Can I plea no contest to a DUI? 76 Answers as of February 22, 2012

I wanted to know if I could defend my DUI case by pleading no contest. I did blow above the legal limit, but I was told to not plead guilty anyway. If I explained what happened, will I have a chance at no contest?

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Law Office of Thomas A. Medford, Jr., PC
Law Office of Thomas A. Medford, Jr., PC | Thomas A. Medford, Jr.
You can plead "no contest" but you would in effect be conceding responsibility and the court may not consider whether the breath test results were below the legal limit. It you be prudent for you to consult an attorney in your area concerning the consequences of pleading no contest.
Answer Applies to: District of Columbia
Replied: 8/15/2011
Night Life Lawyers
Night Life Lawyers | Joshua Aldabbagh
I don't think you understand what a plea of "no contest" means. Its essentially the same thing as pleading guilty. You are telling the court that although you are not going to admit guilt, you are not going to fight the charge, either. The state will find you guilty, and you will have a DUI conviction on your record. The point of a no contest plea is you are not admitting liability, so if there is a subsequent civil case filed against you based on the same incident (i.e., you hit someone while driving drunk, and now they are suing you for damages), there won't be an admission of guilt on record in the criminal case that can be used against you. You should plead "not guilty" and hire an attorney to look at the evidence against you and determine the strength of your case.
Answer Applies to: Nevada
Replied: 8/8/2011
Law Office of Peter F. Goldscheider
Law Office of Peter F. Goldscheider | Peter Goldscheider
A plea of no contest is no different than a guilty plea but in the case of a misdemeanor cannot be used against you in a civil law suit against you.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 8/5/2011
Lowenstein Law Office
Lowenstein Law Office | Anthony Lowenstein
It depends on several factors.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 8/4/2011
Thomas J. Tomko Attorney At law
Thomas J. Tomko Attorney At law | Thomas J. Tomko
In some courts, certain judges take a no contest plea regularly (e.g. 36th District Court). Others may or may not The real question is why. A no contest plea is treated as a guilty plea. One reason why is civil liability. Was there an accident or a potential injury claim? If so, then no contest makes sense. If not, there may be little, if any, difference. If you are getting advice about what to do, whether about what to plea or otherwise, I hope that it is from an attorney who has a strategy for your particular case. Many well intentioned people who are not attorneys have given advice to people that may end up being not so good, resulting in an unexpected harsh result to someone like you. Often such advice from a well meaning person, who is not paid for their 'expertise', is advice worth every penny that was never paid. My best suggestion is that you hire an attorney to give you experienced advice.
Answer Applies to: Michigan
Replied: 8/3/2011
    Boske Law Offices
    Boske Law Offices | Michael A Boske
    Yes.
    Answer Applies to: Ohio
    Replied: 8/3/2011
    Law Office of Thomas F. Mueller
    Law Office of Thomas F. Mueller | Thomas Mueller
    Anybody can enter a plea of No Contest with the judges permission, which is forthcoming 99% of the time. It does you little good since it has the same effect as a guilty plea.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 8/3/2011
    The Law Office of Kevin O'Grady
    The Law Office of Kevin O'Grady | Kevin O'Grady
    You should always strongly consider fighting a criminal accusation, especially including a DUI charge. Do not believe that what the officer says is accurate, including whatever the breath machine might have produced as a result. It is always your choice as the accused to plead guilty or no contest, and there is almost no difference in the two. However, it is much better to not have a conviction of any sort and to try to fight it, as it is your right to do. Hire an attorney.
    Answer Applies to: Hawaii
    Replied: 8/3/2011
    Michael Breczinski
    Michael Breczinski | Michael Breczinski
    No Contest is a type of guilty plea where you don't have to admit what you did wrong. It is the same as pleading guilty in the result. You need an attorney.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 8/3/2011
    Law Office of Joseph Schodowski
    Law Office of Joseph Schodowski | Joseph Schodowski
    Yes. But, in Washington it is called an "Alfred plea." This is done you state up front that you do not believe you are in fact guilty but you are going to plead guilty anyway because you want to take advantage of the Prosecutor's Sentencing Recommendation. You must also state that you believe there is a substantial possibility that a Judge or Jury would find you guilty should the matter go to trial. From a criminal record standpoint, there is no difference between a straight guilty plea and an Alford plea; both simply show "G" for guilty. With this type of guilty plea, however, you never have to admit that you did something when you didn't.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 8/3/2011
    Edward  D. Dowling IV Attorney at Law
    Edward D. Dowling IV Attorney at Law | Edward D. Dowling IV
    This response is general information only and does not establish an attorney client relationship. However, i would need further details to answer properly but you should hire an attorney and disclose all the details and let him evaluate the situation to see if you have any defenses or whether you should plead no contest or other plea bargain.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 8/3/2011
    The Law Offices of Robert L. Driessen
    The Law Offices of Robert L. Driessen | Robert L. Driessen
    Please understand that a no contest plea is the same exact thing as a guilty plea. The only difference is that a no contest plea cannot be used against you in a civil case. So if you were not in an accident and there is no potential civil liability there is no advantage to a no contest plea other than the warm and fuzzy feeling it gives you not to plead guilty. What you want to do is plead NOT GUILTY and hire an attorney to assist you in your case.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 8/3/2011
    Dunnings Law Firm
    Dunnings Law Firm | Steven Dunnings
    You need to hire an attorney
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 8/3/2011
    Harris Law Firm
    Harris Law Firm | Jennifer C. Robins
    It is a common misconception that a no contest plea has a different legal affect than a guilty plea. A no contest plea has the same affect as pleading guilty, that being, you will be found guilty and you will be convicted. The only way to put on a defense to a criminal charge is to have a trial. You would not be allowed to "defend" yourself after entering a no contest plea, although the court will ask you if you have anything to say during your plea hearing. A no contest plea is basically like saying you don't really believe you are guilty but you think the prosecutor has enough proof that you could be found guilty at trial so you do not wish to fight the charge.
    Answer Applies to: Oregon
    Replied: 8/3/2011
    Beaulier Law Office
    Beaulier Law Office | Maury Beaulier
    Minnesota does not have a no contest plea. Moreover, a no contest plea has the same effect as a plea of guilty. It is a conviction and bestows no additional benefits.
    Answer Applies to: Minnesota
    Replied: 8/2/2011
    Healan Law Offices
    Healan Law Offices | William D. Healan, III
    There is not much benefit to pleading no contest or solo contender any more. Back in the 90s, you could plead no contest and keep your license from being suspended. If you were involved in an accident and are worried about the other driver suing you, a no contest plea might be helpful. Otherwise, a no contest plea will get you the same punishment and license suspension as a guilty plea.
    Answer Applies to: Georgia
    Replied: 8/8/2011
    Cynthia Henley, Lawyer
    Cynthia Henley, Lawyer | Cynthia Henley
    A no contest plea is of no value to you. You will be found guilty. The only time a no contest plea is of value is that it prevents a person's plea from being used in civil court (like if you had an accident.) You MUST get a lawyer as soon as possible. Just because you blew over the legal limit does not automatically mean you lose. People win DWI cases all the time over the limit. (And, you have driver's license issues that need to be addressed within 15 days of your arrest.)
    Answer Applies to: Texas
    Replied: 8/2/2011
    Expert Bronx Criminal Lawyers
    Expert Bronx Criminal Lawyers | Alexander Sanchez
    Pleading no contest is the same as pleading guilty. What you should be doing is thinking about discussing this case with your lawyer to decide if you have a viable defense. Advice: hire a lawyer.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 8/2/2011
    Law Office of Michael Bialys THE DUI MAN
    Law Office of Michael Bialys THE DUI MAN | Michael Bialys
    No contest is not a defense, it is regarded as a conviction.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 2/22/2012
    Law Office of Edward J. Blum
    Law Office of Edward J. Blum | Edward J. Blum
    In criminal court Guilty and No Contest have the same 'force and effect'. That is, if you plead no contest at least as far as the criminal court is concerned it is exactly the same as pleading guilty. The only benefit of pleading no contest is that the plea cannot be used against you in a civil proceeding to establish liability. So if you had an accident with your DUI, then when you plead 'no contest' to the DUI, the plaintiff's civil lawyer could not use the guilty plea to establish that the accident was your fault. He would have to prove you were drunk at the time of the accident separately. You should fight your DUI. Pleading 'no contest' is not the way to do that.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 8/2/2011
    Jules N. Fiani, Attorney at Law
    Jules N. Fiani, Attorney at Law | Jules Fiani
    Yes. It is the same as a Guilty Plea for sentencing.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 8/2/2011
    Eric J Schurman, Attorney at Law
    Eric J Schurman, Attorney at Law | Eric James Schurman
    "No contest" is not an option in Washington. It is very important for you to hire an attorney to get the best result possible.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 8/2/2011
    Michael R. Nack, Attorney at Law
    Michael R. Nack, Attorney at Law | Michael R. Nack
    No. There is no such thing in Missouri as entering a plea of "No Contest". You need to hire an attorney.
    Answer Applies to: Missouri
    Replied: 8/2/2011
    The Woods Law Firm
    The Woods Law Firm | F.W. Woods Jr.
    A no contest has the same effect as a guilty plea. If you get a lawyer you may be able to avoid a DUI. It is not wise to plead guilty or no contest. Talk to a lawyer today for free. Go to the website DUI-TRAFFIC LAWYER.com and get help now to save thousands of dollars and avoid a criminal record!
    Answer Applies to: South Carolina
    Replied: 8/2/2011
    Law Offices of Matthew Murillo
    Law Offices of Matthew Murillo | Matthew Murillo
    Obviously, you don't understand the difference between entering a "guilty" plea, a "no contest" plea, and a "not guilty" plea. There are important distinctions between them, depending on what you want to do. I suggest you call an attorney and discuss your situation, and decide how to plea from there. DUI's can be defended against. You need to understand your case and what can be done, before you decide to plea guilty or "no contest"
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 8/2/2011
    Law Offices of John Carney
    Law Offices of John Carney | John Carney
    You should not handle your case any more than you should pull your own teeth or proscribe your own medicine. The court will appoint an attorney to handle your case. You cannot plead "no contest" in New York, but that is the same as a guilty plea in the states that allow it. The solo contender or no contest plea is for stupid people who are guilty but do not want to admit their guilt, so the court allows them to plead the case out without admitting exactly what they did. It provides more deniability later, but in New York you have to spell out exactly what you did in court before a judge before he will accept your plea. Drunk driving is like shooting a gun at a moving train and hoping you don't hit anyone with the bullets. Hopefully this will make you aware of the dangers to yourself and all the thousands of innocent people on the road who are just trying to get home to their families when you make such poor decisions. Good Luck.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 8/2/2011
    Law Office of Eric Sterkenburg
    Law Office of Eric Sterkenburg | Eric Sterkenburg
    In the criminal justice system a plea of no contest is the same as guilty. What a no contest plea does for you is to make your criminal case conviction unusable in a civil procreating.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 8/2/2011
    Law Offices of Christopher Jackson
    Law Offices of Christopher Jackson | Christopher L. Jackson
    NO. You can not plead no contest in KY. You will have to maintain your not guilty plea and either convince the prosecutor to drop the charge or go to trial. I recommend getting a lawyer to help you.
    Answer Applies to: Kentucky
    Replied: 8/2/2011
    Goolsby Law Office
    Goolsby Law Office | Richard Goolsby
    I am also a former state and federal prosecutor. This is a question which should be addressed by you after carefully discussing all the facts, along with your rights and options, with your own criminal lawyer. Good luck.
    Answer Applies to: Georgia
    Replied: 8/2/2011
    Law Office of Thomas J. Ogas
    Law Office of Thomas J. Ogas | Thomas Ogas
    No. Pleading No Contest is the same as pleading guilty. You can explain your case, if the judge allows it, but the judge will still give you the same penalty as if you plead guilty. If you want to fight your case, then you have to plead Not guilty.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 8/2/2011
    Frances R. Johnson
    Frances R. Johnson | Frances R. Johnson
    A no contest plea has the same legal effect and consequence as a guilty plea.
    Answer Applies to: Colorado
    Replied: 8/2/2011
    Law Office of Phillip Weiser
    Law Office of Phillip Weiser | Phillip L. Weiser
    A no contest plea will usually result in a guilty finding. The main difference is that the defendant does not say he is guilty of the charge, but he is not contesting it either. Thus, if the State's paperwork is in proper order, the Judge will find that if the defendant does not contest the allegation he will find him guilty just the same. A no contest plea is not considered a defense.
    Answer Applies to: Kansas
    Replied: 8/2/2011
    The Chastaine Law Office
    The Chastaine Law Office | Michael Chastaine
    No contest is treated like a guilty plea. If you want to fight the case you have to plead NOT guilty.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 8/2/2011
    Law Office of Jeff Yeh
    Law Office of Jeff Yeh | Jeff Yeh
    Pleading no contest is the same as pleading guilty. Either plea will result in a DUI conviction. You better find a DUI specialist to try and reduce the DUI to something else. This is entirely possible even if you blew above the legal limit.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 8/2/2011
    The Law Office of Lewis R. Rosenblum
    The Law Office of Lewis R. Rosenblum | Lewis Rosenblum
    A no contest plea will not help you very much, it is the exact same as a guilty plea. The only reason a no contest plea helps is if you were in an accident and someone is suing you civilly, then a no contest plea cannot be used as an admission of guilt. Otherwise it is exactly the same as a guilty plea.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 8/2/2011
    Nelson & Lawless
    Nelson & Lawless | Terry Nelson
    Doing so is the same as pleading guilty. It is not defending the case. You only need to do so if there was an accident and you are trying to avoid a guilty plea being used against you in civil court Of course you can fight the charges. When arrested or charged with any crime, the proper questions are, can any evidence obtained in a test, search or confession be used against you, and can you be convicted, and what can you do? Raise all possible defenses with whatever admissible and credible witnesses, evidence, facts and sympathies are available for legal arguments, for evidence suppression or other motions, or at trial. Not exactly a do it yourself project in court for someone who does not know how to effectively represent himself against a professional prosecutor intending to convict and jail you. If you don't know how to do these things effectively, then hire an attorney that does, who will try to get a dismissal, diversion, reduction or other decent outcome through plea bargain, or take it to trial if appropriate.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 8/2/2011
    Law Office of James Christie, LLC
    Law Office of James Christie, LLC | James Christie
    No, you can not defend your case by pleading no contest. There is no practical difference between a no contest and guilty plea, at least as it concerns criminal consequences. If you plead no contest, you give up your right to make the prosecuting authority prove the case against you, and you will be sentenced as if you had plead guilty. A plea of no contest essentially tells the court and prosecutor that you do not intend to defend yourself against the pending charges.
    Answer Applies to: Alaska
    Replied: 8/2/2011
    Harrison & Harrison
    Harrison & Harrison | Samuel Harrison
    A "No Contest" or Nolo Contendre plea is still available in Georgia, but it is useless for a DUI case. Georgia law now treats a Nolo Contendre plea to a DUI just like a guilty plea.
    Answer Applies to: Georgia
    Replied: 8/2/2011
    John Segelbaum, P.S.
    John Segelbaum, P.S. | John Segelbaum
    That is not an option. You must plead either guilty or not guilty and no one should just plead guilty to DUI without first consulting with an attorney. Even if you blew "over the limit" the breath test can be challenged and there are many other legal and factual issues that need to be investigated. Most DUI cases get reduced as the result of litigation and negotiation. A DUI is a serious charge that will give you a criminal record, put you in jail and cause you to lose your license.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 8/2/2011
    Andersen Law PLLC
    Andersen Law PLLC | Craig Andersen
    Well, the problem with just pleading guilty (there's no such thing as 'no contest' in Washington) is that there are serious, heinous consequences to pleading guilty. It may well be that you have a technical defense to the DUI charge. Also, any number of issues of evidence in your case may get you a plea deal that may eliminate or reduce the consequences to you. I strongly suggest that you call me or a lawyer of your choosing to discuss the facts of the case and your legal options.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 8/1/2011
    Michael Maltby, Attorney at Law
    Michael Maltby, Attorney at Law | Michael Maltby
    A defendant doe not plead no contest in Washington. There is what is an Alford plea where you say you are not guilty bus believe a jury could convict you anyway based on the evidence. This still counts as a guilty plea. I would not advise doing an Alford plea unless an attorney has discussed this with you. In any event any plea other than not guity results in a conviction and this is no defense to a DUI. Moreover, just because you blew over the legal limit does not make you guilty. You need to have a lawyer advise you after he/she has spoke to you and reviewed your case.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 8/1/2011
    Connell-Savela
    Connell-Savela | Jason Savela
    In Colorado, no contest has the same effect as Guilty. Usually at your first appearance, you can get an offer from the DA without explaining yourself. If you do not like the offer, get an attorney. Or better yet, just get an attorney.
    Answer Applies to: Colorado
    Replied: 8/1/2011
    Law Offices of James A Bates
    Law Offices of James A Bates | James A Bates
    Wait Wait. "No contest" is the same as guilty in traffic/crime court. The only difference is if there was an accident. No-contest makes it harder for the other person to sue you. But if you plead no-contest in court, the case is over and you are found guilty.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 8/2/2011
    The Law Office of Harry E. Hudson, Jr.
    The Law Office of Harry E. Hudson, Jr. | Harry E. Hudson, Jr.
    No contest is one of several pleas available to you. It admits your involvement and the court will treat it as a guilty plea. It is advantage to plea no contest if you were nvolved in an accident THAT IS NOT also charged with the DUI. If an accident related to the DUI is charged against you, hire an attorney.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 8/1/2011
    Miller & Harrison, LLC
    Miller & Harrison, LLC | David Harrison
    It depends on the prosecutor and judge as to whether they will allow a no contest plea, but even if it is allowed, it is treated just like a guilty plea by the Court.
    Answer Applies to: Colorado
    Replied: 8/1/2011
    Jonathan S. Willett Attorney at Law
    Jonathan S. Willett Attorney at Law | Jonathan S. Willett
    A no contest is the same as a guilty plea. Better to work out a plea agreement.
    Answer Applies to: Colorado
    Replied: 8/1/2011
    The Law Firm of David Jolly
    The Law Firm of David Jolly | David Jolly
    You can plead "no-contest" to the DUI, if you wish. It is unwise and any Judge worth their ethical salts will strongly advise against it until you have consulted with an attorney. My advice is to consult with an attorney before you do this. If you cannot afford a private lawyer apply for a public defender.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 8/1/2011
    Austin Legal Services, PLC
    Austin Legal Services, PLC | Jared Austin
    It depends on what stage of the proceedings we are talking. You should almost always plead "Not Guilty" at arraignment because otherwise you lose any opportunity for a Pretrial Conference which means no plea bargaining. A No Contest plea is the equivalent of a Guilty plea in that it will be treated as such. You are saying that you do not contest the Complaint or the evidence against you. It is possible to plead No Contest if the prosecutor agrees to it. You should at least speak to a lawyer before making any type of plea and you should seriously consider retaining a DUI attorney. Even for a first offense, the consequences can be severe, costly, and long lasting.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 8/1/2011
    Klisz Law Office, PLLC
    Klisz Law Office, PLLC | Timothy J. Klisz
    No contest is the same as guilty. You are not contesting the charges against you. You will be sentenced as if you plead guilty and it will go down as a conviction.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 8/1/2011
    Law Offices of Scott G. Hilderman
    Law Offices of Scott G. Hilderman | Scott G. Hilderman
    Yes.
    Answer Applies to: Montana
    Replied: 8/1/2011
    Harden Law Offices
    Harden Law Offices | Leonard D. Harden
    Pleading no contest means that you are presenting no defense and a guilty conviction will be entered against you. There are mandatory minimums on DWI charges. The only reason to enter a no contest plea is if there is civil liability, i.e. someone was injured as a result of your actions. Whoever you are getting advise from is wrong. Do not heed that person's advise. You need to consult with a lawyer that handles DWI charges. I encourage you to meet with the best qualified lawyer in your area. Most lawyers will not charge for an initial consultation.
    Answer Applies to: New Hampshire
    Replied: 8/1/2011
    Palumbo and Kosofsky
    Palumbo and Kosofsky | Michael Palumbo
    A "no contest" plea is akin to a guilty plea. There is a legal term for "Explain[ing] what happened," it's called a confession. Listen to no one except your lawyer, and if you do not have one our office practices DWI defense.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 8/1/2011
    Rothstein Law PLLC
    Rothstein Law PLLC | Eric Rothstein
    New York does not have No Contest pleas. You don't give the facts and don't say if you have a prior record but why would you want to just plead guilty to a crime?
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 8/1/2011
    Law Office of Michael E. Hendrickson
    Law Office of Michael E. Hendrickson | Michael E. Hendrickson
    Sure, you could plead Nolo Contendere (No Contest) but by doing so you would not be "defending your case" but rather you would be entering in effect a plea of guilty to the charge of DUI. Legally speaking, the two amount to the same thing.
    Answer Applies to: Virginia
    Replied: 8/1/2011
    Law Office of Rankin Johnson IV, LLC
    Law Office of Rankin Johnson IV, LLC | Rankin Johnson IV
    A no-contest plea is not a defense; it means that you aren't contesting the state's allegations of the facts. It's more or less the same as an Alford plea, although no-contest is the right term in Oregon state court. By contrast, in a guilty plea, you affirmatively agree with the state's version of the facts. There is little difference between them for most people, and you will still be convicted. If you admit the state's version of the facts but believe that you still aren't guilty (evidence should be suppressed because of an illegal search, or you had to drive due to an emergency) that's a basis for a trial, or maybe a stipulated-facts trial. You should not plead guilty unless your attorney advises you to. For your first offense, you can probably do diversion and avoid a conviction. If you can't do diversion (a few cases don't qualify), then it probably makes sense to go to trial, but that's something to talk to an attorney about.
    Answer Applies to: Oregon
    Replied: 8/1/2011
    Brucar & Yetter, P.C.
    Brucar & Yetter, P.C. | Wayne Brucar
    No contest is not an option in Illinois. You must ultimately plead either guilty or not guilty. Explaining what happened is known as a trial and follows a not guilty plea. If you have a defense to the DUI, you may want to consider trial. Please understand that answering this doesn't create an attorney/client relationship between us, and as hard as I try to answer your question well, it isn't legal advice. No matter how much information you put into a question, the answers you are going to get are still going to be vague. It is in your interest to contact a lawyer, most of whom will do a free consultation. Even 15 minutes with a lawyer is going to produce a more specific answer to your problem.
    Answer Applies to: Illinois
    Replied: 8/1/2011
    Bloom Legal, LLC
    Bloom Legal, LLC | Seth J. Bloom
    It is unclear exactly what you are hoping to be able to accomplish here. You can enter a plea of no contest in your DUI case but this can often has essentially the same result as a conviction. By pleading no contest (nolo contendere) you are essentially saying that you are not taking a position against the charges - this means that you can still be convicted and still end up with the charges on your record. Generally, the only reason to enter a plea of no contest is if you have been offered some sort of plea deal by prosecutors. Sometimes prosecutors will offer to reduce the charges and/or sentence against you in return for a no contest plea. Unless you stand to gain something from pleading no contest, it is not advisable to do so. Make sure that you have consulted with a local attorney before accepting any sort of plea deal because you want to make sure to preserve your right to have any potential convictions expunged from your record in the future (an attorney will be able to advise you whether you are needlessly giving up rights by accepting a deal).
    Answer Applies to: Louisiana
    Replied: 8/1/2011
    Law Office of Neal L. Weinstein
    Law Office of Neal L. Weinstein | Neal L. Weinstein
    You can plead no contest, but it is the same effect as pleading guilty, same fine, same suspension, same record, so you should not do that but hire an attorney to review the case and see if you have a defense. If you have a low test, you may be able to negotiate a better charge, but this would take an attorney to review the facts and defend you. I have been defending OUI victims for 30 years, so reviewing the facts is not a big issue.
    Answer Applies to: Maine
    Replied: 8/1/2011
    Wallin & Klarich: A Law Corporation
    Wallin & Klarich: A Law Corporation | Paul Wallin
    The only difference between a no contest plea and a guilty plea is that a no contest plea cannot be used in a future civil case. This has no advantage for you unless you were in an accident. You do not have a clear understanding of the law and you need to contact a DUI law firm with years of experience to help you before you make a mistake you may regret later.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 8/1/2011
    Collins Law Firm, P.A.
    Collins Law Firm, P.A. | John C. Collins
    No contest is essentially a guilty plea. Same fines and still goes on your record. If you want to fight it you must plead not guilty. Contact a dwi attorney as soon as possible. There is a list of very good dwi lawyers at the National College for DUI Defense website. Good luck.
    Answer Applies to: Arkansas
    Replied: 8/1/2011
    LynchLaw
    LynchLaw | Michael Thomas Lynch
    The short answer is, Yes. However, the way that you ask the question makes me wonder if you fully understand what a plea of no contest means for you. My suggestion is to find an attorney, especially one who will give you a free consultation, and tell them the story. It is possible a plea of "No contest" is not your best option.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 8/1/2011
    Law Office of Joe Dane
    Law Office of Joe Dane | Joe Dane
    A no contest plea has the same legal effect as a guilty plea except that it cannot be used as an admission of guilt in a civil proceeding. For example, if you were DUI and got in a crash, you would probably want to plead no contest (if that's what it came down to) rather than guilty if liability was in dispute in the civil case. A no contest plea in the criminal court will still count as a DUI conviction, is a prior, will result in license suspension just like a guilty plea. Some people prefer to plead no contest to save face if that makes the difference to you, then you can always make that request through your attorney if you have one. (And you really should have an attorney representing you, since there is more to a DUI than just the blood alcohol level)
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 8/1/2011
    Elmbrook Law Offices
    Elmbrook Law Offices | Gregory Straub
    You are eligible to enter a plea of guilty, not guilty or no contest. If you enter a plea of no contest, you will be found guilty. However, by pleading no contest, you are preserving your rights in case there was any property damage or personal injuries sustained.
    Answer Applies to: Wisconsin
    Replied: 8/1/2011
    Law Office of Kyle T. Green, PLLC
    Law Office of Kyle T. Green, PLLC | Kyle T. Green
    For all intents and purposes, a no contest plea is the same as a guilty plea. You'll still face the same penalties and conditions as if you had plead guilty to the charge. Also, in most circumstances, a court will only let you plead no contest if you cannot remember the incident at all.
    Answer Applies to: Arizona
    Replied: 8/1/2011
    Braunstein Law, PC
    Braunstein Law, PC | Jacob Braunstein
    Pleading "no contest" has the same result as pleading "guilty." When a defendant pleads "no contest," he is simply telling the court that he does not wish to contest the charges. The court then takes the plea, enters a conviction, and sentences the defendant accordingly. If you wish to defend against the charges, you must enter a plea of "not guilty."
    Answer Applies to: Oregon
    Replied: 8/1/2011
    Law Office of Michael Morgan, l.L.C.
    Law Office of Michael Morgan, l.L.C. | Michael Morgan
    There is no such thing as a No Contest plea in Washington statethe closest equivalent is known as an Alford plea or a Newton plea which is the functional equivalent to a guilty plea but does not involve an admission of guilt.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 8/1/2011
    The Law Office of Eric R. Chandler, P.C., L.L.O.
    The Law Office of Eric R. Chandler, P.C., L.L.O. | Eric R. Chandler
    In criminal court, a no contest plea is treated the same as a guilty plea. The reason for a no contest plea is to avoid the plea being used against you at a later legal proceeding.
    Answer Applies to: Nebraska
    Replied: 8/1/2011
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