month. Can they still take me to court if I'm paying something every month? Please let me know. I'm so scared.

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SmithMarco, P.C.
SmithMarco, P.C. | Larry P. Smith
No, they are lying to you. Payday lenders have scam companies calling all the time just like this. Ignore them. They'll go away.
Answer Applies to: Illinois
Replied: 2/4/2014
Kirby G. Moss PC | Kirby G. Moss
They can take you to court in attempt to collect more quickly. However if you always show up for court hearings you have notice of, nobody can arrest you as we do not have debtor's prison in USA.
Answer Applies to: Indiana
Replied: 2/4/2014
The Law Office of Darren Aronow, PC
The Law Office of Darren Aronow, PC | Darren Aronow
Normally you can not get arrested for civil debt. If you are talking about payday loans, they tell everyone they will have them arrested. This is not true.
Answer Applies to: New York
Replied: 2/4/2014
The Troglin Firm | William M. Troglin
You did not say what kind of debt you are talking about but I am going to presume that it is a loan or credit card which are civil matters. You cannot be arrested for failing to pay a civil debt. You can be sued and if the creditor gets a judgment they can garnish your wages and or your bank account. If a collection agency is calling you, they cannot sue you only a local attorney can and you can't believe half of what collection agency tells you. You should contact the creditor and let them know your financial situation and what you can pay.
Answer Applies to: Georgia
Replied: 1/31/2014
Mauritz Van Niekerk, Attorneys at Law
Mauritz Van Niekerk, Attorneys at Law | Christiaan van Niekerk
No you cannot be arrested for any debt but you should consider filing for bankruptcy.
Answer Applies to: New York
Replied: 2/3/2014
    Patrick W. Currin, Attorney at Law | Patrick Currin
    You cannot go to jail for not paying ordinary debts.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 2/3/2014
    Meister & McCracken Law Firm, PLLC | Joanne M. McCracken
    Do you owe money to the court? If so, yes they can arrest you. If it is normal creditors, they can sue you, get a judgment and garnish your wages. A consultation with a qualified bankruptcy attorney could help you.
    Answer Applies to: Arkansas
    Replied: 2/3/2014
    Stacy Joel Safion, Esq.
    Stacy Joel Safion, Esq. | Stacy Joel Safion
    No arrest is possible.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 2/3/2014
    Edelman, Combs, Latturner & Goodwin, LLC | Daniel A. Edelman
    A creditor can insist on full payment and sue if it does not get it. We do not have debtor's prisons any more. You cannot be arrested for not paying a debt. The only basis on which a debtor can be arrested is if a judgment is entered after you are served with a summons and complaint, a court orders you to appear and answer questions about your income and assets, you fail to comply, and you are served with and ignore an order to show cause why you should not be held in contempt for not appearing and answering questions. There are strict limits on garnishment and exemptions for various types of assets, so that you are not left destitute.
    Answer Applies to: Illinois
    Replied: 2/3/2014
    Westgate Law
    Westgate Law | Justin Harelik
    Creditors don't want to arrest you for not paying the bill. After all, how could you pay at all if you are in prison? The creditor wants a judgment. It also wants to be paid something. You have to try and set up a payment plan that you can afford. In some cases, the creditor will not take less than a certain amount. I would not be afraid of getting arrested, just bad credit. That being said, if you get an order to appear, you must appear in court. Don't ignore that. I had a client in Glendale have a sheriff show up at his door because the client did not show up at a court hearing. The judge had issued a bench warrant because the client did not appear at a debtor's examination. That was a very isolated situation.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 1/31/2014
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