Can I get in trouble if my boyfriend embezzled money? 37 Answers as of July 12, 2013

I just found out that my boyfriend has embezzled money from his employer. During our time together, he has given me gifts, taken me on trips, helped with household costs, etc. He was also receiving a paycheck. Can I get in trouble if I received gifts? They are not outrageous and could have been provided through his paychecks.

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Law Office of Peter F. Goldscheider
Law Office of Peter F. Goldscheider | Peter Goldscheider
Probably not but the District Attorney has a lot of discretion and could claim that you received the proceeds of stolen property.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 7/18/2011
Bloom Legal, LLC
Bloom Legal, LLC | Seth J. Bloom
The fact that you now know that your boyfriend committed embezzlement is what could expose you to potential liability. If charges have not already been filed and you keep information to yourself it is possible that you could be charged as an accessory after the fact for helping him keep it quiet. For this reason you should certainly consider at least consulting with a local attorney ahead of time who will be able to advise you whether or not to come forward with the information and will be able to work to protect you from liability.
Answer Applies to: Louisiana
Replied: 5/31/2011
Thomas J. Tomko Attorney At law
Thomas J. Tomko Attorney At law | Thomas J. Tomko
You are really asking if you can be charged as an accessory to a crime. This will depend on the facts in your case. You do not describe enough of the facts to provide a clear answer. The best advice I can give is for you to hire an attorney to review the entire matter. You should not make statements to anyone investigating this matter without prior advice of an attorney or having an attorney present.
Answer Applies to: Michigan
Replied: 5/27/2011
Jules N. Fiani, Attorney at Law
Jules N. Fiani, Attorney at Law | Jules Fiani
You can only get in trouble if you knew and you accepted the money knowing that it was embezzled.
Answer Applies to: Michigan
Replied: 5/27/2011
Law Office of Brendan M. Kelly
Law Office of Brendan M. Kelly | Brendan M. Kelly
Small gifts overtime and during a relationship should not cause you to get into any trouble.
Answer Applies to: Nebraska
Replied: 5/27/2011
    The Law Office of Harry E. Hudson, Jr.
    The Law Office of Harry E. Hudson, Jr. | Harry E. Hudson, Jr.
    Do not think so, based on what you have said. However, You do not have to talk to cops. Cops tend to include people in your situation and are not inclined to exonerate you. Cops might want to include you on an aiding and abetting theory, i.e., you encouraged him. You might also want to seriously consider distancing yourself from boy friend.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 5/27/2011
    Law Office of Phillip Weiser
    Law Office of Phillip Weiser | Phillip L. Weiser
    To be charged as an accessory to a crime, you must know the crime is about to be committed or has been committed. If you receive proceeds of the crime and know it, you can be charged. The State must prove your knowledge. Now that you know, you should not accept any further proceeds.
    Answer Applies to: Kansas
    Replied: 5/27/2011
    Law Office of Eric Sterkenburg
    Law Office of Eric Sterkenburg | Eric Sterkenburg
    You would be in trouble if you knew at the time they were bought with stolen money. If now that you know you are in trouble if you do not report him.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 5/27/2011
    Law Office of Richard Williams
    Law Office of Richard Williams | Richard Williams
    You should not be charged with this crime based only on your boyfriend having committed the offense. The investigators would have to be able to prove that you knowingly and voluntarily assisted your boyfriend in doing this.There should be no charge just because you have received gifts from your boyfriend when you did not know he was buying you gifts with stolen money.I strongly urge you not to make any statements to any investigator without legal representation.
    Answer Applies to: Alabama
    Replied: 5/27/2011
    Craig W. Elhart, P.C.
    Craig W. Elhart, P.C. | Craig Elhart
    You are not responsible for your boyfriends crime. That is unless you were an accomplice or had some active part in the crime. If you knew nothing about the embezzlement, you should have nothing to worry about, other than if it can be traced that certain gifts were bought with stolen money, you may have to forfeit those gifts. You cannot obtain good title to property from a thief.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 5/27/2011
    Law Office of Michael Moody
    Law Office of Michael Moody | Michael Moody
    The state would have to prove that you participated some way in the embezzlement, i.e., that you were somehow a party to the crime.
    Answer Applies to: Georgia
    Replied: 5/27/2011
    Timothy J. Thill P.C.
    Timothy J. Thill P.C. | Timothy J. Thill
    You should not get in any trouble because of what your boyfriend did. If you had no knowledge of what he was doing, you are not culpable, however, if you knew of it, and the prosecution can establish your participation in the scam, you could be charged, but from what you are saying here, you should have nothing to worry about. I would suggest separating from him, he is a bad influence on you.
    Answer Applies to: Illinois
    Replied: 5/27/2011
    Edward  D. Dowling IV Attorney at Law
    Edward D. Dowling IV Attorney at Law | Edward D. Dowling IV
    Generally unless you were an accomplice in your boyfriend's criminal activity you will not get in trouble. However if your boyfriend gave you gifts that were stolen ( instead of bought with money that was not from the money he embezzled ) and if you knew it was stolen then you could be charged with receiving stolen goods. If you do get charged you should hire an attorney.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 5/27/2011
    Fitzpatrick, Mariano, & Santos, PC
    Fitzpatrick, Mariano, & Santos, PC | Raymond J. Savoy
    In order to be charged with a crime, a person must know that a crime occurred and actively participated in the crime, or did not call the police after receiving benefits from the crime. In this scenario, if you did not know that your boyfriend embezzled the money, and it was reasonable to believe that the purchases he made for you could have come from his paycheck, then you did not commit a crime and cannot get in trouble.
    Answer Applies to: Connecticut
    Replied: 5/27/2011
    Goolsby Law Office
    Goolsby Law Office | Richard Goolsby
    It is always difficult, if not impossible to predict what might happen in such situations. You might want to consult with a criminal attorney in your own community. Good luck!
    Answer Applies to: Georgia
    Replied: 5/27/2011
    Reeves Law Firm, P.C.
    Reeves Law Firm, P.C. | Roy L. Reeves
    My recommendation is break up with this person. Employee theft is politically hot, by that I mean, the DA has political incentive to go for blood when and if your B/F is arrested. Chances are, he will be. Plus, you know, now, that he is dishonest. As for getting into trouble, you did not know and you did not participate. Though, you could end up a witness. That said, if you continue to stay with this guy, you do know now, and while I think it is a stretch for the DA to put pressure on you or even to attempt to get an indictment - this is a politically hot issue. Employers give money to campaigns, thieves do not. Employers bring money to the community, thieves take money from the community. Do you see the pattern here? Again, not what you asked, but the best thing you can do is get out of the situation.
    Answer Applies to: Texas
    Replied: 5/27/2011
    Eric J Schurman, Attorney at Law
    Eric J Schurman, Attorney at Law | Eric James Schurman
    Likely not...assuming you didnt know the gifts were proceeds of stolen money.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 5/27/2011
    Harden Law Offices
    Harden Law Offices | Leonard D. Harden
    It really depends, on your involvement if you can get in trouble for your boyfriend's action. If as you claim you had no prior knowledge it doesn't seem likely. Every crime requires a mental intent and a physical act. If you were truly unaware of the actions of your boyfriend you should be fine.
    Answer Applies to: New Hampshire
    Replied: 5/27/2011
    Giannini Law Office, PC
    Giannini Law Office, PC | Robert Giannini
    You can be prosecuted for theft by receiving if it can be shown that you knew or should have known the items were stolen. If they were reasonably small gifts and you had no reason to believe he was stealing the money then you will probably be okay. If he will do that to his boss he is probably not worthy of your trust either. Plus, now you do know, so if he gives you more gifts you could be in trouble. Might be time for him to go.
    Answer Applies to: Georgia
    Replied: 5/27/2011
    Palumbo and Kosofsky
    Palumbo and Kosofsky | Michael Palumbo
    Your boyfriend needs to retain defense counsel, and we can represent him.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 7/12/2013
    Beaulier Law Office
    Beaulier Law Office | Maury Beaulier
    You would not be liable for any criminal conduct so long as you were unaware the criminal conduct was occurring.
    Answer Applies to: Minnesota
    Replied: 5/26/2011
    Dennis Roberts, a P.C.
    Dennis Roberts, a P.C. | Dennis Roberts
    No.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 6/10/2013
    Law Office of Tracey S. Sang
    Law Office of Tracey S. Sang | Tracey Sang
    You're probably fine.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 5/26/2011
    Law Offices of John Carney
    Law Offices of John Carney | John Carney
    Unless you participated in the crimes you cannot be held criminally responsible for taking money he gave you. I would however consider finding another boyfriend.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 5/26/2011
    NOLA Criminal Law
    NOLA Criminal Law | Townsend Myers
    In order to be liable for the crimes of another, you must have some knowledge of the crime and assist in it in some way (including assisting in covering it up). Unknowingly receiving gifts that are purchased with the proceeds of a crime would not be illegal if you didn't know about it. Your boyfriend would have to account for the lost money (and repay it), but you would not be in trouble under the circumstances you describe.
    Answer Applies to: Louisiana
    Replied: 5/26/2011
    Michael Anthony Wing, P.C.
    Michael Anthony Wing, P.C. | Michael Anthony Wing
    Your facts don't indicate that you had the required intent to be found guilty of a crime. You would have needed to now it was going on and somehow helped him. Stay well.
    Answer Applies to: Alabama
    Replied: 5/26/2011
    The Law Office of Kevin O'Grady
    The Law Office of Kevin O'Grady | Kevin O'Grady
    If you believe that the police may interview you because of something that someone else did, the police may look at you as a suspect, accomplice and another defendant. Unless you are the complaining witness and you feel confident you didn't commit a crime, you should retain a private attorney to represent you and properly advise as the investigation progresses.
    Answer Applies to: Hawaii
    Replied: 5/26/2011
    Austin Legal Services, PLC
    Austin Legal Services, PLC | Jared Austin
    You could only get in trouble if you knew about the embezzlement or should have known about it. If the money he was spending on you could have reasonably come from other legitimate sources and with no evidence to tie you to the crime or the aftermath of the crime, you should be okay. But be careful, especially if you don't know your boyfriend very well. He could try to cast some of the blame off on you in order to make things better for himself. In order to ease your mind, try speaking with an experienced criminal attorney as soon as possible. Most will offer a free consultation.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 5/26/2011
    Howard W. Collins, Attorney at Law
    Howard W. Collins, Attorney at Law | Howard W. Collins
    Probably not so long as you did not know. A zealous prosecutor may not agree with that if your lifestyle with him was clearly beyond his means and you had some knowledge of what was going on. If the police or detectives want to talk to you, I think you should be prepared in advance. I would suggest you call to discuss your strategy.
    Answer Applies to: Oregon
    Replied: 5/26/2011
    Nelson & Lawless
    Nelson & Lawless | Terry Nelson
    Possible but nor real likely, but you could be charged with receiving stolen property, conspiracy, accomplice, etc. If any of that happens to you, or if he is serious about hiring counsel to help in this, and if this is in SoCal courts, feel free to contact me.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 5/26/2011
    Miller & Harrison, LLC
    Miller & Harrison, LLC | David Harrison
    It would be quite unlikely that you could be charged with anything.
    Answer Applies to: Colorado
    Replied: 5/26/2011
    The Law Offices of Robert L. Driessen
    The Law Offices of Robert L. Driessen | Robert L. Driessen
    Very doubtful that you would be charged. Your boyfriend should hire an attorney as soon as possible to assist him. As long as he does not implicate you there should not be any issues.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 5/26/2011
    Law Office of Jeff Yeh
    Law Office of Jeff Yeh | Jeff Yeh
    No, unless you were an accomplice in his crime. Merely accepting gifts from a thief is not a crime.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 5/26/2011
    Law Office of James E. Smith
    Law Office of James E. Smith | James Smith
    Only if you conspired with him to embezzle from his employer.
    Answer Applies to: Nevada
    Replied: 5/26/2011
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