Can I see the evidence for a felony warrant before I turn myself in? 11 Answers as of February 28, 2011

They are trying to stick grand theft charges on me. They let me go though. There was no evidence. Then a week went by and I got a call from a detective and told me he checked my priors and I now have a warrant. How can I see evidence on the felony warrant before I turn myself in?

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Law Office of Peter F. Goldscheider
Law Office of Peter F. Goldscheider | Peter Goldscheider
You can't. Discovery does not have to be turned over before the first court appearance.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 2/28/2011
LynchLaw
LynchLaw | Michael Thomas Lynch
Typically you can't. The usual date to get a copy of the police report and most other evidence, would be at your arraignment.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 2/24/2011
The Law Office of Harry E. Hudson, Jr.
The Law Office of Harry E. Hudson, Jr. | Harry E. Hudson, Jr.
Probably not. Check the court and see if there is a warrant. If you go to the sheriff and there is a warrant, you will be arrested. You can also have a bondsman call to make arrangement for bail when you arrive. You do not want to say anything else to any detective. Take your attorney with you.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 2/22/2011
Alanna D. Coopersmith, Attorney at Law
Alanna D. Coopersmith, Attorney at Law | Alanna D. Coopersmith
Ask to see the warrant. If there is in fact a valid warrant for your arrest, you should turn yourself in. Otherwise, they will come after you, arrest you, and set high bail.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 2/21/2011
Law Offices of Lawrence Wolf
Law Offices of Lawrence Wolf | Lawrence Wolf
You can't but we maybe able to keep you out of jail give us a call.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 2/21/2011
    Nelson & Lawless
    Nelson & Lawless | Terry Nelson
    You cant. Youll get a copy of the police reports once you are arraigned.

    When arrested and charged with any crime, the proper questions are, can you be convicted, and what can you do? Defend the charges. Go to court, enter a not guilty plea, set up and attend the court hearing[s] and trial date[s]. File evidence suppression or other motions as applicable. Raise all the available defenses with whatever admissible and credible witnesses, evidence and facts are available for legal arguments for motions, plea-bargaining, or at trial. Effective plea-bargaining, using whatever legal defenses, facts and sympathies you may have, could possibly keep you out of jail, or at least dramatically reduce it. Go to trial if it can't be resolved with motions or a plea bargain. There is no magic wand to wave and make it all disappear. Not exactly a do it yourself project in court for someone who does not know how to effectively represent himself against a professional prosecutor intending to convict you. If you don't know how to do these things, then hire an attorney that does, who will try to get a dismissal, reduction or other decent outcome through plea bargain for you, or take it to trial. If serious about doing so, and if this is in SoCal courts, feel free to contact me. Ill be happy to help you use whatever defenses you may have. If you can't afford private counsel, you can apply for the Public Defender.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 2/21/2011
    The Law Offices of Christopher J. McCann
    The Law Offices of Christopher J. McCann | Christopher J. McCann
    You can't see the "evidence", but you can get information about the charges which must be filed with the court unless the warrant was somehow filed under seal.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 2/21/2011
    Law Office of James Wang, APLC
    Law Office of James Wang, APLC | James Wang
    It depends. But definitely retain an attorney first. The lawyer may accompany you to a police interview and preview the evidence against you, if any, then decide whether to initiate a voluntary surrender on terms more convenient and less embarrassing for you.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 2/21/2011
    Tomas M. Flores, Esq.
    Tomas M. Flores, Esq. | Tomas M. Flores
    No. Generally evidence before charges are filed is not released to the suspect/defendant. If you have an outstanding felony warrant, don't say anything to anyone except an attorney. I suggest you retain one right away.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 2/21/2011
    Dennis Roberts, a P.C.
    Dennis Roberts, a P.C. | Dennis Roberts
    You can't. Sometimes a lawyer can.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 2/21/2011
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