Can I self file and represent myself in the chapter 13 conversion? 27 Answers as of November 01, 2013

I had an attorney who filed my chapter 7. The judge converted the filling to a chapter 13.

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Eranthe Law Firm
Eranthe Law Firm | Cate Eranthe
It's not a good idea. I have seen the Chapter 13 Trustee lay into pro se filers telling them they need to get an attorney or their case will be dismissed.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 11/1/2013
Stephens Gourley & Bywater | David A. Stephens
You can, but Chapter 13 plans are hard to confirm without an attorney.
Answer Applies to: Nevada
Replied: 10/31/2013
Tokarska Law Center
Tokarska Law Center | Kathryn U. Tokarska
Yes you can although it is not recommended because the success rates in chapter 13 on a self represented individual are very poor. The 2011 Central District report states that the success rates are less than 1%.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 10/31/2013
Janet A. Lawson Bankruptcy Attorney
Janet A. Lawson Bankruptcy Attorney | Janet Lawson
Ch 13 is a little tricky, a good lawyer will get you the lowest payment.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 10/31/2013
Law Office of David T Egli | David T. Egli
You can. Chapter 13 cases are complicated even for attorneys. Rules and procedures can vary from judge to judge, as well as from district to district. Many cases end up being dismissed without the debtor obtaining a discharge. It is usually best, then, that you have an attorney experienced with handling chapter 13 cases in the court in which you filed your case represent you.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 10/31/2013
    Joseph Lehn, Esq
    Joseph Lehn, Esq | Lehn Law, PA
    After a conversion, your attorney will remain on the case unless he has withdrawn. If the attorney has withdrawn, you can continue in the case representing yourself. However, it is recommended that you have counsel in your bankruptcy case.
    Answer Applies to: Florida
    Replied: 10/31/2013
    The Law Office of Darren Aronow, PC
    The Law Office of Darren Aronow, PC | Darren Aronow
    Yes, but you are not likely to be successful. Most pro se chapter 13's fail.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 10/31/2013
    Law Offices of Linda Rose Fessler | Linda Fessler
    You can, but I would not advise it. Chapter 13 cases are a great deal more complicated than a Chapter 7.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 10/29/2013
    Scott Goldstein | Scott Goldstein
    You can always represent yourself in any legal proceeding. The question is whether it is a good idea. Chapter 13 is not for amateurs. You should get either good advice from your current lawyer or get a new one. Doing your own chapter 13 is like doing your own heart surgery: messy, painful and with the high likelihood of damage.
    Answer Applies to: New Jersey
    Replied: 10/29/2013
    Law Office of Michael Johnson
    Law Office of Michael Johnson | Michael Johnson
    Yes but very difficult you should consult an attorney. Most attorneys can put fees in plan.
    Answer Applies to: Florida
    Replied: 10/29/2013
    Timothy Casey Theisen, P.A. | Tim Theisen
    Yes, but you may be able to find an attorney who can just get paid out of your chapter 13 payments, i.e. basically your creditors pay the attorney. I'd usually take such a case with a portion down, and a portion paid through your plan.
    Answer Applies to: Minnesota
    Replied: 10/29/2013
    CoverLaw
    CoverLaw | Jim Cover
    You can but 13 is more involved than chapter 7.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 10/28/2013
    Law Offices Of M.Azhar Asadi | M.Azhar Asadi
    You can ,but chapter 13 is complicated and you better off to get an attorney .
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 10/29/2013
    Charles Schneider, P.C.
    Charles Schneider, P.C. | Charles J. Schneider
    It would be the equivalent of pulling your own tooth. There are lawyers out there who do not know how to do a chapter 13. I represent them.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 10/29/2013
    Goldsmith & Guymon
    Goldsmith & Guymon | Marjorie Guymon
    Yes, you have the right to represent yourself in any bankruptcy proceeding.
    Answer Applies to: Nevada
    Replied: 10/28/2013
    Niketas & Clark, LLP
    Niketas & Clark, LLP | Alexia K. Niketas
    Chapter 13 bankruptcy is quite complex and pro se debtors (those who represent themselves) are rarely successful. If your goal is to complete a Chapter 13 (3-5 year) repayment program, you really need to get a lawyer to represent you. I'm not sure what you mean by "the judge converted the filing to a chapter 13." Did you or your attorney file a motion to convert to Chapter 13? Your Chapter 7 attorney should still be the attorney of record on your case unless the bankruptcy court has been formally notified in some way that (s)he is no longer representing you.
    Answer Applies to: Georgia
    Replied: 10/28/2013
    SM Law Group, APC
    SM Law Group, APC | John D. Sarai
    Yes you can. However, if your case was converted to a Chapter 13, you may have had a difficult case and it would be a good idea to have the guidance of an attorney. You will also have to file a substitution of attorney if you wish to represent yourself or hire a new attorney.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 10/28/2013
    Doug Dern | Doug Dern
    Wow are you kidding me?
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 10/29/2013
    A Fresh Start
    A Fresh Start | Dorothy G Bunce
    You can but it sounds like a terrible idea. Chapter 13 cases are many times more complicated than Chapter 7 cases.
    Answer Applies to: Nevada
    Replied: 10/28/2013
    Law Office of J. Thomas Black, P.C.
    Law Office of J. Thomas Black, P.C. | J. Thomas Black
    A chapter 13 is a far more complicated bankruptcy than a chapter 7 is. I recommend that anyone have an experienced bankruptcy attorney help them with a chapter 13 filing. If it was the other way around, a chapter 13 being converted to a chapter 7, I would still recommend that anyone hire an attorney, but there would be a much better chance of success if it were a chapter 13 being converted to a chapter 7, as vice-versa.
    Answer Applies to: Texas
    Replied: 10/28/2013
    The Orantes Law Firm
    The Orantes Law Firm | Giovanni Orantes
    You may always represent yourself in bankruptcy cases; however, it is not recommended at all as it is not a simple proposition. The failure rate for Chapter 13 cases in which the debtors represent themselves is close to 100%. Indeed, even attorneys without enough experience handling Chapter 13 cases usually cannot get the Chapter 13 plans confirmed because there are many requisites that must be met.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 10/28/2013
    Deborah F Bowinski, Attorney & Counselor at Law | Debby Bowinski
    Chapter 13 cases are very complex and difficult. You would be doing yourself a huge favor if you find an attorney to step in and represent you at this point. You should expect to have to come up with a retainer. The success rate of people in chapter 13 without experienced, competent counsel is very low.
    Answer Applies to: Colorado
    Replied: 10/28/2013
    Moore Taylor Law Firm, P.A.
    Moore Taylor Law Firm, P.A. | Jane Downey
    Most pro se chapter 13 cases fail.
    Answer Applies to: South Carolina
    Replied: 10/29/2013
    Portland Bankruptcy Law Group
    Portland Bankruptcy Law Group | Christopher J. Kane
    Yes, you always have the option of representing yourself. However, it is very risky to represent yourself in a Chapter 13 bankruptcy. Chapter 13 is very complicated and you would benefit greatly if you hire an attorney to represent you throughout the whole process. The Chapter 13 Trustee will probably recommend that you hire an attorney. There are many complicated rules that are involved in Chapter 13 and many deadlines you must meet. And, it is important to understand that you can usually pay the attorney a nominal amount up front and the remainder of the attorney fees can be paid to the attorney on a monthly basis out of the money you are paying monthly to the Chapter 13 Trustee. The remaining attorney fees become part of your Chapter 13 Plan.
    Answer Applies to: Oregon
    Replied: 10/28/2013
    Stuart P Gelberg
    Stuart P Gelberg | Stuart P Gelberg
    Yes but your facts don't add up. The Judge can not convert a ch 7 to ch 13 unless you request it.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 10/28/2013
    SM Law Group APC
    SM Law Group APC | Kian Mottahedeh
    Yes you can However a chapter 13 bankruptcy is significantly more complicated. You want to be sure that you are aware of all of the rules and guidelines of the court and the specific trustee that is assigned to your case. Remember, unlike a chapter 7, a chapter 13 can go on for years.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 10/28/2013
    Steele, George, Schofield & Ramos, LLP
    Steele, George, Schofield & Ramos, LLP | Alan E. Ramos
    You can, but it is not advisable.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 10/29/2013
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