Can I potentially be prosecuted if I turn my employer over to federal authorities? 36 Answers as of June 03, 2013

My employer seems to be using investor monies for personal gain. I want to know if I should acquire counsel prior to contacting authorities. This is not something I would normally do, but I feel that now he has been removed from the company he will do this to more people.

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Reeves Law Firm, P.C.
Reeves Law Firm, P.C. | Roy L. Reeves
The "Whistle blower act" protects you if I understand your question correctly. Report this.
Answer Applies to: Texas
Replied: 10/26/2011
Thomas J. Tomko Attorney At law
Thomas J. Tomko Attorney At law | Thomas J. Tomko
Yes, obtain counsel first.
Answer Applies to: Michigan
Replied: 10/24/2011
Cynthia Henley, Lawyer
Cynthia Henley, Lawyer | Cynthia Henley
Yes! Talk to a lawyer before going to authorities because you know there is always a potential that the employer may try to swing blame back to you! Good idea to ask the question. Lawyer up!
Answer Applies to: Texas
Replied: 10/24/2011
Law Office of Richard Williams
Law Office of Richard Williams | Richard Williams
If I was you, I would go forward with the advice of counsel.
Answer Applies to: Alabama
Replied: 10/24/2011
Timothy J. Thill P.C.
Timothy J. Thill P.C. | Timothy J. Thill
It would be advisable for you to at least discuss this matter with an attorney who is expert in financial crime cases. You do not want to inform authorities unless you are positively sure that this person has committed a crime, and an attorney expert in this very specialized area of the law would be able to advise you properly in what to do.
Answer Applies to: Illinois
Replied: 10/24/2011
    Attorney Paul Lancia
    Attorney Paul Lancia | Paul Lancia
    No, whistle blower act.
    Answer Applies to: Massachusetts
    Replied: 6/3/2013
    Bloom Legal, LLC
    Bloom Legal, LLC | Seth J. Bloom
    You should definitely contact a local employment attorney in your area prior to making any moves toward contacting authorities. Once you have determined that you do not face civil or criminal liability for your actions you can proceed.
    Answer Applies to: Louisiana
    Replied: 10/21/2011
    Craig W. Elhart, P.C.
    Craig W. Elhart, P.C. | Craig Elhart
    Contacting and seeking the advise of an attorney before taking any further action would be a wise course of action.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 10/21/2011
    Law Office of Phillip Weiser
    Law Office of Phillip Weiser | Phillip L. Weiser
    I don't see any action to allow a prosecution for being a whistle blower.
    Answer Applies to: Kansas
    Replied: 10/21/2011
    Mark Thiessen, Attorney at Law
    Mark Thiessen, Attorney at Law | Mark Thiessen
    You are a whistleblower and you have huge protections under the Federal government. You must turn him in and then they cannot fire you for being a whistleblower. If they fire you, call me, you will be entitled to huge compensation.
    Answer Applies to: Texas
    Replied: 10/21/2011
    The Law Office of Harry E. Hudson, Jr.
    The Law Office of Harry E. Hudson, Jr. | Harry E. Hudson, Jr.
    Contact an attorney who represents whistle blowers. You do not, depending on the circumstances, have a requirement to inform authorities about illegal conduct. So, I doubt you have any difficulties. But it would probably be good to use an attorney as a filtering conduct to authorities.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 10/21/2011
    bark & karpf
    bark & karpf | peter bark
    You probably should consult with a lawyer first. If your employer learns that you turned him in, he will probably try to accuse you of being in on his frauds per some other criminal behavior.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 10/21/2011
    The McDonnell Law Firm, PLLC
    The McDonnell Law Firm, PLLC | Patrick J. McDonnell
    You can ALWAYS go to the authorities with information on a crime. It's their duty to investigate it. I don't know why you think that you may prosecuted for doing this.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 10/21/2011
    Law Office of Edward J. Blum
    Law Office of Edward J. Blum | Edward J. Blum
    Yes. Obtain counsel.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 10/21/2011
    Michael Breczinski
    Michael Breczinski | Michael Breczinski
    Did you participate in the scheme? If so then, yes get an attorney.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 10/21/2011
    Betts Legal Services
    Betts Legal Services | Shawn M. Betts
    Anytime a person chooses to be a whistleblower, it is wise to retain an attorney to assist them and to protect them from any potential penalties that could arise to the company.
    Answer Applies to: Minnesota
    Replied: 10/20/2011
    Austin Legal Services, PLC
    Austin Legal Services, PLC | Jared Austin
    I don't know what you could be prosecuted for unless you somehow broke the law yourself. If you are terminated because of turning your boss in, you may have a claim under the Whistle-blower Statute. Talk with an attorney for more information.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 10/20/2011
    Palumbo and Kosofsky
    Palumbo and Kosofsky | Michael Palumbo
    Yes you should consult counsel before you do anything.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 10/20/2011
    Gary Moore, Attorney at Law
    Gary Moore, Attorney at Law | Gary Moore
    If you were involved in his disception you could be prosecuted and should have an attorney before you approach a prosecutor's office.
    Answer Applies to: New Jersey
    Replied: 10/20/2011
    Andersen Law PLLC
    Andersen Law PLLC | Craig Andersen
    It is usually a good idea to have an attorney on retainer for this kind of thing. However, if money is an issue, just stick to telling the authorities the facts. Don't inject your opinion, embellish or exaggerate. Simply call 911 and relate the facts to the dispatcher. When the 911 operator answers, tell her that you are not reporting an emergency. Rather tell her that you need an officer to come and take a report concerning a theft and they will dispatch an officer when one becomes available. As long as you are reporting facts and doing so in good faith, you need not worry about libel or slander. But as I have stated, it's better to have an attorney with you.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 10/20/2011
    Baner and Baner
    Baner and Baner | Jonathan Baner
    It can be delicate. If your working for a company that is committing some sort of malfeasance, then how sure are you that the illicit activities aren't connected to you, and how sure are you that the activities can't be connected to you by the authorities and/or a criminal that wants to avoid liability. If money is no issue, then it would be best to hire an attorney to help with the process. Furthermore, most attorneys have connections that you do not have and know the right places to go, and can get in contact with people a little easier. It's always a good idea to do the right thing as you suggest.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 10/20/2011
    Law Offices of Kenneth Wincorn P.C.
    Law Offices of Kenneth Wincorn P.C. | Kenneth Wincorn
    You should consult with a lawyer to see if you need to obtain immunity.
    Answer Applies to: Texas
    Replied: 10/20/2011
    Law Office of Charles J. Block
    Law Office of Charles J. Block | Charles J. Block
    I do not know how you could get in trouble for something your employer is doing, but I would suggest you consult an attorney to be sure.
    Answer Applies to: New Jersey
    Replied: 10/20/2011
    The Law Offices of Victor J Mazzaraco
    The Law Offices of Victor J Mazzaraco | Victor J Mazzaraco
    A word of caution before proceeding: You had better be darn certain the accusations you plan on making are true and accurate or you will be setting yourself up for a slander charge. Not only slander, but slander-per-se, meaning the person slandered won't have to prove pecuniary damages ($ lost) to collect damages from you. It cannot hurt to discuss what you know with an attorney as his or her judgment regarding what are and aren't legitimate reasons for believing what you do is probably a bit more finely tuned than your own - no offense intended.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 10/20/2011
    The Law Offices of Christopher J. McCann
    The Law Offices of Christopher J. McCann | Christopher J. McCann
    You should definitely retain a lawyer first to make sure you don't get into trouble. That lawyer can contact the authorities for you to ensure your good intentions don't get twisted against you.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 10/20/2011
    Law Office of Jeff Yeh
    Law Office of Jeff Yeh | Jeff Yeh
    You better contact a lawyer first. There is no guarantee that a whistle-blower won't be prosecuted.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 10/20/2011
    The Chastaine Law Office
    The Chastaine Law Office | Michael Chastaine
    Yes getting counsel would be smart so you don't caught up as a defendant.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 10/20/2011
    Sifuentes & Locke
    Sifuentes & Locke | Shannon Willis Locke
    Yes. You need to consult with a lawyer before you make any decisions. If an investigator make a promise to you that he will not prosecute you, that promise is not binding on him or the United States (or State of Texas). So, let's say you go to the authorities. They promise that if you come in they will not prosecute you. You go in and tell them everything and unknowingly tell them that you were involved (you helped him or followed his orders or knew what was happening was wrong but continued to do it). Then the prosecutor can decide to charge you with this, and the promise that was made is not binding on him. However, if you hire a lawyer, a lawyer can contact the authorities and make sure that what you tell them is pursuant to an agreement that you will not be prosecuted. Your attorney should know how to make this deal so that the government cannot pursue charges against you. Additionally, everything you tell the government can be used against you, everything your lawyer says cannot be imputed to you if your lawyer knows what he/she is doing.
    Answer Applies to: Texas
    Replied: 10/20/2011
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